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Double Cut Dry-Aged Bone-In Rib-Eye

Double Cut Dry-Aged Bone-In Rib-Eye


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There’s nothing more elegant that a rib-eye, and this straightforward dish uses simple aromatics to season the steak, and pairs it with creamy potatoes and crispy Brussels sprouts.

Ingredients

For the steak

  • Two 20-ounce double bone-in aged rib-eye steaks
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 Tablespoon butter
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 cloves garlic

For the potatoes

  • 6 Idaho potatoes
  • 3 Cups heavy cream
  • 2 Tablespoons truffle shavings (optional)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 Cup shaved Parmesan

For the Brussels sprouts

  • 1 Pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and outer leaves removed
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 Ounces pancetta, sliced 1/4-inch thick, small diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 Cup chicken stock

Servings2

Calories Per Serving3973

Folate equivalent (total)285µg71%


How To Grill a Gigantic Rib-Eye Steak

Grilled steaks and pan-seared steaks are really two completely different beasts flavorwise, but as far as cooking technique goes, there are only a few minor distinctions.

For one thing, the heat you can get out of charcoal briquettes (or better yet for searing—real hardwood coals) is far greater than what you can get out of a home stovetop range or broiler, leading to superior charring, as well as the singing of dripping beef fat which gives grilled beef its characteristic smoky, ever-so-slightly acrid (in a good way) flavor. It's a flavor you simply can't get from a stovetop or even a gas grill, both of which burn significantly cooler than coal.

Going thick is always a good idea on the gril—you want steaks at least an inch thick or sol—it's the best way to guarantee that you get plenty of good crust development while still being able to maintain a nice, expansive medium-rare center. But ultra-thick, Flintstone-sized double-cut bone-in big-enough-to-serve-two-fully-grown-Thundercats ribeye steaks (commonly referred to as "Cowboy Chops") require a bit of extra care when cooking. Their thick size makes them all too easy to end up with a burnt exterior and cold, raw middle.

Just like cooking indoors, the very best way to guarantee that you maximize that medium-rare center—you want to see pink from edge to edge—while still getting a nicely charred crust is to first cook the steak at a very gentle low heat before finishing it over ripping hot heat to sear its surface. It's better to do it in this order rather than searing first and cooking through after because a pre-warmed steak will sear much faster, minimizing the amount of overcooked meat under the surface (and we all know by now that searing does not lock in juices, right?)

Of course, all of our other tried and true steak tips apply here, including:

  • Salt early and liberally, at least 40 minutes before you plan on grilling. This gives enough time for salt to draw out moisture then get reabsorbed.
  • Flip regularly particularly during the first cooler phase of cooking. This'll help the steak come to temperature faster and more evenly. Since a steak this size can take up to half an hour to cook through, I flip it at least every five minutes.
  • Use a thermometer to guarantee perfectly cooked steaks. No other method is as reliable. (See here for a temperature chart). For a thick cowboy chop, you can expect your final temperature to rise by about five degrees as it rests, which takes us to.
  • Let it rest in order to allow muscle fibers to cool down and relax, so that the steak can retain more juices. I let steak rest until it's two degrees below its maximum cooking temperature.

Stay tuned for a SE Father's Day giveaway soon. We'll be giving away a couple of aged, insanely well-marbled two-pounder Cowboy Chops from The Double R Ranch, that will arrive in time for Dad's Day. Giddy-up.

In the meantime—tell me, serious eaters: what are your personal secrets for perfect grilled steaks?

For full instructions on how to best cook'em, click through the slideshow above.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (750-ml) bottle dry red wine (preferably from Burgundy)
  • 1 medium-size yellow onion, halved
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 bunch thyme
  • 1 whole star anise
  • 2 (32-ounce) 30- or 60-day dry-aged bone-in rib eye steaks (about 1 3/4 inches thick), patted dry
  • 3 tablespoons plus 3/4 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 4 teaspoons beef demi-glace (such as Williams Sonoma)
  • 6 ounces high-quality canned escargot, drained, rinsed, and, if desired, roughly chopped (optional)
  • 1/2 cup black truffle butter (such as D&rsquoArtagnan), chilled and cut into 8 pieces, divided
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon flaky sea salt

Bring red wine to a boil in a saucepan over medium-high. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, uncovered, until reduced to about 1 1/2 cups, about 45 minutes. Add onion, bay leaves, thyme, and star anise. Simmer until reduced to about 1 cup, about 15 minutes. Pour mixture through a fine wire-mesh strainer into a bowl discard solids. Set aside.

Place 15 charcoal briquettes in an even layer in a chimney starter light briquettes. When briquettes are covered with a layer of gray ash, use tongs to transfer 5 briquettes to one side of bottom grate of grill. Place about 1/4 cup applewood chips and about 1/4 cup oak chips on top of charcoal, and insert top grill grate. Cover and adjust vents to bring internal temperature to 85°F to 95°F, adding more briquettes if needed to reach desired temperature.

Fill a rimmed baking sheet with a single layer of ice cubes. Place steaks on a wire rack, and set rack over ice. Place baking sheet with steaks on top grill grate over unlit side of grill. Cover and smoke beef, maintaining temperature of 85°F to 95°F and allowing steaks to become infused with smoke flavor, about 15 minutes. Remove steaks from grill, and sprinkle all sides with 3 tablespoons kosher salt. Let stand at room temperature 30 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over high. Add olive oil, tilting skillet to evenly coat bottom. Add steaks, and cook, undisturbed, 2 minutes. Flip and cook, undisturbed, 2 minutes. Use tongs to turn steaks upright to sear fat cap and bone. Continue to cook steaks, flipping and turning every minute, until a golden-brown crust develops on both sides and on edges of fat cap, 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer skillet with steaks to preheated oven, and cook until a thermometer inserted in thickest portion of steak registers 110°F, about 10 minutes. Remove steaks from skillet, and let rest on a wire rack 12 minutes.

Meanwhile, pour off drippings from skillet (save for Garlicky Haricots Verts with Hazelnuts, if desired). Heat skillet over medium-high. Add wine reduction, and bring to a simmer, stirring and scraping up any browned bits from bottom of skillet. Add demi-glace and, if using, escargot, and cook, stirring constantly, until demi-glace is incorporated and escargot is heated through, about 1 minute. Remove from heat, and gradually stir in 6 tablespoons truffle butter, 2 pieces at a time, allowing butter to emulsify after each addition. Stir in parsley, pepper, and remaining 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt.

Slice steaks, and arrange on a serving platter. Sprinkle steaks evenly with sea salt, top with remaining 2 tablespoons truffle butter, and serve with Burgundy-truffle sauce.


7 Tips to Cook Dry-Aged Steaks Perfectly

Dry-aged steaks are different from fresh-cut steaks. During the dry-aging process, we’ve removed a significant amount of moisture to concentrate and enhance the beef flavors. Some beef cuts lose as much as 25% to 30% of their weight in water.

One consequence is that they will quickly become dry if you overcook them. So we recommend cooking dry-aged steaks no more than medium rare. Keep in mind that a dry-aged steak will not be as “bloody” as a fresh-cut steak cooked to the same doneness.

Here are our 7 top tips on how to prepare your dry-aged steaks to perfection.

1. If your dry-aged steak is frozen, then thaw it slowly — preferably in the refrigerator 2 to 3 days prior to cooking. Then remove from the refrigerator an hour before cooking to allow it to reach room temperature.

If you don’t have 3 days to slowly thaw your steak, then thaw it more rapidly by placing in a bowl of cold water.

2. Wait until just before cooking to season generously with salt. If you apply salt too soon, it will pull moisture out of the meat. And when the surface of the meat is wet, it is more difficult to sear and seal the steak. Also, be generous with the salt, because some of it will come off the steak during the searing and resting phase of cooking.

3. Quickly sear both sides of the steak with high heat, either on the grill or in a very hot pan. Searing will caramelize the meat surface and seal in juices. (Searing in a pan avoids the possibility of excessive charcoal flavors from the grill.)

The secret to a good sear is to make sure that the surface of the steak does not have any unwanted moisture, which is present when the steak is still cold (condensation) or when salt is applied too early.

4. After searing, transfer the steak to a lower, indirect heat until the desired doneness. If you have a large grill, build the fire on one side. Sear on the hot side, and then move to the cooler side to cook with indirect heat.

5. Use tongs rather than a fork to handle your steak. Every time you puncture the steak, it breaks the sear and juices escape.

6. Use a meat thermometer to determine when the steak is cooked the way you want. Insert the meat thermometer from the side of the steak to its center, and leave it there until you are ready to serve.

If you don’t have a meat thermometer, you can use a chef’s trick to estimate doneness. While touching your index finger to your thumb, press the meat around the base of your thumb. This firmness is what your steak should feel like when it’s cooked rare. Now touch your middle finger to your thumb, and press the meat around the base of your thumb. This is how firm your steak should be if you want medium rare. Using your ring finger will give an approximate firmness for medium. And using your little finger will give you well done (but we’re not going to ruin a dry-aged steak by cooking it well done, right?)

7. Allow the steak to rest on an almost-too-hot-to-touch plate for about the same amount of time that it was cooked. This is one of the most important, and most frequently ignored steps. Resting allows the juices to redistribute and settle before cutting. If you cut too soon, all the juices will end up on your cutting board or plate, and not in the steak.


Dry Aging the Roast

For dry aging, use a flat, leakproof container or tray to hold the roast. Place a wire rack on the bottom, to allow airflow beneath the beef. Pat the roast dry with paper towels and center it on the rack. Cover the exposed surfaces with cheesecloth or freshly laundered kitchen towels. Clear a space in your refrigerator, and place the roast inside. Let it age for three to nine days, changing the towels daily for the first three days. The longer the beef ages, the more intense the flavors will become.


Gallery

  • 1 tablespoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt
  • 2 (1 1/2-pound) 1 1/2-inch-thick bone-in rib eye steaks
  • 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil
  • 2 teaspoons black pepper
  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • Sel gris

Holding salt about 1 foot above steaks, sprinkle both sides of steaks evenly with salt in a steady stream, pressing slightly to adhere. Place steaks on a wire rack set inside a rimmed baking sheet. Chill, uncovered, 72 hours, turning twice a day.

Remove steaks from refrigerator. Let stand 1 hour. Preheat oven to 400°F. Heat oil in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet over high. Sprinkle steaks evenly with pepper. When a wisp of smoke rises from skillet, add steaks in a single layer, and cook, undisturbed, until a light brown crust forms, about 4 minutes. Flip steaks, and cook 4 minutes. Using tongs, turn steaks on fatty edges, leaning steaks against sides of skillet to keep them stable, if needed. Cook, rolling occasionally to render fat on edges, until caramelized all over, 4 to 5 minutes. Place steaks flat in skillet, and add butter and garlic around steaks.

Transfer skillet to preheated oven. Roast steaks 5 minutes. Transfer skillet to stovetop over medium. Slightly tilt skillet toward you so butter pools in bottom of skillet spoon brown butter over steaks. Carefully flip steaks, and baste again. Return skillet to oven, and roast until a thermometer inserted in thickest portion registers 120°F, 4 to 6 minutes.

Transfer steaks to a cutting board, and let rest 10 minutes. Remove bones, and separate fatty strip from each steak. Slice steak thinly against the grain, and reassemble steaks on a platter, fanning slices out slightly. Arrange bones on plates sprinkle steaks with sel gris.


All of our meats are available for pickup at our NYC and Westchester locations. To place your pickup order, please call the restaurants.

Dry aging is a process that both tenderizes and adds flavor to beef. Our dry aging room is kept below 35°F with a humidity of less than 90% and an ample amount of air flow. We age large primals of beef for a minimum of 28 days, for mild to medium aged flavor. During this time, some truly amazing things happen. Water from inside the meat is drawn out through evaporation, which causes the meat to shrink and the beef flavors to become more concentrated. Also, natural enzymes inside the beef break down the meat and tenderize it.

We take great pride in our meat and only serve the very best USDA Prime cuts. Our meat has never been frozen and arrives to you fresh. Meat is cut by our expert butchers and immediately after it’s portioned, it is vacuum packed to ensure optimal freshness. Meat is shipped Next Day Air with packaging designed for at least 48 hours of transit in case of delays. Please refrigerate or freeze immediately upon receipt. For best results, we recommend eating within 7 days if kept refrigerated or eating within 30 days if kept frozen. Deliveries may be delayed by one business shipping day in the case of any unforeseen transit issues.

All of our meat ships with UPS Proactive Response Secure. This is the highest level of service offered by any shipper. All of our packages are tracked and monitored by a special team at UPS. If one of our packages encounters a possible delay, then UPS will do everything possible to ensure on-time delivery. This includes rerouting packages, moving packages to the next commercial flight out, hiring private couriers to hand deliver packages, and making multiple delivery attempts. To add to peace of mind, all packages are insured against all possible transit delays.


Fullblood Wagyu Ribeye Steak (Bone-In)

Highly marbled and often considered the best steak by Wagyu beef connoisseurs, the Fullblood Wagyu bone-in Ribeye is cut from the rib section. The bone allows the meat to be more insulated than a boneless Ribeye, which ultimately affects protein denaturation. The meat directly around the bone is more tender because of this. Robust flavor, tenderness, and juiciness are a few of the Ribeye steak’s signature qualities.

- Dry aged for 28 days
- All Natural, no additives, no preservatives
- Antibiotic and hormone free

Due to natural variations in our cattle, shape, size, and/or weight of individual cuts may vary. It is normal to see slight variations in color depending on both the type of product and the aging process.

Lightly season with salt and pepper.
Cook to Rare or Medium-Rare for best flavor and texture. Overcooking a Wagyu ribeye can cause too much of the intramuscular fat (marbling) to melt away, leaving it tough and chewy.

Avoid cooking over direct flame. Due to high amount of intramuscular fat, as the Ribeye cooks, that fat will begin to melt and drip off, which can create a lot of smoke and cause the flame to flare up.

Recommended Internal Cooking Temps:

Rare 120°-125°
Medium Rare 130°-135°
Medium 140°-145°
Medium Well 150°-155°
Well Done 160° and above

FREE SHIPPING ON ORDER OVER $200*

*To qualify for FREE SHIPPING, your order total, after any possible discounts are applied, must be more than $200. FREE SHIPPING is shipped via Standard Ground Shipping Only and will typically be delivered in 3-4 business days.

PACKAGING: Each frozen and individually vacuum sealed product is carefully packed with dry ice and/or gel packs. Orders will be delivered frozen or slightly thawed (but still cold) depending on the time in transit.

ORDER PLACEMENT AND SHIPPING OPTIONS:

Orders placed on Monday (all day) and Tuesday (all day) - Customers may select Overnight, 2-Day, 3-Day or Standard Ground Shipping.

Orders placed on Wednesday (before 3:00 PM EST) - Customers may select Overnight or 2-Day Shipping. * 3-Day and Standard Ground Shipping selections may not ship until the following Monday due to time in transit. *

Orders placed on Thursday (before 3:00 PM EST) - Customers may select Overnight Shipping. * 2-Day, 3-Day and Standard Ground Shipping selections will ship the following Monday. *

Orders placed on Thursday afternoon (after 3:00 PM EST), Friday (all day), Saturday (all day), or Sunday (all day) - Customers may select any Shipping option, but your order will not be shipped until the following Monday.

PLEASE NOTE: Shipping may be interrupted or delayed due to Federal holidays. If this occurs, your order will be shipped on the next available business day.

Highly marbled and often considered the best steak by Wagyu beef connoisseurs, the Fullblood Wagyu bone-in Ribeye is cut from the rib section. The bone allows the meat to be more insulated than a boneless Ribeye, which ultimately affects protein denaturation. The meat directly around the bone is more tender because of this. Robust flavor, tenderness, and juiciness are a few of the Ribeye steak’s signature qualities.

- Dry aged for 28 days
- All Natural, no additives, no preservatives
- Antibiotic and hormone free

Due to natural variations in our cattle, shape, size, and/or weight of individual cuts may vary. It is normal to see slight variations in color depending on both the type of product and the aging process.

Lightly season with salt and pepper.
Cook to Rare or Medium-Rare for best flavor and texture. Overcooking a Wagyu ribeye can cause too much of the intramuscular fat (marbling) to melt away, leaving it tough and chewy.

Avoid cooking over direct flame. Due to high amount of intramuscular fat, as the Ribeye cooks, that fat will begin to melt and drip off, which can create a lot of smoke and cause the flame to flare up.

Recommended Internal Cooking Temps:

Rare 120°-125°
Medium Rare 130°-135°
Medium 140°-145°
Medium Well 150°-155°
Well Done 160° and above

FREE SHIPPING ON ORDER OVER $200*

*To qualify for FREE SHIPPING, your order total, after any possible discounts are applied, must be more than $200. FREE SHIPPING is shipped via Standard Ground Shipping Only and will typically be delivered in 3-4 business days.

PACKAGING: Each frozen and individually vacuum sealed product is carefully packed with dry ice and/or gel packs. Orders will be delivered frozen or slightly thawed (but still cold) depending on the time in transit.

ORDER PLACEMENT AND SHIPPING OPTIONS:

Orders placed on Monday (all day) and Tuesday (all day) - Customers may select Overnight, 2-Day, 3-Day or Standard Ground Shipping.

Orders placed on Wednesday (before 3:00 PM EST) - Customers may select Overnight or 2-Day Shipping. * 3-Day and Standard Ground Shipping selections may not ship until the following Monday due to time in transit. *

Orders placed on Thursday (before 3:00 PM EST) - Customers may select Overnight Shipping. * 2-Day, 3-Day and Standard Ground Shipping selections will ship the following Monday. *

Orders placed on Thursday afternoon (after 3:00 PM EST), Friday (all day), Saturday (all day), or Sunday (all day) - Customers may select any Shipping option, but your order will not be shipped until the following Monday.

PLEASE NOTE: Shipping may be interrupted or delayed due to Federal holidays. If this occurs, your order will be shipped on the next available business day.


Grass Fed Bone-in Ribeye Beef Steak (1 lb)

Our dry-aged Grass Fed Bone-In Ribeye Steak is one of the most flavorful cuts of beef available. Bone-in Ribeye Steaks are a popular cut, both with the home chef and executive chefs at fine restaurants. The Grass Fed Ribeye steak comes from the Rib part of the animal, resulting in marbled steak with tender texture. Larger cuts of bone-in Ribeyes are often called Delmonico or Cowboy cuts. Order a thick-cut bone-in Ribeye steak, delivered direct from family beef producer. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.

Our cowboy-inspired, thick cut bone-in Ribeye steaks (we call it Pete’s Choice) honor the Cowboys that work hard to produce great beef. Our family favorite!

Popular Grass Fed Beef Ribeye Steak Dishes:

  • Grilled steak with Béarnaise sauce and grilled asparagus
  • Cowboy-style steak with Kona coffee rub
  • Surf and Turf (steak and King Crab, Scallops or Lobster)
  • Bone-in Ribeye, with a side of Ribeye

Naturally Raised Beef

Our beef is raised free range & minimally processed: 100% natural and grass finished. No GMOs, additives, added hormones or antibiotics. Our family raises premium Angus and Hereford beef animals in central Kansas (Flint Hills region) and eastern Colorado. Learn more about Our Story or you can check out our Blog. From our pasture to your dinner table.

Delivery & Shipping Information

Free Kansas City Delivery (orders $99 & up). Includes most of Kansas City metro area (Kansas and Missouri). Or, $8.95 delivery charge for orders under $99.

$26.95 Shipping (up to 12 lbs): Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama
+ $10: New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, Michigan, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Pennsylvania

**Due to Covid-19 related issues, shipping may not be available to all areas. Contact Us to inquire out the current shipping availability**


The best steak recipe from the grill?

Of course, the questions of taste are never to be answered at all. In the DRY AGER® manufactory, however, one agrees with the topic of grilling. High quality Dry Aged Beef is the foundation and dedication in preparing.

1. The right choice

Basically, for meat the following applies: What is fried in the pan, also tastes of the grill. With high-quality Dry Aged Beef, however, you do not venture to experiment. First of all, the question must be clarified as to which piece of meat best complements the smoky grill aromas. The classic for steak recipes is the Rumpsteak, bone steaks like Porterhouse and Tomahawk and juicy Entrecôtes. But also dry – cut lamb chops, dry aged beef burgers or ribs are excellent for preparing over the open fire. The different pieces also need different cooking times.

2. The preparation

Those who have found their perfect piece of dry aged beef should get it out of the fridge at least 30 to 60 minutes before grilling. At room temperature, the meat is allowed to warm up, which in the end makes it more delicate. Approximately 15 minutes before the grand appearance on the grill, a pinch of coarse salt (for example, Crystal salt or Fleur de Sel) provides the right spice. In addition, the meat is painted with some oil.


3. On the grill

  • Position the coals in such a way that a strong heat field and a weaker heated grill area are created. Thus the meat can be moved in one go.
  • When the coals are heated through, the meat is briefly sown on both sides. Depending on the meat size and the desired cooking point, about 1-4 minutes per side. (For a 3 cm thick porterhouse it should be 3-4 minutes per side, with a tender flank steak, 60 seconds per side.)
  • When the desired browning and temperature are reached, remove from heat and allow to cool over indirect heat.

4. The perfect temperature

With the perfect steak recipe the core is in the right temperature. It determines the cooking success. So that the Dry Aged Beef is also really medium, rare or well done when grilling, it is recommended to work with a meat thermometer. A few degrees make the difference here:

  • Blue Rare/ Bleu (inner core raw): 38°C
  • Rare (“bloody”): 48°C
  • Medium Rare (“english”): 52°C
  • Medium (“pink”): 56°C
  • Medium Well (“half pink”): 57–60°C
  • Well done: 64-74°C


5. The sequel

As in the maturation, the taste is also in the resting hours. When the meat reaches the desired core temperature, it should be allowed to relax for at least 5 minutes. Before serving, the meat is seasoned with some salt and depending on the taste (chili flakes), fresh herbs (rosemary, thyme) or exotic spices (smoked peppers, fennel and coriander seeds).


HOW TO MAKE COWBOY STEAKS

When it comes to cooking this particular cut of beef, nothing beats an open flame, and these hunky, gorgeous steaks deserve nothing but the best.

  1. Set out the ribeyes at room temperature 30 minutes before grilling.
  2. Prep the grill and bring to medium-high heat.
  3. Season steaks liberally with salt and pepper.
  4. Grill about 4 minutes on each side for medium-rare.
  5. Allow to rest 5-10 minutes, serve, and enjoy!

STEAK DONENESS COOKING GUIDELINES

Note, there are multiple factors that go into the degree of doneness of a cooked steak, and it goes far beyond cook time and the temperature of the grill. For example, the internal temperature of the beef when it hits the grill, the amount of marbling, and the thickness of the steak will all affect cook time.

Therefore, these suggested cook times should be used as “guidelines,” for grilling accuracy, nothing beats an instant-read thermometer .

  • For rare steaks, cook for about 3 minutes on each side. Pull when the internal temperature reaches 120°.
  • For medium-rare steaks, cook for about 4 minutes on each side. Pull when the internal temperature reaches 130°.
  • For medium to medium-well steaks, cook for about 5 minutes on each side. Pull when the internal temperature reaches 140° – 145°.

COWBOY STEAK Q & A

WHAT IS A COWBOY STEAK CUT?

A Cowboy Steak is a Bone-In Ribeye.

WHERE DOES IT COME FROM?

A Cowboy Steak comes from the ribeye which is from the primal rib section of a cow, or the Prime Rib.

WHY IS IT CALLED A COWBOY RIBEYE?

Some sources say Bone-In Ribeyes are referred to as Cowboy Steaks because cowboys would hold on to the bone like a handle. Others say it is because thick-cut ribeyes are big, hearty, and ultra-rugged, ensuring they would satisfy any hard-working cowboy’s appetite.

The heartiness of the steak is the most likely explanation, coinciding with the etymology of both Cowboy Cookies and Cowboy Casserole.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A COWBOY STEAK AND A TOMAHAWK STEAK?

A Tomahawk Steak has an impressively long, frenched rib bone, whereas a Cowboy Steak would likely be thinner cut than a Tomahawk Steak and if there is a bone extending out of the steak, it would not be nearly as long.

HOW BIG IS A COWBOY RIBEYE?

This is completely dependent on the size of the cow and how thick the steak is cut. These steaks can range anywhere from 14 to 24 ounces.

STEAK SAUCES TO TRY



Comments:

  1. Tonauac

    I'm sorry, but I think you are making a mistake. I can prove it.

  2. Briareus

    Bravo, what a phrase ... a great thought



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