Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

3 Great Beers Made with Wine

3 Great Beers Made with Wine

We've all heard the phrase "It takes a lot of good beer to make good wine," a reference to winemakers' time-honored after-work refreshment. Recently, thanks to modern craft brewers employing old winemakers' ways — i.e. wood aging, wild yeasts, cork-and-wire closures — the line between beer and wine has gotten deliciously blurry. The best of these resulting brews? Dryer, more complex, and sometimes appealingly acidic, counterbalancing sweetness… and overall, deeper in flavor.

That alone is a welcome angle. But now, a handful of craft brewers around the world are using actual wine grape juice in their beers. And why not? Ancient libations often blended grape and grain, among other fermentable natural fruit sugars and spices. Some of the most sought after modern versions are rarities brewed at Cantillon, in Belgium, hoarded in the cellars of celebrated beer bars like Brussels' Moeder Lambic and a smattering of secretive U.S. watering holes. But you don't have to fly overseas to try some of the best genre-busting brews. Read on for three of our favorite beer-wine hybrids, which range from about $15 to $20 for 750ml.

Noble Rot
Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ales / Rehoboth, Del.

A pale but amply strong (9 percent ABV) and spicy saison-style beer blended with juice of high-brix pinot gris as well as viognier affected by a benevolent fungus called botrytis (a.k.a. "noble rot"). This noble rot, prized in dessert wine grapes like sauternes, intensifies and dehydrates the grapes, resulting in lush flavors. (Dogfish Head)

The Vine 2011
Cascade Barrel House / Portland, Ore.

This sour 9.2 percent ABV ale derives from a blend of golden ales aged in French and American oak for an entire year, then fermented for an additional three months with the juice of white wine grapes which mellow and round out the tart aged beers. The varietal? A closely-held secret. (Cascade Barrel House)

Geuze Vigneronne
Brasserie Cantillon / Brussels, Belgium

Cantillon’s affable patriarch Jean-Pierre Van Roy began blending the classic tart Belgian lambic-style beer with white wine grape juice in 1973. Today, his son and head blender Jean carries the torch. To make this beer each fall, the family imports 1,000 kilos of sweet Italian muscat grapes to blend with organic lambic beers aged two years in Burgundy barrels, resulting in a quaffable masterpiece of 5 percent ABV available in select U.S. markets. (Shelton Bros.)

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Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


Concord Grape Wine Recipes

Concord grapes are the most popularly planted native American grapes. Concord grapes are used to make wines, jellies, jams, and tarts. A variety of Vitis Labrusca, the Concord Grape is resistant to many of the diseases which destroy the European grape, Vitis Vinifera they were the first onto which Vinifera cuttings were grafted to combat insects and disease and the first to be successfully cross-pollenated with European stock to produce hybrids. Most notable of these hybrids are French-American, but crossings were also made with German, Spanish, Portugese, Lowlands, and Baltic grapes. The resulting vines are hardy and produce good yields.

The Concord, however -- even its hybrids -- rarely contain the high amount of natural sugar that pure Vinifera varieties contain. They also contain more pectin and acid, and their wines may exude a musky aroma disagreeable to some. For these reasons their juice is always reinforced with added sugar, almost always diluted with water to balance the acid, treated with pectic enzyme to ensure that it clears, and may be flavored slightly with certain aromatic herbs or spices to counter the natural muskiness.

We have included three recipes below. The first produces a dry wine, so you may want to sweeten it slightly before bottling if you're not partial to dry wine. The second is diluted only slightly and requires a good many more grapes to produce, but results in a full-bodied, sweet dessert wine. Both wines should be stabilized before final sweetening and bottling, either with a commercial stabilizer (such as Sorbitol) or one crushed Campden tablet and 1/2 teaspoon of potassium sorbate per gallon. Final sweetening is always accomplished using two parts sugar dissolved in one part boiling water and allowed to cool. This syrup must be clear, so stir until every granule of sugar has dissolved. The third recipe is a "second wine," made by using the grape pulp from the first batch of wine. Grape concentrate is added to provide body and vinous quality.

If you wish to add an aromatic agent to your wine, any of the following will work: anise, bitter almond, camomile, cardamom, cinnamon, clove, corriander, juniper berries, whole nutmeg, fresh rosemary, saffron, sage, summer savory, thyme, tonka bean, woodruff, or vanilla bean. Do not use ground spices, but rather the leaf, seed, or -- in the case of cinnamon -- bark. Place an amount (one tablespoon per gallon for most, or two nutmegs, tonka beans or vanilla beans) in a finely meshed jelly bag, tied, and place it in the must during the primary fermentation only. Squeeze gently before discarding.

When adding sugar to raise specific gravity a tablespoon less than 8 ounces will raise the specific gravity of one gallon of must 0.010. For grape wines, the beginning specific gravity must always be at least 1.095 to achieve an alcohol content of 12.7%, while 12% is required to preserve the wine. This, however, presumes very little liquid will be lost during racking, which is a bad assumption. It is therefore wiser to begin with a starting specific gravity of 1.105, which under ideal circumstances will produce 14.1% alcohol by volume. Because you will lose liquid during racking, the finished figure will be closer to 12.7%.

Concord Grape wine must age two years in the bottle before being considered ready to drink. It always astounds the novice how greatly wine improves with age. A wine that is terrible after one year will be delightful one year later and wonderful in the third year. Therefore, the best plan for one to follow is to make a set amount (3-5 gallons) every year, set the bottles on their side in a cool, dark closet, and forget about drinking any until you begin the third year's winemaking. Even then, you may want to age them further. Just remember one thing: it takes five 750 ml wine bottles to store one gallon of wine 25 bottles to store 5 gallons.


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