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A Belgian Brewery is Building an Underground Beer Tunnel

A Belgian Brewery is Building an Underground Beer Tunnel

In Bruges, a brewery is helping the environment and reducing traffic with an innovative underground beer tunnel

De Halve Maan Brewery in Bruges, Belgium, one of the country’s oldest breweries in production, is simplifying its production process by digging a two-mile long underground tunnel that will transport beer from the brewery to the bottling facility, reports Modern Farmer.

The beer pipeline is meant to help reduce traffic in the city (the brewery route to the bottler is currently responsible for 85 percent of truck traffic) and ease the environmental strain by removing approximately 500 delivery trucks.

The 1.86-mile tunnel will transport approximately 6,000 liters of beer per hour, and the cost of construction will be provided entirely by the brewery.

According to De Halve Maan Brewery, the pipeline will be similar to modern pipelines for oil and gas and will not damage the city’s architecture.

City Lab also points out that this is not the only beer tunnel in use: Cleveland, Ohio’s Great Lakes Brewing Company also uses underground tubing to transport beer from the brewery to the pub across the street.

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Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


Bruges just built a two-mile-long underground pipeline for beer

The Belgian city of Bruges is renowned for its historic architecture and cobbled streets – however the narrow winding roads also make traffic a nightmare. That was a major problem for De Halve Maan brewery, which moves a million gallons of beer each year to their bottling plant outside of town. Now, an underground pipeline will help ease traffic congestion by pumping the beer directly to the facility. The series of bundled pipes can transport up to 1,060 gallons of beer per hour.

The owner of the De Halve Maan, Xavier Vanneste, had the idea when he saw construction workers installing cable networks in the city’s center. However, building the pipeline was no easy feat. It took three years to obtain the permits, raise funds, and finally construct the line. Due to the historical significance of many sites in the city, the route needed to be thoroughly researched before any pipe was laid. All in all, it costs $4.5 million to build, with about $335,000 crowdfunded from online beer lovers.

Related: Beer made from harvested fog wets whistles of parched communities in Chile

In order to preserve the beer’s taste and satisfy food safety requirements, the pipeline uses high-density polyethylene, a tough, food-grade plastic. Between batches, the pipes will be sterilized with jets of cleaning solution. The pipe began pumping beer beneath the streets of Bruges this summer.


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