Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

What’s Happening in Washington, DC: October 19, 2015

What’s Happening in Washington, DC: October 19, 2015

Living in the DMV can sometimes be like standing at the center of a political maelstrom with a constant calendar of public protests, a 24/7 news cycle, sparring political factions, and dozens of political media hacks vying for center stage. Combine that with a steady stream of new restaurant openings, revolving menus, and special food and drink events, and you have a unique food scene that is part opera buffa and gourmet spectacle. This week, the stage is populated with fundraisers created to fight for marriage equality that also celebrate the art of wedding cakes, fine wine dinners featuring Aussie beauties, bourbon tastings, and pasta classes.

Chefs for Equality Gala Returns and is Hosted at Ritz-Carlton Washington
Human Rights Campaignis hosting its fourth annual Chefs for Equality event this Tuesday, October 20 from 6:00 to 9:30 p.m. at the Ritz-Carlton D.C. To help celebrate LGBT equal rights, more than 100 celebrated DMV chefs, pastry chefs and mixologists are joining forces to support this year’s cause: fighting the RFRA [Religious Freedom Restoration Act], which bypasses the favorable Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage. The gala’s motif pays homage to the center piece of every wedding reception—the wedding cake, and along with delicious cake, the evening will include tasty food and drink, music and an auction. And the pièce de résistance is 17 masterfully decorated, multi-tiered wedding cakes prepared by talent local pastry chefs. Tickets for Chefs for Equality are $200 per person and can be purchased at the Chefs for Equality website. Proceeds benefit the Human Rights Campaign’s efforts to protect same-sex marriage throughout the country.

Masseria to Host Three-Course Tasting Menu Paired with Belle Meade Bourbon
Bourbon is still all the rage across the land and Masseria, the new NoMa restaurant from Nicholas Stefanelli, has become one of the latest hot spots to see and be seen. Wednesday, October 21, they will be hosting fifth generation distiller Charlie Nelson, founder of the historic Nelson's Green Brier Distillery in Nashville, Tennessee, to honor his acclaimed artisanal Belle Meade Bourbon. Masseria will offer their standard three-course prix-fixe dinner for $62 per person with the option of pairing (for an additional $32 per person) the meal with Belle Meade Bourbon (BMB) cocktails made with BMB 6 year, BMB 9 Belle Meade, and BMB Sherry Cask Finish. If you still need a bourbon fix after dinner, we suggest you consider the tasting flight of the three bourbons for $20.

Oval Room to Host Hentley Farm Wine Tasting
The Oval Room is known for its impeccable service and food and spectacular rare wine dinners. Saturday, October 17, they will be hosting a special wine dinner featuring Australia’s “2015 Winery of the Year,” Hentley Farm Wines. Executive chef John Melfi’s stellar five-course menu will be complemented by pairings of Hentley Farm’s Rosé 2014, Riesling 2014, Stray Mongrel 2011, Clos Otto Shiraz 2011, and “The Beast” Shiraz 2011. Wine lovers will have a chance to chat with the winery’s founder, Keith Hentschke and can join the dinner for $85 per person (tax and gratuity not included). The evening’s event begins at 7:00 p.m. and you may make reservations by calling the Oval Room at (202) 463-8700.

Urbana to Host Lombardian Pasta Class
Not everyone is a natural born cooking savant and if you want to get your pasta cucina game on, consider taking a Lombardian fall harvest pasta class at Urbana, Saturday, October 24 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. Urbana chef Ethan McKee is inspired by fall flavors like pumpkin and sage and in this class you will take turns making pastas like pumpkin tortelli with sage butter, gemelli with Tallegio cream and pancetta, and buckwheat pizzoccheri with Swiss chard and garlic crumbs. The price is $45 per person and reservations can be made by calling (202) 956-6650.

Related

Summer Whitford is the D.C. Editor and food, drink and travel writer at The Daily Meal. You can follow her on Twitter @FoodandWineDiva and on Instagram at thefoodandwinediva.


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Indian Summer: What, Why, and When?

In the fall, it seems that almost any warm day is referred to by most people as an “Indian summer.” And while their error is certainly not of the world-shaking variety, they are, for the most part, mistaken. Find out what a real Indian summer is!

What Is an Indian Summer?

Here are the criteria for a true Indian summer:

  • As well as being warm, the atmosphere during Indian summer is hazy or smoky, there is no wind, the barometer is standing high, and the nights are clear and chilly.
  • A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
  • The time of occurrence is important: The warm days must follow a spell of cold weather or a good hard frost, but also be before first snowfall.
  • The conditions described above also must occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. For over 200 years, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has adhered to the saying, “If All Saints’ (November 1) brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.”

We rather enjoy this description written by Sandy Griswold for the Omaha Sunday World-Herald in November 1922:

I am enabled to say, however, that the characteristics of the season, when it appears in all its glory, are a mild and genial temperature, gentle southwestern breezes, unusual brightness of the sun, extreme brilliancy of the moon, a clear, blue sky sometimes half hidden by a veil of gray haze daybreaks redder than the splotch on the blackbird’s wing, and sunsets laden with golden fleeces, the wooded valleys aglow with the fires of richly tinted leaves, still clinging to the listless limbs, or lying where they have fallen….

Why Is it Called an “Indian Summer”?

In parts of Europe, a similar phenomenon is known as an “Old Wives’ Summer” or “St. Martin’s Summer,” but how did the term “Indian summer” come to be? There are many theories.

Some say the term comes from Algonquian Native Americans located in what is now the northeastern United States, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit (“great spirit”).

Similarly, another origin states that Native Americans would routinely use this brief period of warm fall weather to gather a final round of supplies before winter’s hold set in.

Yet another possible origin involves European settlers in New England. Each year they would welcome the arrival of a cold wintry weather in late October when they could leave their stockades unarmed. But then came a time when it would suddenly turn warm again, and the Native Americans would decide to have one more go at the settlers. “Indian summer,” the settlers called it.

Watch a video from Almanac Editor-in-Chief Judson Hale about the origin of Indian Summer.

Indian Summer Recipes

Try our delicious Indian Summer Applesauce or Indian Pudding on your next Indian summer day.

Are you experiencing Indian summer conditions in your area? Let us know in the comments below!


Watch the video: 7 Facts about Washington DC (December 2021).