Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Prosperity Salad (Yusheng)

Prosperity Salad (Yusheng)

Chef Simone Tong of Little Tong Noodle Shop in New York, who developed this recipe, says: “Also known as Prosperity Toss, this is a Cantonese-style raw salad made with various shredded vegetables and assorted toppings, a sweet plum sauce, and slices of raw fish. Each ingredient has a corresponding auspicious greeting with it. This dish is usually served as an appetizer to raise good luck for the new year by everyone gathering around the dining table and raising their chopsticks to mix the ingredients of the salad together.” Read more about Chinese New Year and find the full menu here.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 Tbsp. toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 tsp. Chinese five-spice powder
  • 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil
  • Vegetable oil (for frying; about 4 cups)
  • 10 square wonton wrappers, cut into ½"-thick strips
  • 4 oz. best-quality salmon, thinly sliced, or 4 oz. sliced smoked or cured salmon
  • 2 medium cucumbers (any kind), cut into matchsticks
  • 2 Asian pears, thinly sliced
  • 2 grapefruit or 1 pomelo, peeled, segmented
  • 1 large carrot, peeled, cut into matchsticks
  • 1 medium daikon, peeled, cut into matchsticks
  • 1 bell pepper (any color), cut into matchsticks

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk plum sauce, soy sauce, sesame seeds, five-spice powder, sesame oil, and cinnamon in a medium bowl; season sauce with salt and set aside.

  • Pour oil into a large skillet to come about halfway up the sides. Heat over medium-high and add 1 wonton strip (this will be your tester to ensure oil is hot). Once wonton begins to sizzle around the edges and starts to shrivel, the oil is hot enough (if you have a deep-fry thermometer, it should register around 350°).

  • Working in batches, fry wonton strips until golden and crisp, 30–45 seconds. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to paper towels to drain.

  • Place salmon in the center of a large platter. Arrange cucumbers, pears, grapefruit, carrot, daikon, bell pepper, ginger, and fried wonton strips around salmon. Drizzle reserved sauce over and toss together with your guests before serving.

Reviews Section

POPPING PEPPERCORNS IN A WOK BY CHEF SARAWAK

Yusheng is getti ng more and more popular amongst Chinese staying
in S.E. Asia, especially for Chinese-Singaporean and Chinese-Malaysian.
I believe there will be more variations coming along and including this recipe.
I will try to avoid using the carrot for this recipe as it is never a hot
tropical land's produce. Instead, I will use the nuts harvest from the
temperate countries.

Yusheng is actually a mixture of cold salad with sashimi, just before
serving, the dressing is added and mixed by everyone using their chopsticks.


Date: Oct 29th, 2017
Recipe: 90 from the 99 tropical vegetables, fruits, spices, and herbs



Ingredients:

Salad
50g Sweet turnip, julienne
50g Coconut palm heart, julienne
50g Unripe mature red papaya, julienne
50g Unripe green papaya, julienne
50g Unripe mature yellowish mango, julienne
50g Cucumber, julienne
50g Pickled daikon, fine julienne (Pickled with red wine vinegar, shallot,
salt, sugar, garlic overnight)
50g Green capsicum, julienne
50g Red capsicum, julienne
50g Yellow capsicum, julienne

50g Cabbage, julienne
100g Salmon, julienne
100g Tuna, julienne
100g Snapper, julienne
100g Lobster, julienne
100g Jellyfish, julienne, rinse with hot water quickly

Garnishing
5 Purple shiso (perilla) leaves, Chiffonade
5g Baby cilantro
5g Parsley, chopped finely
1/2 Ginger torch buds, julienne
2 tbsp Pinenuts, toasted
10 Macadamia nuts, toasted, coarsely grounded
1 tsp Black sesame seeds, toasted
1 tsp White sesame seeds, toasted
2 Kumquat, zest
10g Crispy shallot rings

Dressing
3 tbsp Coconut oil
1 tbsp Olive oil
1 tsp Sesame oil
1 tbsp Fish sauce
3 Kumquat, juice
1 tbsp Chopped palm sugar
1 tbsp Tamarind
2 tbsp Mirin
1 tsp Grated daikon
1 tsp Mashed green olive
1 tsp Mashed Anchovy
1 tsp Ginger juice
TT Salt and pepper



Method:
1. Arrange the salad nicely on a big plate, garnish.
2. Mix the sauce
3. Just before everyone begins to mix the salad together,
pour the dressing over the salad.


Recipe Summary

  • 1/4 cup carrot strips
  • 1/4 cup daikon radish strips
  • 1/4 cup cucumber slices
  • 1 cup yam strips
  • Food coloring
  • 2 tablespoons red pickled ginger
  • 1 peeled pomelo, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/4 pound sashimi salmon, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon toasted chopped peanuts
  • 1 teaspoon five-spice powder
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Pinch of white ground pepper
  • Pok chui crackers
  • 3 tablespoons plum sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Prepare your vegetables using the julienne blade on a mandoline.

To make rosettes of the salmon slices, roll it into a log and pinch one end to make the base.

In a medium sauté pan, heat the oil over high heat. Quickly cook the yam strips. Remove and place them on a paper towel.

Toss 1/3 cup of the yam strips in red food coloring, 1/3 cup in green and 1/3 cup in purple coloring

On a serving platter, place small piles of each vegetable around the rim.

Place the salmon rosettes in the center.

Whisk together the 5-spice powder, cinnamon and white pepper and place the mix in a small serving bowl.

Place the peanuts and sesame seeds into small serving bowls.

Whisk together the plum sauce, rice vinegar and the sesame oil. Place into an small serving bowl.


Yee Sang (Chinese New Year Prosperity Salad)

This Wednesday – the 7th Day of the 15-day Chinese New Year celebration – it’s your birthday! But before you start asking everyone for gifts, it just happens to be their birthday too. According to Chinese legend, humans were created on the 7th Day of the New Year, so to this day, it is celebrated as Renri 人日, which means “Human Day”.

To celebrate together, Chinese families & friends in Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia will enjoy a festive colored salad dish called Yee Sang 鱼生. Everyone will gather around the table, chopsticks in hand, and toss the Yee Sang ingredients up in the air, while saying Lo Hei (toss up), or any well wishes for the New Year.

Yee Sang, or Yusheng, is a mishmash of colorful, auspicious ingredients – shredded veggies like daikon, carrot, cucumber, jicama, and yam slices of raw salmon or mackerel pickled ginger prawn crackers or flour crisps jellyfish mandarin orange or pomelo crushed peanuts and toasted sesame seeds and finally, a sweet & savory dressing made from plum sauce and Chinese Five Spice.

Not exactly chocolate cake with candles on top. But this Prosperity Salad, as Yee Sang is known, is meant to bring you good health and wealth in the upcoming year. And it really is delicious, especially when you create your own version with the ingredients you like best. Like many of the Asian recipes I share here, I give Yee Sang a modern touch, by keeping it simple, healthy, and tasty.


Instead of raw fish, try Alaskan smoked salmon. Skip the jellyfish. Choose just a few veggies to shred/julienne like carrot, jicama, red pepper, cucumber, and green onion. Use whatever citrus fruit you have on hand like grapefruit, mandarin orange, or pomelo. Replace the prawn crackers with crunched up rice crackers. If you like Japanese red pickled ginger, go ahead and add it in. Crushed peanuts and toasted sesame seeds are a must, along with Penang Chinese Five Spice and a pinch of Sichuan Pepper Sea Salt for sprinkling on at the end.

For the dressing, you can just use plum sauce, or a healthier homemade version made with marmalade, lemon & lime juice, soy sauce, honey, and toasted sesame oil.

Enjoy the Yee Sang and remember to Lo Hei. It’s a mess with ingredients flying up in the air, but it’s all in good fun. Happy Chinese Birthday – Happy Human Day! – and may you and your loved ones have a prosperous New Year!


Prosperity toss (yee sang)

This is a dish traditionally eaten at a Lunar New Year feast with the family, a colourful platter of shredded vegetables, pickled ginger and salmon garnished with a tasty sauce.

Preparation

Skill level

Ingredients

  • 100 g wonton wrappers, sliced 1 cm wide
  • vegetable oil to deep fry
  • ¼ cup (40 g) thinly sliced candied ginger
  • 1 thumb sized piece (40g) grated fresh ginger
  • ¼ cup (40 g) thinly sliced pickled ginger
  • 2 tbsp (20 g) julienned red salted ginger *
  • 2 tbsp (20 g) pickled onion, sliced finely
  • 1 cup (100 g) shredded carrot
  • 2 cups (100 g) shredded lettuce
  • 1 cup (100 g) shredded green apple
  • 1 cup (100 g) shredded cucumber
  • 1 medium-large (180 g) turnip, shredded
  • 200 g thinly sliced sashimi salmon
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped coriander
  • 3 green shallots, finely shredded
  • ½ cup (75 g) sesame seeds, toasted
  • ¾ cup (100 g) crushed roasted peanuts
  • ½ tsp five spice powder
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • ½ cup (150 g) Chinese plum sauce*
  • 1½ tbsp soy sauce
  • 2½ tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 tbsp warm water

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

The following recipe has been tested and edited by SBS Food and may differ slightly from the podcast.

Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat until 180ºC. Deep-fry sliced wonton wrappers in small batches until golden and crisp (15–20 seconds per batch). Remove from oil with a mesh skimmer and drain on paper towel.

Arrange all salad ingredients and fried wonton wrappers on a large platter by colour, placing salmon pieces last. Scatter the vegetables with coriander, sesame, peanuts and spices.

Place ingredients for the sauce in a bottle and shake well to combine. Pour sauce over salad in a circular motion. Traditionally, each guest tosses the salad with chopsticks whilst saying auspicious wishes for good prosperity during the coming year.

Note
• Red salted ginger and Chinese plum sauce are available from Chinese food stores.

Photography by Alan Benson. Styling by Michelle Noerianto.


The Prosperous Yu Sheng

Serves: 5 pax Time required: 20mins

2 pieces popiah skin, cut into small strips
15 sashimi-grade salmon slices (

150g)
1 cup shredded Japanese cucumber
1 cup shredded carrot
1 cup shredded purple cabbage
1 cup shredded yam bean
1 cup shredded pear
1 mandarin orange, peeled into segments
6 cherry tomatoes, cut into wedges
2 shallots, thinly sliced
1 handful coriander, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons ground peanuts

Dressing
2 tablespoons plum sauce
3 tablespoons plain water
Juice of 1 lime
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1/4 teaspoon five-spice powder (optional)


The Salad That Invites Wealth

In Chinese communities in Malaysia, the Lunar New Year is celebrated with a dish that promises the coming months will be filled with wealth and prosperity.

The Chinese community in Malaysia is getting ready to welcome the Year of the Ox on February 12. Also known as the Lunar New Year or the Spring Festival, it is arriving amid another round of stringent lockdowns in the country. In a world without the coronavirus, this festival usually means bright red lanterns and pennants fluttering in the warm breeze, exuberant lion dance performances across the city, and sparkling fireworks lighting up the night skies. It also means large groups of friends and families getting together in a celebration that involves traditional food and drinks.

One of the classic dishes is the yee sang (also yu sheng/lou sang), commonly known as the “prosperity salad” since it is believed to bring in good fortune and wealth to those who toss it up. In both Cantonese and Mandarin, New Year greetings include this wish for prosperity—gong hei fat choy and gong xi fa cai (gong-shee fah-tsai) respectively, which loosely translates into “May you become rich!” So, it only makes sense that food customs also invoke wishes for wealth.

The salad is an important part of the Lunar New Year celebrations in Malaysia as well as Singapore, but not so much in China. This is because the yee sang is believed to have originated in the Malaysian trading port of Malacca, brought in by Chinese traders. However, Bee Bee Lim, whose family owns the popular Marco Polo Chinese Cuisine restaurant in Kuala Lumpur, says that the recipe may have been adapted from a salty raw fish dish that existed in the Guangdong province of China called yusheng.

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There are a couple of theories about how yee sang became an integral part of the Chinese community’s New Year celebrations. The Malaysian version is that it was made popular by Loke Ching Fatt, a clever chef in Seremban town, just south of Kuala Lumpur. It was a rather morose period, just after the end of the Japanese occupation of Malaya in the early 1940s, and to attract new customers during the New Year, he rustled up this special dish with over 30 local ingredients. And he succeeded. Neighboring Singapore claims that four Cantonese chefs from the country—highly respected as the Four Heavenly Kings—created the more modern version in 1964 that remains popular to this day.

Yee sang is made of pickled and raw vegetables, and raw fish seasoned generously with sauces and condiments, all of it tossed up together with chopsticks, to the loud cheers of “Lo hei!” (Indeed, in some places, the dish itself has earned the name lo hei, with “hei” meaning “happiness” in Cantonese). Lim says, “The belief is that the higher you can toss it, the more you will prosper. And so, friends and families gather around the dish and keep chanting good wishes for various aspects of life, including abundant wealth, good health, safe travels, work promotions, and so on as they toss it up.”

Each of the ingredients and steps in the process is chosen for its symbolism, which often arises from the different meanings the same word (sound) has in Mandarin. The most common ingredients are raw salmon, on top of a base of thinly-sliced pomelo, carrot, green or white radish, Chinese cucumber, leeks, garnished with peanut crumbs and sesame seeds, crackers, pepper, and five-spice powder, and then sesame oil and plum sauce. All of this is added in neat order, and end up creating a fusion of contrasting tastes as well as textures.

shutterpix/Shutterstock

As each ingredient is added, the guests (or the wait staff at restaurants) recite a wish associated with it. For instance, nian nian you yu (literally meaning “may you always have more than enough”) for abundance from the fish, tian tian mi mi as a wish for a sweet life (love), while adding the plum sauce and during the final shower of crackers, not just for crunch, but also to attract gold into the home, man di huang jin. Indeed, every aspect of this dish is steeped in symbolism, including the color of the seasoning packets—red (pepper) and green (five spice), to indicate good luck and youth, respectively.

Lim also explains that the recipe has undergone several iterations over time, with professional chefs adding more modern touches to make it more interesting. Strawberries or pears, for instance, were never a part of the salad, but now find a place in the dish, to impart a mildly sweet and tart touch. Some restaurants, particularly in Singapore, take it to another level by adding expensive ingredients like baby abalones and even edible gold foil. In Malaysia, though, most recipes tend to stay close to the traditional version, with the Department of National Heritage even adding it to its list of intangible heritage objects.

This year, there may not be large gatherings of friends or colleagues at restaurants to toss lo hei from a large platter. But the dish will still find a place at Chinese homes in Malaysia and Singapore, where families get together to welcome the new year. Or better still, those celebrating will stay safe, and instead, use this app to toss it all up.


Prosperity Salad (Yusheng) - Recipes

January 25th, 2020 begins the Lunar New Year (a.k.a. Chinese New Year, but it’s celebrated in many other Asian countries). It lasts for 15 days.

We were chatting the other day that it’s the Year Of The Rat, an animal which does not evoke pleasant thoughts.

So we looked it up. It turns out that the Chinese word shǔ​ may refer to a rat, mouse, or other muroid. It’s all in the translation.

It turns out that Muroidea are a superfamily of rodents. It includes including gerbils, hamsters, mice, rats, voles and many other relatives. Here’s more about them.

If you’re not happy about living in—or being born in—the Year Of The Rat, pick something that isn’t threatening: a cute gerbil or hamster, for example.


FOOD FOR THE LUNAR NEW YEAR

Whatever your muroid of choice, we’d like to introduce you to a special dish made for the Lunar New Year: yusheng.

The dish is considered a symbol of abundance, prosperity and vigor (here’s more about it).

While it has other names depending on dialect, yusheng translates to “Prosperity Toss,” a Cantonese-style raw fish salad. Sushi lovers, pay attention!

Yusheng is Mandarin Yee-sang is the Cantonese equivalent.

The dish usually consists of strips of raw fish, mixed with shredded vegetables and a variety of sauces and condiments. You can create a vegan version with vegan salmon.

While some versions simply toss all the ingredients together, in the manner of coleslaw. Some cooks build a tower in colored layers, alternating the different vegetables. As people serve themselves, the tower will collapse into a mix of colored strands.

Some of today’s cooks create culinary art, as you can see in the photos.

It can be anything from a dazzling array of artistry to what looks like a festive sashimi platter to plates with some shredded vegetables molded into pandas and teddy bears (a way to get children to eat their vegetables?).

Some artists mold the vegetables into the zodiac animal, as in the [cute] rat in photo #3.


HOW TO MAKE YUSHENG AT HOME

So use your vegetable shredder to shred any fruits or veggies that add to the display of colors and flavors.


[1] Yusheng: sashimi-grade salmon and shredded vegetables. The dish includes pink pomelo (substitute red grapefruit) plus shredded carrot, cucumber, daikon, pickled ginger and yam Here’s the recipe from Evi Abeler | Food & Wine (photo © Evi Abeler).


[2] This version includes different slices of fish: Condiments include plum sauce and toasted-sesame oil, plus Chinese five-spice. Crackers, nuts and seeds are added for crunch (photo © Open Rice).

While versions of yusheng are thought to have existed in China, the contemporary version was created in the 1960s in the Chinese community of Malaysia. It became a Chinese New Year favorite in Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.

Some say the Singaporean version was invented by a Malaysian named Loke Ching Fatt in Seremban, Malaysia in the 1940s

Today, restaurants serve a deluxe version, qicai yusheng, seven-colored raw fish salad. You might mistake it for a deluxe sashimi platter, with several different types of fish.

The current thought is that seven-colored raw fish salad was to created in the 1960s by chefs Lau Yoke Pui, Tham Yui Kai, Sin Leong and Hooi Kok Wai, together known as the Four Heavenly Kings on the Singapore restaurant scene [source].


Prosperity Salad (Yusheng) - Recipes

Yee Sang (Chinese New Year Prosperity Salad)

Everyone will gather around the table, chopsticks in hand, and toss the Yee Sang ingredients up in the air, while saying Lo Hei (toss up), or any well wishes for the New Year.

Yee Sang, or Yusheng, is a mishmash of colorful, auspicious ingredients – shredded veggies like daikon, carrot, cucumber, jicama, and yam slices of raw salmon or mackerel pickled ginger prawn crackers or flour crisps jellyfish mandarin orange or pomelo crushed peanuts and toasted sesame seeds and finally, a sweet & savory dressing made from plum sauce and Chinese Five Spice .

Not exactly chocolate cake with candles on top.

But this Prosperity Salad, as Yee Sang is known, is meant to bring you good health and wealth in the upcoming year. And it really is delicious, especially when you create your own version with the ingredients you like best.

Like many of the Asian recipes I share here, I give Yee Sang a modern touch, by keeping it simple, healthy, and tasty.

Instead of raw fish, try Alaskan smoked salmon. Skip the jellyfish. Choose just a few veggies to shred/julienne like carrot, jicama, red pepper, cucumber, and green onion. Use whatever citrus fruit you have on hand like grapefruit, mandarin orange, or pomelo. Replace the prawn crackers with crunched up rice crackers. If you like Japanese red pickled ginger, go ahead and add it in. Crushed peanuts and toasted sesame seeds are a must, along with Penang Chinese Five Spice and a pinch of Sichuan Pepper Sea Salt for sprinkling on at the end.


Enjoy the Yee Sang and remember to Lo Hei. It’s a mess with ingredients flying up in the air, but it’s all in good fun.

Happy Chinese Birthday – Happy Human Day! – and may you and your loved ones have a prosperous New Year!

Yee Sang (Prosperity Salad) recipe
by Season with Spice
Appetizer for 6 people

Ingredients:
8 oz of salmon sashimi or smoked salmon – sliced thinly into strips
About 1 cup of citrus fruit (e.g. pomelo, honey tangerine, mandarin orange, cara-cara orange or grapefruit) – sliced into chunks
1 carrot – julienned
1 red bell pepper – sliced thinly
1 seedless cucumber – julienned
1/2 small jicama or daikon – thinly sliced
2-3 green onions – thinly sliced into strips
3-4 rice crackers, crushed (or wonton strips)
2 tbsp of Japanese red pickled ginger – cut into small strips
1/2 tsp of Season with Spice’s Penang-style Chinese Five Spice Powder , or to taste*
Pinches of Season with Spice’s Sichuan Pepper Sea Salt , to taste
2 tbsp roasted unsalted peanuts – crushed
1 tbsp of Toasted Sesame Seeds

For the dressing:
Juice from half a lemon
3 tbsp lime juice
1 tbsp soy sauce or tamari
2 tbsp peach, apricot, or orange marmalade
1 tsp grated ginger (optional)
1 tsp toasted sesame oil
2 tbsp honey

Method:
1. Season the salmon with a squeeze of lime juice and a pinch of our Sichuan Pepper Sea Salt.
2. In a bowl, combine all the ingredients for the dressing, and whisk well to mix. If you prefer a thicker sauce, you can add in a cornstarch slurry, and heat up the dressing in a saucepan. Taste and adjust the sweetness according to your preference. Set aside when it’s ready.
3. On a large, round, serving platter, arrange all the ingredients into sections based on colors.
4. When ready to serve, pour the dressing over the salad, and sprinkle on the Penang Chinese Five Spice Powder, Sichuan Pepper Sea Salt, toasted sesame seeds, and crushed peanuts. When everyone at the table is ready with their chopsticks, start to toss the colorful salad into the air together, while making wishes for the New Year. Enjoy!

Notes:
- Suggestions for additional ingredients: slices of green apple, pineapple, mango, seaweed, pickled papaya or even dragon fruit.
* The Penang Five Spice is sprinkled onto the salad for the tossing purpose since Five Spice signifies five blessings. You can mix the spice blend together with the dressing if you like.


YuSheng

Celebrations of Lunar New Year are infused with symbolism, and celebrants wishing to usher in a year filled with good fortune take great care preparing for the festivity. Yusheng is a popular Lunar New Year appetizer for Chinese living in Singapore and Malaysia. It symbolizes abundance, prosperity and good fortune.

Each component of the dish represents these symbols. Raw fish represents its homophone, abundance. Other examples are the pomelo and lime together with raw fish for added luck, shredded radish for eternal youth and crushed peanuts are sprinkled over the dish to suggest a household filled with gold.

Once the yusheng is assembled on the platter, family and friends gather around to perform a ceremony known as a Prosperity Toss, or lo hei. Everyone digs into the salad with their chopsticks and tosses the ingredients into the air while sharing wishes for a prosperous new year. Some say the higher the toss, the greater the fortunes.

Most of the ingredients for this yusheng recipe can be found at large grocery stores and Asian markets. Check with the fishmonger that the salmon is safe to be consumed raw. Serves 6.

Ingredients
1/3 cup plum sauce
2 tablespoon rice vinegar
2 teaspoon sesame oil
2 carrots, peeled
2 daikon radish, peeled
2 cucumbers
6 tablespoon pickled ginger
1 pomelo or grapefruit, peeled, segmented, and membranes removed
1 cup, Pok Chui crackers or fried wonton strips
1 red pepper, cut into thin strips
½ cup seaweed salad
½ pound salmon, sushi-grade
1 teaspoon Chinese Five Spice
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Lime, sliced into wedges
Peanuts, finely chopped
Toasted sesame seeds

Dressing Process
In a small bowl or Mason jar, whisk together plum sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil.

Salad Process
Using julienne blade on a mandoline or a vegetable peeler with teeth rather than a flat blade, slice carrots, radish, and cucumbers into long, thin strips.

To assemble salad
Place each pile of vegetable strips around the edge of a platter. Continue placing the ginger, pomelo or grapefruit segments, crispy wonton skins or Pok Chui crackers, red pepper strips, and seaweed salad in piles around the edge of the platter.

Cut the salmon into thin slices and roll each slice into rosettes. Place rosettes in the middle of the platter.

In another small bowl, combine Chinese Five Spice and cinnamon.

Place limes, chopped peanuts and sesame seeds into small serving bowls.

To serve
Sprinkle sesame seeds, peanuts and spice mixture over salad. Pour dressing over salad. Combine all ingredients and serve with lime wedges.


Watch the video: How to Make Prosperity Salad Yusheng for Lunar New Year (December 2021).