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10 Crazy Ice Cream Flavors Around the World (Slideshow)

10 Crazy Ice Cream Flavors Around the World (Slideshow)

Lox, white truffle and caviar, this list reads like a recipe for an international potluck rather than an ice cream list

Nova Lox (Max and Mina’s, United States)

You can eat dessert for brunch at this small shop in Queens that counts Al Roker and Rosie O’Donnell among its fans. The nova lox starts like most other flavors with a vanilla base, but it’s the unconventional mix-ins — nova lox, cream cheese, and salt—that make it extraordinary.

Caviar (Philippe Faur, France)

With dishes like the popular sea bream with caviar ice cream made from 60 percent white sturgeon Alverta Royal Petrossian caviar, ice cream transcends the dessert menu at Philippe Faur’s restaurant. Faur offers the sorbet in his ice cream shops, but you don’t have to travel to France for this luxury — he ships orders overseas in special packaging that keeps cold for up to 72 hours.

White Truffle Gelato (Bella Gelateria, Canada)

Truffle and caviar sound like overkill, but Bella Gelateria owner James Coleridge knows his ice cream. Coleridge, who took home both the technical and the people’s choice award at the 2012 Florence Gelato Festival, infuses his gelato base with white truffle and black caviar for an insanely rich experience.

Frankincense (Oman)

Though American essential oils producer Trygve Harris was initially drawn to this Middle Eastern tree for its aroma, he soon found it to be a popular ingredient for ice cream as well. Frankincense is used for meditation, and the treat offers the same cooling effect with spicy orange notes. Harris serves it each summer at a stand at Oman’s biggest frankincense market.

Mustard (Waitrose Supermarkets, U.K.)

Often overshadowed by ketchup, mustard finally has its own spotlight in Michelin-starred chef Heston Blumenthal’s ice cream line found at the Waitrose supermarket chain. The flavor features Pommery grain mustard and sugar for a sweet/salty combination.

Spaghetti and Cheese (Heladeria Coromoto, Venezuela)

Spaghetti and cheese — yes, with real spaghetti and cheese — is only one of more than 1,000 flavors offered at Heladeria Coromoto. The Venezuelan shop holds the Guinness Book of Records standard for the largest selection of ice cream flavors in the world. There are 60 flavors on rotation each day, including tuna, hot dog, and Diet Coke.

Salad (Japan)

Dieters in Japan have a best friend in salad ice cream. The strawberry base with lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, and peppers makes indulgences feel a little more virtuous, and it’s widely available in supermarkets. Those in search of something even crazier can search the freezer for horsemeat, squid, and curry flavors.

Hummus (Legenda Ice Cream, Israel)

Israel’s ubiquitous spread doesn’t need pita any longer at Legenda Ice Cream in Jaffa. The shop’s hummus ice cream contains ground chickpeas, tahini, vanilla, and sugar. The result is a sweet take on hummus that tastes similar to halva, a dessert of tahini and honey.

Breast Milk (The Icecreamists, U.K.)

Ice cream makers have experimented with goat’s milk before, but London shop The Icecreamists (since closed) drew headlines in 2011 when it experimented with human milk. “Baby Gaga” contained breast milk from paid donors flavored with vanilla and lemon zest. Though shop said it screened and pasteurized the milk, the London city government confiscated the product for a period after its launch over public concerns of safety. Served in a martini glass, the controversial scoop cost an equivalent of $22.50.

Bacalao (Heladeria Lares, Puerto Rico)

Yelp/Paul M

Bacalao, or salt cod, is the key ingredient in the staple Puerto Rican fish stew. At Heladeria Lares in the small town of Lares, it’s also a popular ice cream flavor. Pair it with arroz con habichuelas (rice with stewed beans) for an icy, savory meal.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.


Delicious Creepy Crawly Snacks Around the World

The United Nations wants us to just get over it. our inner cringe-response to eating insects, that is. Our six-legged neighbors have been getting the short end of the stick from squeamish humans, particularly as a food source which could solve the problems of growing poverty, pollution, and the lack of agricultural resources to feed a growing population of seven billion (which by 2050 will be around nine billion).

Entomologist (bug specialist) and champion for insectivores everywhere Marcel Dicke explained in a TED talk that Americans are already eating a lot more insects than they realize: at least 500 grams of the creepy crawlies are crushed into their processed food every year. No, it's not a conspiracy -- during the preparation and packaging of many processed foods, bugs do make their way into the mix quite by accident, and so the USDA allows for a certain ratio in all food from peanut butter (50 insect fragments allowed per 100 grams) to ketchup (30 fruit fly eggs per 100 grams). It's allowed because, really, eating insects is not bad for your health. it's actually really, really good for you.

Bugs are a comparable protein source to pork, beef, and chicken they're also an excellent source of other nutrition, serving up everything from minerals to vitamins to fatty acids and fiber. Most insects, such as mealworms, also contain a comparable amount of omega-3 fatty acids to that in fish. Also, Mopani caterpillars have an iron content that ranges from 31-77 milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight versus only six milligrams per 100 grams of dry weight in beef. Insects also produce a lot less waste and are far more environmentally friendly than meat production.

The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization even tells us there are more than 1,900 edible insect species on the planet, so with dwindling crop and meat food resources, it makes sense to just eat more insects. Many countries around the world are already doing just that in fact, 36 African countries are "entomophagous" (meaning they eat insects), as are 23 in the Americas, 29 in Asia, and even 11 in Europe. Raw termites are a popular tasty treat in Uganda, crispy fried locusts are a common snack food in Thailand, in Mexico ant larvae make a nutty delicious bite, and in South Africa many people enjoy eating grilled Mopane worms.

It's not a purely foreign concept, either insects have actually been crawling onto U.S. menus for years. In California a local confectioner is serving up a range of candy covered insects, from chocolate-dipped scorpions to insect candy suckers -- all made with real insects, of course. And in New York a local Mexican restaurant offers a range of insect dishes, including tacos piled high with crispy dried grasshoppers.

Insects really are the six-legged meat of the future, and once you get over your initial aversion, making a meal of them just makes good sense, and can be quite tasty too. Here are some of the most delicious creepy crawly snacks and dishes from around the world.