Fried Green Tomatoes

Ali Rosen

Fried Green Tomatoes

Fried green tomatoes are a classic, but few people outside of the South attempt to make them. However, it's a versatile dish that is incredibly easy to make — they're great as a side dish, on top of a burger or sandwich, or as an appetizer. And kids tend to love them, too, so they are an easy addition to any family meal.

The key to this dish is that the green tomatoes are more solid than riper tomatoes, and they hold up better to frying. Make sure to serve them piping hot and try to stick to Southern tradition by having a bit of pimento cheese on the side.

Click here to see Green Tomatoes for Everyone.

Notes

Note: The canola oil can be replaced with any flavorless oil suitable for high-temperature cooking. If you want to add a bit of smoky flavor, you can also replace the oil with bacon fat.

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup cornmeal
  • 2 Teaspoons paprika
  • 1 Teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 Teaspoon salt
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 Cup canola oil
  • 2 green tomatoes, sliced, top and bottom pieces discarded
  • 1/2 Cup pimento cheese, for serving (optional)

Lighten Up Fried Green Tomatoes

Get that familiar golden crunch of fried green tomatoes with heart-healthy oil and a nonstick pan in this lighter recipe of the Southern classic.

Fried Green Tomatoes
Makes: about 20 slices Hands-On Time: 30 min. Total Time: 40 min.

4 medium-size green tomatoes (about 1 1/3 lb.)
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. pepper
1 cup self-rising white cornmeal mix
½ cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
½ cup all-purpose flour
4 egg whites
3 Tbsp. olive oil

1. Cut tomatoes into ½-inch-thick slices sprinkle with salt and pepper. Let stand 10 minutes.
2. Combine cornmeal mix and panko in a shallow dish or pie plate. Place flour in a second shallow dish or pie plate. Whisk egg whites in a medium bowl until foamy. Dredge tomato slices in flour, shaking off excess. Dip in egg whites, and dredge in cornmeal mixture.
3. Cook half of tomato slices in 1½ Tbsp. hot oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat 4 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Season with salt to taste. Place on a wire rack in a jelly-roll pan, and keep warm in a 225° oven. Repeat procedure with remaining tomato slices and oil.
Per Tomato Slice: CALORIES 65 FAT 2.2G (SAT 0.3G, MONO 1.6G, POLY 0.2G) PROTEIN 2.1G CARB 9.3G FIBER 0.6G CHOL 0MG IRON 0.5MG SODIUM 157MG CALC 16MG

Skinny Dips
Each of these low-fat sauces can be stirred together in 10 minutes. Chill 1 hour, and store in an airtight container in the fridge up to 3 days.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 green tomatoes, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ⅓ cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup plain panko bread crumbs
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon paprika
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, or as needed

Season tomato slices with salt and pepper.

Set up a breading station in 3 shallow dishes: pour flour into the first dish stir together buttermilk and eggs in the second dish and mix breadcrumbs, cornmeal, garlic powder, and paprika together in the third dish.

Dredge tomato slices in flour, shaking off the excess. Dip tomatoes into the egg mixture, and then into the bread crumb mixture, making sure to coat both sides.

Preheat the air fryer to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). Brush the fryer basket with olive oil. Place breaded tomato slices in the fryer basket, making sure they do not touch each other cook in batches if necessary. Brush the tops of tomatoes with olive oil.

Cook for 12 minutes, then flip the tomatoes and brush again with olive oil. Cook until crisp and golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove tomatoes to a paper towel-lined rack to keep crisp. Repeat with remaining tomatoes.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 green tomatoes, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons salt, divided
  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper, divided
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 1 teaspoon dried parsley
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 cups canola oil, or as needed
  • ½ cup ranch dressing
  • 2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning
  • 2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce

Season tomato slices with salt and pepper.

Combine flour, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper in a shallow bowl. Pour buttermilk in a second shallow bowl. Mix cornmeal, parsley, paprika, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, and cayenne pepper in a third shallow bowl.

Dredge each tomato slice in the flour mixture to coat, dip into the buttermilk, and finish by pressing each side of the tomato into the cornmeal mixture to coat. Lay coated tomato slices onto a baking sheet rest to let tomatoes absorb flavor of coating, 10 to 15 minutes.

Heat oil in a deep-fryer or large saucepan to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Gently drop tomato slices into the hot oil and cook until golden brown and floating, 2 to 3 minutes. Drain on a plate lined with paper towel.

Whisk ranch dressing, cajun seasoning, and hot pepper sauce together in a small bowl serve with the fried tomato slices.


How about the ratio of flour cornmeal? I do prefer corn meal which is ground well and spicy. have you ever tried ground Parmesan, and pepper after soaking in the batter?

I treat myself to Fried Green Tomatoes once or twice a year - LOVE them! This recipe is close to how I've always made mine, with a few exceptions: 1) I add garlic salt to the flour to add a little flavor 2) I dip them in milk before the flour (helps the flour stick evenly) 3) I use breadcrumbs instead of cornmeal. I find cornmeal (even fine) to be too gritty. I find the key to perfect FGTs is getting truly green (and very firm) tomatoes, and finding the perfect thickness for you (too thin and they can get soggy too thick and they're, well, too thick! :) ).


Reviews

Meh. I prefer a 50/50 ratio of flour and cornmeal. Also, while the paprika is okay. I prefer just salt & pepper and/or the addition of a little cayenne pepper or even an Italian seasoning blend.

Great recipe. Changed it up a little and used !/2 cup of the cornmeal and 1/2 cup of panko bread crumbs. I soaked my tomato slices all night in buttermilk and dipped in batter and fried in bacon grease. They were incredible. Thanks for the recipe!!

I really loved this recipe. I followed it exactly, including the smoked paprika, which amazingly I had! Used Canola oil & it was fine. Next time I think I will add a little corn flour just to see if I like it better. We kept the left-overs & heated them in tin foil in the oven, and they were just as good the second time. Yum!

Fried green tomatoes are a heritage dish with lots of recipes. The simplest are often he closest to history and also the best. This recipe has two flaws. First, while I understand the intent of the egg, it isn't necesary. The tomatoes will coat with the corn meal without the egg, and with far less mess than the egg causes. Second, the seasoning is most easily integrated into the corn meal, rather than onto the tomatoes prior to breading. Fried green tomatoes originated as a simple and delicious dish that is difficult to mess up. This recipe is unnecessarily complicated.

This is good - very much how I know our southern and Texan relatives to cook them (they don't use breadcrumbs!). However, I think the cornmeal crust is improved by a very light flour dredge before the egg - then the cornmeal mixture. I also prefer them with a little more than paprika for spice - a little Old Bay or Creole seasoning sets off the tartness is the tomatoes!

really good and easy. i followed this recipe and made the basil mayo from another way too complicated looking fried green tomato recipe. I used peanut oil which helped keep things from getting burned.

I haven't tried this recipe but it's nearly identical to what I do w/green tomatoes every time I'm lucky enough to find them. I also think that cutting them a little thinner is a good idea so that they cook through and are not so bitter. Sometimes I throw caution to the winds and saute them in bacon drippings - now we're talking southern!

I cut the recipe in half to try it and I used a bunch of spices (Thyme, Rosemary, garlic powder, cumin, chili pepper). I added the salt and pepper to the corn meal mixture and also sprinkled on top as they were cooking. They were so yummy! No need for a topping.

Living in the serious north (Edmonton, AB) each fall is a race between the ripening and the winter so we searched for recipes for FGT and found this one. They were pretty tasty, although a little tart. I have since added different spices to the cornmeal and think that is the way to go, don't be beholden to the paprika!

Seriously a perfect recipe. My tomatoes were firm and tart -- almost citrusy in flavor. Matched up with the crisp cornmeal crust with salt and smoky paprika, it was simple and very tasty.

Very yummy with tomatoes cut on the bias. I also added garlic salt after they were done frying.

Here's the story: a storm wrecked one of my tomato plants, so I salvaged what I could and then looked for a recipe for fried green tomatoes, since that's the only use that I know of for green tomatoes. I had never eaten fried green tomatoes before so my rating reflects that, not having any experience to compare this one to. I followed the directions exactly, and they came out better than I expected. Not the greatest food to ever grace my plate, but a good use of my otherwise doomed tomatoes. We enjoyed them dipped in some ranch dressing (it was all I had on hand) and I would use this recipe again if I ever have another mishap with my tomato plants. I would probably not spontaneously add fried green tomatoes to my regular rotation, though.

have never had fried green toms before, but wow. i used the ones from my CSA, and instead of paprika (didn't have any) picked another red spice: cayenne! this is totes yum, and i do believe my BF  who loves them  is now forever my slave. bwah ha ha ha!

Slice the tomatoes 1/4 inch thick, they will fry more crispy and won't be so bitter.

I tried this with cherry tomatoes and they came out pretty well, though I have never had authentic fried green tomatoes. I sliced each tomatoes in half, stirred in the egg, then used a slotted spoon to place small batches on a plate covered in the cornmeal mix, covered them w/ more cornmeal, tossed gently, then fried in a pan with maybe a centimeter of oil in it. Seasoned with quite a bit of salt. Not bad, but I still look forward to trying it with full sized tomatoes.

My mother made fried green tomatoes using flour and butter. I didn't like them then, but these were terrible, tasteless and bitter. A little sugar in the flour might help but if your tomatoes are hard supermarket types, don't bother.

I gave you a 4 forker on this one because i like down home comfort food and i love fried green tomatos. This recipe is great as is or you can seve them up with come cold buttermilk dressing drizzled lightly over the topwith some extra pepper. This was an excellent table goodie.

followed recipe closely, as it was my first time w/ fried green toms. I did add some thyme (fresh), oregano (fresh) and a bit of sage (fresh). They turned out very well, crispy but somewhat tasteless. next time I will add some garlic and fleur de sol, or just more salt lol. Plus, this recipe lends itself to a nice ranch or cucumber dressing for dipping. Maybe a light vinegarette drizzle would add some pizazz?! I will do this again for sure. It's a southern winner!!

This is just about right - the trick for superb fried green toms is to have minimal seasoning and super crisp frying. Finish with a good sprinkle of salt. It really brings out the lemon-y tart deliciousness of a fried green tomato!

I absolutely love fried green tomatoes. Our tomatoes have come (really really) early this year so I have already gotten to try this one out. I've used panko, cornflakes, and breadcrumbs and of all those this with cornmeal and a very fine breadcrumb coating have been the winners. The green tomatoes are dense so they need a dense coating. I also add thyme, granulated garlic, and chili powder.


Origin of fried green tomatoes

Despite being considered a typically Southern dish, little is known about the origins of fried green tomatoes, according to many they were not so common before the 1990s. Author and food historian Robert F. Moss, for example, claims that they first entered the American culinary scene in the Northeastern and Midwestern states, “probably thanks to Jewish immigrants.” What made them famous and known in the South, however, seems to have been “the many schools of home economics developed in the United States in the first half of the 20th century.” They may not have been born in Alabama, but fried green tomatoes that inspired the author of the best-selling book really existed on the menu at Irondale Café, in Jefferson County, where Flagg used to eat them as a child.


  • 3-4 green tomatoes
  • 1 cup plain flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1-2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • vegetable oil
  • salt
  1. Wash and cut green tomatoes into very thin slices.
  2. Dredge with flour, dip in egg and dredge with flour again.
  3. Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat.
  4. Drop dredged tomatoes into hot oil and fry again until lightly browned.
  5. Remove from oil salt immediately.

Recipe Summary

  • 8 medium (about 3 1/2 pounds) green tomatoes
  • 3 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 5 large eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 4 cups panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • 4 cups olive oil
  • Aioli, for serving

Trim 1/2-inch from the stem and blossom ends of tomatoes. Slice tomatoes 1/4-inch thick. Season tomato slices with 2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon pepper set aside.

In a shallow bowl, whisk together eggs and milk set aside. In a second shallow bowl, whisk together flour, 1/2-teaspoon salt, and 1/4-teaspoon pepper set aside.

Place panko in a shallow bowl along with cornmeal, remaining teaspoon salt, and 1/2-teaspoon pepper stir to combine and set aside.

Working with one tomato slice at a time, coat tomatoes with flour mixture, shaking off excess. Coat with egg mixture, followed by breadcrumb mixture. Transfer to a wire rack set over a parchment-lined baking sheet repeat process with remaining slices.

Heat 2 cups oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat until it reaches 350 degrees on a deep-fry thermometer. Working in batches, carefully place tomatoes into the heated oil in a single layer. Fry until golden, turning once, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Drain on a paper towel-lined baking sheet. After frying half of the tomato slices, discard oil and heat remaining 2 cups oil in skillet continue frying remaining tomato slices. Serve tomatoes immediately with aioli.


Classic Fried Green Tomatoes

If you were to make a list of iconic southern dishes, fried green tomatoes would certainly be on it and probably near the top. Southerners have been frying their green tomatoes for ages, but the dish gained national popularity in the late 1980s when Fannie Flagg's novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe was published and later made into a movie.

Green tomatoes are popular in the South, and you can usually find them in southern supermarkets throughout the summer season. If you do not live in the South and do not grow your own tomatoes, check with your local farmer's markets. Besides fried green tomatoes, those end-of-the-season green tomatoes can be used in many other recipes. Some great possibilities include hot dog relish, green tomato pickles even ketchup can be made with green tomatoes. They can also be used to make green tomato pie, moist green tomato cake, or fried corn and green tomato fritters.

This is a basic recipe for classic southern fried green tomatoes, made simply with a lightly seasoned cornmeal coating. They are great served as a side dish or snack, or add them to a special breakfast or brunch menu. Use your trusty iron skillet to fry the tomatoes and serve them with an easy dip or dressing.


Lighten Up Fried Green Tomatoes

Get that familiar golden crunch of fried green tomatoes with heart-healthy oil and a nonstick pan in this lighter recipe of the Southern classic.

Fried Green Tomatoes
Makes: about 20 slices Hands-On Time: 30 min. Total Time: 40 min.

4 medium-size green tomatoes (about 1 1/3 lb.)
½ tsp. salt
½ tsp. pepper
1 cup self-rising white cornmeal mix
½ cup panko (Japanese breadcrumbs)
½ cup all-purpose flour
4 egg whites
3 Tbsp. olive oil

1. Cut tomatoes into ½-inch-thick slices sprinkle with salt and pepper. Let stand 10 minutes.
2. Combine cornmeal mix and panko in a shallow dish or pie plate. Place flour in a second shallow dish or pie plate. Whisk egg whites in a medium bowl until foamy. Dredge tomato slices in flour, shaking off excess. Dip in egg whites, and dredge in cornmeal mixture.
3. Cook half of tomato slices in 1½ Tbsp. hot oil in a nonstick skillet over medium heat 4 to 5 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Season with salt to taste. Place on a wire rack in a jelly-roll pan, and keep warm in a 225° oven. Repeat procedure with remaining tomato slices and oil.
Per Tomato Slice: CALORIES 65 FAT 2.2G (SAT 0.3G, MONO 1.6G, POLY 0.2G) PROTEIN 2.1G CARB 9.3G FIBER 0.6G CHOL 0MG IRON 0.5MG SODIUM 157MG CALC 16MG

Skinny Dips
Each of these low-fat sauces can be stirred together in 10 minutes. Chill 1 hour, and store in an airtight container in the fridge up to 3 days.


Watch the video: Sind grüne. unreife Tomaten giftig . Kompostu0026Liebe (November 2021).