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These ‘Healthy’ Vegetable-Spiked Brownies Are Actually Delicious (And These Aren’t)

These ‘Healthy’ Vegetable-Spiked Brownies Are Actually Delicious (And These Aren’t)

In a bid to enable ourselves to eat more brownies, and to not feel too guilty about doing so, we’ve been following the trend of vegetable-spiked brownies rather intensely. Initially it seemed hard to believe that a brownie which contained a single ingredient that could be deemed healthy would ever taste any good, but after a bit of experimenting, and a lot of tasting, we’ve realized that there are some vegetables which slot into those brownies in the most subtle way. Although they may not be as perfect as the butter-filled classic, they really can be delicious. So if you want to treat yourself to a daily brownie, and not feel guilty about it, here are the vegetables to add, and also the ones you should definitely avoid:

Vegetables to Add:

Avocado

The vegan bakers amongst you will be well aware of the benefits to be gained from making brownies with avocado. It makes a great replacement for eggs and milk, and results in a brownie with a wonderfully fudgy texture, without impacting the chocolate flavor.

Beets

Adding puréed beets to your brownies means you can cut back on the quantity of sugar you use, thanks to the natural sweetness of this pretty vegetable.

For the Fudgy Beet Brownie recipe, click here.

Pumpkin

Adding pumpkin to desserts obviously isn’t unusual, so you may not be surprised to learn that you can also add pumpkin purée to your brownies for a healthier and wonderfully autumnal take on your favorite chocolate treat.

For the Pumpkin Brownies recipe, click here.

Sweet Potato

Since sweet potatoes are so naturally, well, sweet, they are a great healthy addition to every homemade cake. Adding them to your brownies will make you feel better about what you’re eating, and will mean you don’t miss out on that rich, satisfying flavor.

Zucchini

Sneak some extra vegetables into your day by making a batch of these zucchini brownies. The zucchini makes these brownies wonderfully moist and light, and you won’t even be able to taste the zucchini once they’re baked.

For the Zucchini Brownies recipe, click here.

Vegetables to Avoid:

Broccoli

There are several zucchini brownie recipes which state that you could swap this vegetable for a much more pungent alternative: Broccoli. We don’t recommend that you ever try this, as you can both see and taste the broccoli.

Cauliflower

Cauliflower is hugely popular as a low-carb alternative for so many things such as rice, pizza crust, and mashed potatoes. But it doesn’t work as an alternative to flour in brownies. Many people have recommended it, and while it does lead to a low-carb brownie, it also leads to a brownie that you don’t want to eat.

Leafy Greens

The health-conscious cooks out there have been adding all sorts of greens, such as kale and spinach, to their brownies. However, we’d rather skip eating a brownie altogether than have to try and swallow one of these leaf-filled brownies: Getting the flavor combination of chocolate and kale out of your mouth is more challenging than we had hoped.


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella


Chocolate Brownies (with Carrot and Spinach) from Deceptively Delicious

Now I know that there is a huge debate raging here about copyright and Jessica Seinfeld's Deceptively Delicious book and Missy Lapine's Sneaky Chef book and whilst its interesting, I'm more interested in the recipes than the controversy. Not that I'm not interested in Hollywood or literary gossip mind you, I am of course being an avid "trash mag" connoisseur, but my stomach beckons a little more.

After seeing Jessica on Oprah, I was intrigued by the recipes. I've noticed that whenever Oprah does a food show, she tries the food but doesn't really go for it preferring to sample little bits rather than indulge. In this case, perhaps because the recipes are low fat and healthy, she was literally wolfing the food down throughout the whole show accompanying her degustation with amorous groans of pleasure. Her audience's reaction too was similar in nature with a lot of head nodding so I knew I had to try these things for myself.

The odd thing about brownies is that they have a lot of eggs, butter and chocolate to help keep them moist. In this recipe, there's hardly any, just 2 large egg whites and 2 tablespoons of butter so my skepticism was high. It became even higher when pureeing the spinach. I love spinach and cheese but plain spinach is not appealing at all. Plain spinach in a brownie is even less so. I remained skeptical until I tasted the final raw batter before it was about to be put into the oven. It was rather chocolately and no matter how hard I tried, had no spinach taste at all.

After baking, I found that they didn't rise a great deal at all and whilst my baking pan was almost exactly 8inches (20cms) by 8inches (20cms) as specified, the brownies were a little flat. That was a bit disappointing. And if you're expecting a typical luscious brownie with crispy top and moist chewy centre, you may be disappointed. I found that, as she said, with my first bite of a warm one, there was the slightest hint of "something" although it thankfully didn't scream "spinach!!" to me. After letting it cool as suggested I started on a new brownie. Phew, no spinach taste. By the third or fourth bite, when I realised I was eating an extremely healthy version of a brownie but it was rich and chocolately I find they aren't so bad after all. In fact, they were rather good. And by the end of my first cool brownie, I'm reaching for another.

DID YOU MAKE THIS RECIPE? Share your creations by tagging @notquitenigella on Instagram with the hashtag #notquitenigella