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Eric Ripert Introduces Vegetarian Tasting Menu at Le Bernardin

Eric Ripert Introduces Vegetarian Tasting Menu at Le Bernardin

Le Bernardin is known for seafood, but a new menu is perfect for vegetarians

Chef Eric Ripert is introducing a vegetarian tasting menu at Le Bernardin.

Le Bernardin, chef Eric Ripert’s three-Michelin-starred New York restaurant, is known primarily for its seafood, but it’s about to start offering a new tasting menu, and for the first time, all eight courses on the menu will be entirely vegetarian.

According to the New York Times, Eric Ripert says Le Bernardin’s customers have been asking for a vegetarian tasting menu for some time, and he sees the vegetable-centric menu as an artistic challenge.

“I often get a dozen inquiries a week for a vegetable tasting,” he told the Times’ Florence Fabricant. “I like the idea of a menu that pays homage to the vegetable, though it’s a creative challenge.”

Like the seafood-centric Le Bernardin tasting menu that was already available, the new vegetarian tasting menu will include six savory courses and two desserts. Some of the dishes on the vegetarian menu include a tagliatelle pasta with black truffles, and eggplant served with porcini mushrooms. The vegetarian tasting menu is $185 per person, not including wine pairings, which is the same price as the regular Le Bernardin tasting menu. This is the first time Le Bernardin has offered a vegetarian tasting menu, and vegetable-focused meals are one of our predictions for the biggest food trends of 2018.


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Share All sharing options for: Is a Buddhist Nun Making the World’s ‘Most Exquisite’ Food?

Pickled lotus root, sea trumpet and white radish, prepared by Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan. Jackie Nickerson

Is a woman with a vegan arsenal of ingredients, a limited audience, and no professional culinary training one of the world's top chefs? This is the question author Jeff Gordinier poses in a profile of Zen Buddhist nun Jeong Kwan, featured this week's issue of T Magazine. Kwan lives and cooks in a secluded monastery several hours outside of Seoul, carrying out centuries-old Buddhist culinary traditions including fermentation, dehydration, foraging, and seasonality in relative obscurity. Yet her techniques and approach to cooking have captured the attention of prominent Western chefs such as Eric Ripert and Rene Redzepi.

Ripert himself introduced food and travel writers, including Eater's Hillary Dixler, to Kwan's temple cuisine during a private tasting at Le Bernardin last February. Her dishes are designed to be nourishing, temporary, and not "craveable." They often combine " what's freshly plucked with what's patiently funkified" and are notably absent of onion and garlic, ingredients that some Buddhists believe stimulate the libido. The author writes:

According to Gordinier, Kwan began her culinary journey when she joined the Zen order at 19 and realized that the best way for her to share her the Buddhist philosophy was by "communicating with sentient beings through the medium of food." At the monastery she spends her days cultivating a garden and becoming close to her food in order to produce the best flavors. "Let nature take care of it," she says.

Jeong Kwan resides at the Chunjinam hermitage of the Baekyangsa temple, several hours south of Seoul. [All photos: Jackie Nickerson/T Magazine]


Watch the video: Eric Riperts Caviar-Blinged Croque Monsieur - Savvy Ep. 17 (December 2021).