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Marcella Hazan, Famed Italian Cookbook Author, Dies at 89

Marcella Hazan, Famed Italian Cookbook Author, Dies at 89

Marcella Hazan died at her home in Flordia

Marcella Hazan with her son, Giuliano.

Marcella Hazan, history-making author of The Classic Italian Cookbook, died Sunday at her home in Florida. She was 89.

“Marcella, my incomparable companion, died this morning a few steps away from her bed. She was the truest and best, and so was her food,” her husband, Victor Hazan, announced on Facebook this morning.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Marcella Hazan was born in Italy and came to the U.S. with a Ph.D. in natural sciences and biology. She initially cooked for her husband, then she began teaching Italian cooking classes out of her New York apartment, and those classes went on to become a lifelong career for both the Hazans. Hazan wrote The Classic Italian Cookbook in 1973, which earned her a reputation for being the Julia Child of Italian cooking.

She went on to write five more books and open cooking schools in Bologna and Venice. The Hazans' son, Giuliano, continues the family tradition by teaching online and out of his cooking school in Verona. His latest cookbook, Hazan Family Favorites, came out earlier this year.

Marcella Hazan's cooking is famous for its commitment to freshness and simplicity. In 2000 she was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the James Beard Foundation.

“I am never bored by a good old dish and I wouldn’t shrink from making something that I first made 50 years ago and my mother, perhaps, 50 years before then,” she wrote. “I don’t cook ‘concepts.’ I use my head, but I cook from the heart, I cook for flavor.”


Marcella Hazan, famed cookbook author, dies

Chef Marcella Hazan, Hazan, the Italian-born cookbook author who taught generations of Americans how to create simple, fresh Italian food, died Sept. 30, 2013 at her home in Florida, according to an email from her son, Giuliano Hazan. She was 89. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File) (Photo: Chris O'Meara, AP)

LONGBOAT KEY, Fla. (AP) — Marcella Hazan, the Italian-born cookbook author who taught generations of Americans how to create simple, fresh Italian food, died Sunday. She was 89.

Hazan died in the morning at her home in Florida, according to an email from her son, Giuliano Hazan, and posts on Facebook and Twitter from her husband and daughter-in-law.

Hazan was best known for her six cookbooks, which were written by her in Italian and translated into English by Victor, her husband of 57 years. The recipes were traditional, tasty and sparse — her famous tomato sauce contained only tomatoes, onion, butter and salt — and mirrored the tastes of her home country, where importance is placed on the freshness of food, rather than the whiz-bang recipes inside a chef's mind.

She eschewed the American-style Italian food that suffocated mushy pasta in grainy meatballs and tasteless cheese. She begged home cooks to use more salt and once wrote that if readers were concerned about salt affecting one's life expectancy, to "not read any further." On the topic of garlic, Hazan took a sharp view.

"The unbalanced use of garlic is the single greatest cause of failure in would-be Italian cooking," she wrote in her 2004 cookbook Marcella Says. ''It must remain a shadowy background presence. It cannot take over the show."

Marcella Pollini was born in 1924 in Cesenatico in the Emilia-Romana region of Italy. She didn't intend to be a professional cooking teacher or author she graduated from the University of Ferrara with a doctorate in natural sciences and biology.

But then she met Victor Hazan, who was born in Italy but raised in New York. The couple married in 1955 and moved to the U.S., and she realized she needed to feed her husband, who longed for the flavors of Italy. One year, she went to take a Chinese cooking class, but the instructor canceled the class the other students decided they wanted Hazan to teach them to cook Italian food.

So she began offering cooking classes from her New York City apartment. Those classes blossomed into a lifelong business of teaching. She and Victor opened a cooking school in Bologna, then in Venice, where classes took place in a 16th century palazzo with a custom designed kitchen.

Hazan gave birth to a son, Giuliano, in 1958. He shared his parents' love of food and also became a cookbook author. Giuliano and his wife run a cooking school in Verona. He also makes frequent visits to the Today show, teaching his mother's recipes. Earlier this year, Giuliano Hazan published Hazan Family Favorites, drawing on his memories of his parents and grandparents and the food they ate for decades.

"The world of cooking has lost a giant today," daughter-in-law Lael Hazan tweeted Sunday afternoon.

It was Hazan's 1973 cookbook, The Classic Italian Cookbook, that led gourmands to draw comparisons between Hazan and another larger-than-life cookbook author: Julia Child.

The two women were longtime friends Child told People Magazine in 1998 that Hazan was "forbidding because she's rough . that's her manner, and she's got a good heart."

In 2000, Hazan was awarded the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award.

Marcella and Victor Hazan retired to a condo on Longboat Key, Fla., in the late 1990s. There, the couple renovated the kitchen, which overlooked the languid blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Punctuated by calls and visits from fans and reporters — and occasionally making appearances in her son's cookbooks and at cooking classes in the northeast — Hazan returned to the thing she loved doing most: cooking for her husband.

On Sunday, Victor Hazan wrote on Facebook: "Marcella, my incomparable companion, died this morning a few steps away from her bed. She was the truest and best, and so was her food."

In 2004, Marcella Hazan wrote, "Simple doesn't mean easy. I can describe simple cooking thus: Cooking that is stripped all the way down to those procedures and those ingredients indispensable in enunciating the sincere flavor intentions of a dish."

Hazan said the Roman dish spaghettini aio e oio — thin spaghetti with garlic, oil, parsley, chili pepper and nothing else — embodies the simple-yet-complex nature of Italian food. Dishes should nourish and please, she added, not "dazzle guests with my originality or creativity."

"I am never bored by a good old dish and I wouldn't shrink from making something that I first made fifty years ago and my mother, perhaps, fifty years before then," she wrote. "I don't cook 'concepts.' I use my head, but I cook from the heart, I cook for flavor."

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


Italian cookbook author Marcella Hazan dies at 89

Hazan lived in Longboat Key, Florida, with her husband and lifelong collaborator and writing partner Victor. Her death was announced by her daughter-in-law Lael Sara Caplan Hazan on her Facebook page.

"The world of authentic home cooking has lost a giant today. My mother-in-law Marcella Hazan, melted away peacefully, my father-in-law Victor, was at her side," Caplan Hazan wrote.

Chefs and celebrities quickly took to Twitter to pay their respects and share their own memories of Hazan and her cookbooks.

Marcella+Hazan+is+gone. I+wore+her+cookbooks+out,+and+continue+to+use+them+what+an+inspiration+she+was.

—+Bette+Midler+(@BetteMidler)+September+30,+2013

Marcella Hazan was born in Italy in 1924, moving to the United States with her husband after World War Two. She claimed that she did not really learn how to cook until she was married and living in New York.

She taught her first cooking class when she was in her mid-40s and the first of her six cookbooks, "The Classic Italian Cookbook," was published when she was nearly 50, according to epicurious.com.

Perhaps her most famous recipe — tomato sauce — exemplified her culinary philosophy of simplicity. It required a can of peeled plum tomatoes, five tablespoons of unsalted butter, one small white onion and salt.

Asked in an interview with epicurious.com what she believed the keys to success were for the home cook was, she replied "taste. That is very important. They don't have to do very complicated things. And good ingredients."

Among the garlands she received over a long career as both a cookery teacher and author were a James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award and a knighthood in her native Italy.


Marcella Hazan, Beloved Italian Cookbook Author, Dies At 89

The food world lost one of its most enduring figureheads over the weekend when legendary cookbook author Marcella Hazan passed away at age 89 at her home in Florida. A mentor to both luminaries in the professional culinary world as well as home cooks across the nation, Hazan brought simple, unaffected Italian food to the US through a series of six cookbooks, beginning with her seminal The Classic Italian Cook Book, published in 1973. She championed salt, scolded the overuse of garlic and famously made her tomato sauce with just tomatoes, onion and butter.

An immigrant who moved to Queens from Italy in 1955, Hazan was horrified by the Americanized interpretations of Italian cuisine. Though not a cook herself, Hazan was determined to bring the fresh flavors of Italy to her new home in the United States. On top of her lack of cooking skills, Hazan also spoke no English her husband, Victor, actually translated her cooking notes into English recipes. She eventually learned the language by watching television and "following the Brooklyn Dodgers," according to the Times.

The widespread popularity of Italian food in this country can largely be traced back to the Hazans. "Because the Hazans championed fresh vegetables many people had never heard of (artichokes, fennel), olive oil and—above all—simplicity and clarity in cooking, they can be argued to have had even more influence on how Americans cook than Julia Child," declares Corby Kummer at Bloomberg. In 2000, Hazan received the James Beard Lifetime Achievement Award.

Hazan is survived by Victor, her husband of 57 years her son Giuliano Hazan, who also teaches cooking and her two granddaughters.

The world of cooking has lost a giant today. My mother-in-law Marcella Hazan melted away peacefully, my father in law at her side.

— Lael Hazan (@educatedpalate) September 29, 2013

She's also survived by the culinary world at large, who lost their guiding light in the joy of Italian cuisine.

I met Marcella Hazan when I first started cooking and she made me obscenely buttered toast with fresh sardines. I'll never forget. RIP

— alex guarnaschelli (@guarnaschelli) September 29, 2013

more than anyone, marcella hazan brought italian flavors to the US. her books continue to inspire. a true chef's chef. she will be missed

— Mario Batali (@Mariobatali) September 29, 2013

The great Marcella Hazan is gone. RIP. Making her tomato sauce now. When I said how much I loved it she replied "The one with the honion?"

— ruthreichl (@ruthreichl) September 29, 2013

Marcella Hazan is gone. I wore her cookbooks out, and continue to use them what an inspiration she was.

— Bette Midler (@BetteMidler) September 30, 2013


Culinary World Mourns the Death of Cookbook Author Marcella Hazan

Born in 1924 in the town of Cesenatico, Italy, Hazan reportedly wrote in her native tongue, then her husband, Victor, translated Hazan's books into English. Her entrée into the culinary world was a happy accident. After moving to the U.S., Hazan decided to take a Chinese cooking class, but when the instructor didn't show up, she wound up teaching the students Italian cuisine, reports the Associated Press. Soon she was teaching classes in her home in New York City. After her business boomed, Hazan and her husband opened a cooking school in Bologna, then followed up with one in Venice.

Hazan was able to call Julia Child one of her close friends and in 2000 she received a Lifetime Achievement Award by the James Beard Foundation. Hazan was probably best known for her focus on un-fussy cooking. However, she did not consider her style to be without complexity. According to the Associated Press, in 2004 Hazan wrote, "Simple doesn't mean easy. I can describe simple cooking: Cooking that is stripped all the way down to those procedures and those ingredients indispensable in enunciating the sincere flavor intentions of a dish."

"The impact Mrs. Hazan had on the way America cooks Italian food is impossible to overstate. Even people who have never heard of Marcella Hazan cook and shop differently because of her," the New York Times notes. Hazan was easily considered a master by many of her peers. "She was the first mother of Italian cooking in America," Lidia Bastianch told the New York Times. But British chef April Bloomfield probably said it best in her 2012 cookbook, A Girl and Her Pig: "Marcella Hazan is a hero of mine &mdash A deity, really."

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Marcella Hazan, famed cookbook author, dies at 89

LONGBOAT KEY, Fla. &mdash Marcella Hazan, the Italian-born cookbook author who taught generations of Americans how to create simple, fresh Italian food, died Sunday. She was 89.

Hazan died in the morning at her home in Florida, according to an email from her son, Giuliano Hazan, and posts on Facebook and Twitter from her husband and daughter-in-law.

Hazan was best known for her six cookbooks, which were written by her in Italian and translated into English by Victor, her husband of 57 years. The recipes were traditional, tasty and sparse &mdash her famous tomato sauce contained only tomatoes, onion, butter and salt &mdash and mirrored the tastes of her home country, where importance is placed on the freshness of food, rather than the whiz-bang recipes inside a chef&rsquos mind.

She eschewed the American-style Italian food that suffocated mushy pasta in grainy meatballs and tasteless cheese. She begged home cooks to use more salt and once wrote that if readers were concerned about salt affecting one&rsquos life expectancy, to &ldquonot read any further.&rdquo On the topic of garlic, Hazan took a sharp view.

&ldquoThe unbalanced use of garlic is the single greatest cause of failure in would-be Italian cooking,&rdquo she wrote in her 2004 cookbook &ldquoMarcella Says…&rdquo &ldquoIt must remain a shadowy background presence. It cannot take over the show.&rdquo

Marcella Pollini was born in 1924 in Cesenatico in the Emilia-Romana region of Italy. She didn&rsquot intend to be a professional cooking teacher or author she graduated from the University of Ferrara with a doctorate in natural sciences and biology.

But then she met Victor Hazan, who was born in Italy but raised in New York. The couple married in 1955 and moved to the U.S., and she realized she needed to feed her husband, who longed for the flavors of Italy. One year, she went to take a Chinese cooking class, but the instructor canceled the class the other students decided they wanted Hazan to teach them to cook Italian food.

So she began offering cooking classes from her New York City apartment. Those classes blossomed into a lifelong business of teaching. She and Victor opened a cooking school in Bologna, then in Venice, where classes took place in a 16th century palazzo with a custom-designed kitchen.

Hazan gave birth to a son, Giuliano, in 1958. He shared his parents&rsquo love of food and also became a cookbook author. Giuliano and his wife run a cooking school in Verona. He also makes frequent visits to the &ldquoToday Show,&rdquo teaching his mother&rsquos recipes. Earlier this year, Giuliano Hazan published &ldquoHazan Family Favorites,&rdquo drawing on his memories of his parents and grandparents and the food they ate for decades.

It was Hazan&rsquos 1973 cookbook, &ldquoThe Classic Italian Cookbook,&rdquo that led food lovers to draw comparisons between Hazan and another larger-than-life cookbook author: Julia Child.

The two women were longtime friends Child told People Magazine in 1998 that Hazan was &ldquoforbidding because she&rsquos rough … that&rsquos her manner, and she&rsquos got a good heart.&rdquo

In 2000, Hazan was awarded the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award.

Marcella and Victor Hazan retired to a condo on Longboat Key, Fla., in the late 1990s. There, the couple renovated the kitchen, which overlooked the languid blue waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Punctuated by calls and visits from fans and reporters &mdash and occasionally making appearances in her son&rsquos cookbooks and at cooking classes in the northeast &mdash Hazan returned to the thing she loved doing most: cooking for her husband.

On Sunday, Victor Hazan wrote on Facebook: &ldquoMarcella, my incomparable companion, died this morning a few steps away from her bed. She was the truest and best, and so was her food.&rdquo

In 2004, Marcella Hazan wrote, &ldquoSimple doesn&rsquot mean easy. I can describe simple cooking thus: Cooking that is stripped all the way down to those procedures and those ingredients indispensable in enunciating the sincere flavor intentions of a dish.&rdquo

Hazan said the Roman dish spaghettini aio e oio &mdash thin spaghetti with garlic, oil, parsley, chili pepper and nothing else &mdash embodies the simple-yet-complex nature of Italian food. Dishes should nourish and please, she added, not &ldquodazzle guests with my originality or creativity.&rdquo

&ldquoI am never bored by a good old dish and I wouldn&rsquot shrink from making something that I first made fifty years ago and my mother, perhaps, fifty years before then,&rdquo she wrote. &ldquoI don&rsquot cook &lsquoconcepts.&rsquo I use my head, but I cook from the heart, I cook for flavor.&rdquo


Marcella Hazan dies at 89 Italian cookbook author, teacher

For Marcella Hazan, Italian food wasn’t spaghetti and meatballs or pizza buried in cheese, and, in fact, never really existed as a simple meal on a red-checked tablecloth. The food of her native land was really the food of individual regions that through the ages had been independent, sometimes hostile, and certainly not prone to mimicking their enemies’ cuisine at the family dinner table.

She made it her life’s work to preserve and innovate recipes that reflected the best of regional cooking in Italy and in the process introduced legions of Americans to the true foods of her native land.

A straight-talking cookbook author and teacher, Hazan died Sunday at her home in Longboat Key, Fla., said her husband, Victor. She was 89 and had been in failing health for several months.

Hazan, who was born in a small Italian fishing village on the Adriatic Sea and moved to New York City in the late 1950s after her marriage, was revered in the food world and beloved by home cooks, who found her earthy advice to be bracing and her recipes to be both doable and delicious.

Julia Child once called Hazan “my mentor in all things Italian.” The New York Times’ Craig Claiborne, who discovered Hazan when, as she recalled, “my cooking had been simply of the wifely and motherly kind,” called her “a national treasure.”

In 2000 she was given the James Beard Foundation’s lifetime achievement award, one of cooking’s highest honors.

Hazan’s “The Classic Italian Cook Book,” published in 1973, and “More Classic Italian Cooking” (1978) were updated and combined into “Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking” in 1992. All of them admonished home cooks to start with only the best ingredients: the freshest vegetables, fruits and herbs the highest-quality meats, poultry and fish.

“Marcella Hazan has been one of the most influential teachers and cookbook writers of her generation,” said Nach Waxman, owner of Kitchen Arts and Letters in New York City. Along with Child and a few other serious cookbook writers, he said, Hazan “helped lead us away from the all-too-frequently slipshod and compromised cut-and-paste foreign cookbooks of the post-World War II period.”

Hazan gave detailed instructions — often many illustrated pages long — on how to turn these ingredients into the ravioli al plin, pork loin braised in milk, risotto con funghi e le mandorle and many other dishes that she remembered from growing up in Italy.

Hazan did not believe in masking good food with too much seasoning or heavy sauces, dismissing the latter as “wet food.” She decried the overuse of garlic and would walk out of a restaurant that smelled too strongly of it.

In her classes and cookbooks, she urged home cooks to be more daring. She instructed them on the difference between any old olive oil and truly fine olive oil, and taught the fine points of when — and when not — to use such things as an expensive balsamic vinegar.

“What you keep out is as significant as what you put in,” she wrote in her 1997 cookbook “Marcella Cucina.”

Hazan once wrote that she felt a passion not just for good food but for the hands-on process of preparing it. She once said that “80% of Italian cooking is done in a saute pan.” Even cooking in an oven put her “at a distance.”

“I need to smell its smells, to hear its sounds, to see food in a pot that simmers, bubbles, sizzles,” she wrote in “Marcella Cucina.” “I enjoy the physical involvement of stirring, turning, poking, mashing, scraping.”

Her recipes had measurements, but she didn’t use them when she was the one cooking.

“Taste, texture, time” was her mantra.

Hazan was born Marcella Polini on April 15, 1924, in Cesenatico, Italy. As she grew up, her family of landowners moved about Italy and had a maid who prepared their meals.

Hazan showed no interest in the kitchen a scientist, she earned two doctorates in biology and natural sciences at the University of Ferrara.

In 1953, she met Victor Hazan, an Italian who had moved to the United States as a boy in 1939. The couple met in Italy, and Hazan soon found herself married and living in New York, where she tried to please a husband who adored good food.

“Victor can cope with many bad things in life, but he cannot cope with a bad meal,” Hazan would say.

Using a cookbook by Ada Boni, who then set the standard for Italian cuisine, Hazan honed her skills in a small kitchen.

When her son was a child, she enrolled in a cooking class given by Grace Chu, who introduced many Americans to fine Chinese cooking.

Soon Hazan’s classmates were urging her to teach them Italian cooking. She charged $80 for beginner classes in her apartment — a fraction of what her later courses would cost.

Word got around, reaching the New York Times’ Claiborne in the fall of 1970. When he called, Hazan did not know who he was but invited him to share lunch with her and Victor.

She prepared tortelloni di biete (tortelloni with Swiss chard filling), spaghetti all’ortolana (spaghetti with eggplant) and artichokes Roman-style. Claiborne included the recipes in the story headlined, “There Was a Time She Couldn’t Cook.”

“When the article appeared, she was dumbfounded,” Claiborne told Los Angeles Times food writer Russ Parsons 20 years later. “She became well-known to the general public of New York almost instantly.”

Eager home cooks flocked to her doorstep in New York and later to schools in Bologna and Venice.

As her career took off, her husband, who had been working in his family’s furrier business, partnered with her to produce some of the most successful cookbooks of their time.

Marcella would cook and recook her recipes, carefully gauging her husband’s reaction. Victor, an authority on Italian wine who wrote well-regarded books of his own, would translate her recipes from Italian and write for the cookbook. No one who knew the Hazans thought of one without thinking of the other.

“In a way, all the cookbooks have been outgrowths of the eager, affectionate conversations about the day’s meals that the two of them had in their first New York apartment,” food writer Anne Mendelson wrote in reviewing “Marcella Cucina” for the L.A. Times.

With Hazan’s first efforts at codifying recipes, she struggled to identify appropriate substitutions for the finer ingredients used in Italy. But by the time “Marcella Cucina” was published, home cooks were demanding and getting the extra virgin olive oil, radicchio and other products that had not previously been available.

Eventually, Marcella’s success led the Hazans back to Italy. For years, she taught in the kitchen of a converted 16th-century palazzo in the Cannaregio section of Venice where the couple lived, shopping at the city’s open-air Rialto market.

In recent years, Hazan lived with her husband in Florida, near their son, Giuliano, a chef and also a cookbook author. Both survive her, as do two grandchildren.

Luther is a former Times staff writer.

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Marcella Hazan, famed author of Italian cookbooks, dies at 89

LONGBOAT KEY, Fla. &mdash Marcella Hazan, the Italian-born cookbook author who taught generations of Americans how to create simple, fresh Italian food, died Sunday. She was 89.

Hazan died at her home in Florida, according to an e-mail from her son, Giuliano Hazan, and posts on Facebook and Twitter from her husband and daughter-in-law.

Hazan was best known for her six cookbooks, which were written by her in Italian and translated into English by Victor, her husband of 57 years.

The recipes were traditional, tasty and sparse &mdash her famous tomato sauce contained only tomatoes, onion, butter and salt &mdash and mirrored the tastes of her home country, where importance is placed on the freshness of food, rather than the whiz-bang recipes inside a chef’s mind.

It was Hazan’s 1973 cookbook, “The Classic Italian Cookbook,” that led gourmands to draw comparisons between Hazan and another larger-than-life cookbook author: Julia Child.

The two women were friends. Child told People Magazine in 1998 that Hazan was “forbidding because she’s rough … that’s her manner, and she’s got a good heart.” In 2000, Hazan was awarded the James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award.


Cookbook Author Marcella Hazan Dies at 89

Legendary cookbook author Marcella Hazan died this weekend at the age of 89. Along with her husband Victor, Hazan wrote six cookbooks over the course of her lifetime, including the seminal Classic Italian Cook Book. Hazan, who was born in Italy, dedicated her career to encouraging Americans to cook what she saw as proper Italian food, as opposed to the bastardized American versions of it she found upon moving to the States. On Facebook yesterday, Victor Hazan posted, "Marcella, my incomparable companion, died this morning a few steps away from her bed. She was the truest and the best, and so was her food."

Hazan published her first cookbook, The Classic Italian Cook Book, in 1973, and its impact on Italian cooking in this country cannot be overemphasized. She was award a James Beard Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000, and to this day her books are often compared to those of Julia Child in terms of influence.

Hazan would write cooking notes in Italian which her husband then translated into comprehensible English recipes in 2008 the New York Times called the fact that Victor Hazan "every word of English in Ms. Hazan's books. the worst kept secret in cooking." Hazan also taught cooking classes, which is how Craig Claiborne first heard of her back in the 70s, and was occasionally on television. In fact, April Bloomfield filmed part of her upcoming season Mind of a Chef with Hazan. (Apparently the matching shirts below were a total coincidence.)

Hazan was known for her strong will (and her love for whiskey and cigarettes). She spent a lifetime trying to get Americans to cook simple Italian food with seasonal vegetables, more salt and less garlic. Her most famous recipes include those for fresh pasta, her ragu bolognese, and a tomato sauce made with onions and butter. Hazan influenced chefs and home cooks alike. Mario Batali told the Times, "I didn't pay attention to Julia Child like everyone else said they did. I paid attention to Marcella Hazan."

Twitter Remembrances

The world of cooking has lost a giant today. My mother-in-law Marcella Hazan melted away peacefully, my father in law at her side.

— Lael Hazan (@educatedpalate) September 29, 2013

more than anyone, marcella hazan brought italian flavors to the US. her books continue to inspire. a true chef's chef. she will be missed

— Mario Batali (@Mariobatali) September 29, 2013

I met Marcella Hazan when I first started cooking and she made me obscenely buttered toast with fresh sardines. I'll never forget. RIP

— alex guarnaschelli (@guarnaschelli) September 29, 2013

Very very sad to hear the passing of Marcella Hazan .My thoughts are with the her family . You touched my soul .RIP darling Marcella

— April Bloomfield (@AprilBloomfield) September 29, 2013

In Italy w John for our anniversary & just heard the sad news Marcella Hazan has passed. We will remember her in our hearts & our food.

— rachael ray (@rachael_ray) September 29, 2013

The great Marcella Hazan is gone. RIP. Making her tomato sauce now. When I said how much I loved it she replied "The one with the honion?"

— ruthreichl (@ruthreichl) September 29, 2013

Italian cookbook author Marcella Hazan dies at 89

(Reuters) - Marcella Hazan, whose cookbooks brought the rich taste of authentic Italian food into kitchens across the United States, has died at the age of 89, her family said. Hazan lived in Longboat Key, Florida, with her husband and lifelong collaborator and writing partner Victor. Her death was announced by her daughter-in-law Lael Sara Caplan Hazan on her Facebook page. "The world of authentic home cooking has lost a giant today. My mother-in-law Marcella Hazan, melted away peacefully, my father-in-law Victor, was at her side," Caplan Hazan wrote. Marcella Hazan was born in Italy in 1924, moving to the United States with her husband after World War Two. She claimed that she did not really learn how to cook until she was married and living in New York. She taught her first cooking class when she was in her mid-40s and the first of her six cookbooks, "The Classic Italian Cookbook," was published when she was nearly 50, according to epicurious.com. Perhaps her most famous recipe - tomato sauce - exemplified her culinary philosophy of simplicity. It required a can of peeled plum tomatoes, five tablespoons of unsalted butter, one small white onion and salt. Asked in an interview with epicurious.com what she believed the keys to success were for the home cook was, she replied "taste. That is very important. They don't have to do very complicated things. And good ingredients." Among the garlands she received over a long career as both a cookery teacher and author were a James Beard Foundation Lifetime Achievement Award and a knighthood in her native Italy. (Reporting by Tim Gaynor Editing by Mary Wisniewski and Eric Walsh)

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Some teenagers and young adults who received Covid vaccines experienced heart inflammation, a US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention advisory group said, recommending further study of the rare condition. The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunisation Practices in a statement dated May 17 said it had looked into reports that a few young vaccine recipients - predominantly male, adolescents and young adults - developed myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle. The condition often goes away without complications and can be caused by a variety of viruses, the CDC group said. CDC monitoring systems had not found more cases than would be expected in the population, but members of the committee on vaccinations felt that healthcare providers should be made aware of the reports of the "potential adverse event", the committee said. It did not say how many people had been affected and recommended further investigation. Dr Amesh Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Centre for Health Security, said vaccines are known to cause myocarditis and it would be important to monitor to see if it is causally related to the vaccine. It is important to look at the risk-benefit ratio, he said: "Vaccines are going to unequivocally be much more beneficial outweighing this very low, if conclusively established, risk." The CDC said the cases typically occurred within four days after receiving the mRNA vaccines. It did not specify which vaccines. The United States has given emergency authorisation to two mRNA vaccines, from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech. Israel's Health Ministry in April said it was examining a small number of cases of heart inflammation in people who had received Pfizer's vaccine, although it had not yet drawn any conclusions. Most of the cases in Israel were reported among people up to age 30. Pfizer at the time said it had not observed a higher rate of the condition than would normally be the case in the general population and that a causal link to the vaccine had not been established. Pfizer and Moderna did not immediately respond to requests for comment on Saturday. The CDC in late April, after news of the Israeli investigation, said it did not see a link between the two. Earlier this month US regulators expanded authorisation of Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine to children aged 12 to 15.

Simone Biles nailed a vault so dangerous that no woman had ever tried it in competition before her

Simone Biles became the first woman to attempt - or complete - a Yurchenko double pike during competition at the US Classic Saturday night.


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