Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Does Jell-O Actually Have Horse's Hooves in It?

Does Jell-O Actually Have Horse's Hooves in It?

There’s a reason why so many people believe this

iStockPhoto

"A Jell-O mold, how exciting!"

On the outside, Jell-O seems like the most benign food in existence. Is there any truth to this?

If your question is, “Is Jell-O made with horse’s hooves?” then the answer is a firm no. But it’s a little more complicated than that.

Gelatin, Jell-O’s primary ingredient, is made of collagen, a protein. You know how your lips get sticky when eating barbecue or another slow-cooked meat? That’s the collagen that’s rendered from connective tissue inside the meat during the cooking process (homemade stock also contains a lot of rendered collagen, which is why it solidifies once chilled). Collagen is actually the most prevalent protein in animals, and is found primarily in bones and skin.

In order to make commercial-grade gelatin, bones and hides of cows and pigs are boiled, cured, treated with acid and alkali, and filtered repeatedly during a multi-week process until the collagen has been thoroughly hydrolyzed, at which point it’s dried, ground, and sifted into a powder. The resulting product is nearly 100 percent protein, and is so pure that it’s not even categorized as an animal product by the federal government.

One part of the animal that doesn’t contain any gelatin? The hoof. That’s made of keratin, a tough protein that’s also the main ingredient in turtle shells and fingernails. You can’t extract collagen from keratin, but it can be turned into a mighty fine glue.


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Home Remedies for Hooves

There are good reasons why home remedies have persisted over time: you always know what’s in them and they don’t cost a fortune. These are both pluses when we’re trying to take good care of our equines. But do they work? Because to be clear, home remedies often take a little more time than just applying something straight out of the bottle, so it’s nice to make sure it’s going to be worth your while to do it.

Scouring the internet and asking people what they’ve concocted for their horse’s feet will give you a variety of potions that run the gamut from the reasonable to the ridiculous. Based on anecdotal evidence, some of the things it seems possible to treat with home brews are:


Watch the video: Worlds Largest Elephant Toothpaste Experiment (December 2021).