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Brisket Is Good for You, Scientist Says

Brisket Is Good for You, Scientist Says

A Texas A&M scientist has concluded that consuming brisket regularly can help raise levels of the good kind of cholesterol

Moms everywhere breathe a sigh of relief: Sunday night’s brisket and gravy is safe.

Brisket — a staple of Crock-Pot dinners and Southern barbecue championships — may seem like a sinful temptation, but according to new research, it’s actually pretty healthy for you. Stephen Smith, a researcher at Texas A&M AgriLife, found that the meat, which has high levels of oleic acid, may increase our levels of HDL, also known as “good cholesterol.”

“Brisket has higher oleic acid than the flank or plate, which are the trims typically used to produce ground beef,” Smith told Food & Wine. “Americans consume over 50 percent of their beef as ground beef.”

Other well-known healthy foods with high levels of oleic acid include olive oil, avocados, and peanut oil.

Japanese black cattle, especially American Wagyu beef, have especially high levels of oleic acid. In studies administered by Smith, participants were fed brisket patties five nights a week, and most participants experienced improvement in their cholesterol levels.

“Ground beef is not going to kill you,” Smith said in a statement. “When you take the beef out of fat, it reduces LDL, but also reduces HDL. Our studies have shown that fat is a very important component of beef.”


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. 


Science Says Playing Mahjong Could Supercharge Your Mental Health

People have been playing this board game for hundreds of years, but it seems that it may be more of a brain booster than we originally thought.

Mahjong was born in China in the 19th century, having spawned from many different variations of similar games that were played in ancient societies for hundreds of years. But it wasn&apost until the 1920s that the game of intense strategy and skill made its way to the United States. When it did, though, it was a hit: A Stanford University report says many Americans from different cultures immediately took to the game. But unlike other beloved board games, new research published in the journal Social Science & Medicine suggests that mahjong might provide players with more than just a fun reason to gather with friends. 

According to research conducted by a team at the University of Georgia, mahjong players who regularly broke out their tile sets enjoyed reduced depression rates among middle-aged and elder Chinese adults. Per the research, the game of skill is a challenging hobby that can help keep your brain sharp, but the social aspect of mahjong may also impact holistic mental health overall. Researchers discovered the powerful link by studying different social activities and their influence on mental health in a Chinese population sample, with the help of scientists from Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China.