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Someone Is Selling a Rotting Twinkie on eBay

Someone Is Selling a Rotting Twinkie on eBay

Twinkies have long been rumored to possess the supernatural ability to survive anything, including bankruptcies, nuclear events, and even the long, slow march of time itself. But it turns out Twinkies are mortal after all; one man has proof and has decided to do what any intrepid Internet entrepreneur would do with that kind of significant scientific discovery: sell it on eBay.

The latest entry in the chronicle of weird food novelties being sold on eBay is a streaky green Twinkie, unpackaged and wrapped in plastic. The seller says he's had the Twinkie for a year, and that it was already green when he found and almost ate it.

"I survived, but I wrapped the green Twinkie in clingwrap, and then decided I'd write Hostess," the seller says. "Obviously, they wanted it but I said no."

Over the years, people have spread all sorts of crazy rumors about the lifespan of the Twinkie. According to Snopes, its readers have relayed claims that Twinkies have shelf lives in the decades, contain chemicals used in embalming fluid, and would outlast even their cellophane wrappers.

“According to lore, Twinkies have multi-year shelf lives and remain edible for decades,” writes Barbara Mikkelson of Snopes. The rumored immortality is usually credited to the idea that the Twinkie is not actually made of food, but of chemicals strung together through artificial processes and molded to look like a fluffy cake.

The legends of the Twinkie’s long shelf life have even inspired awesome time-lapse videos of Twinkies failing to decay while sitting next to fresh produce that quickly turns to mush. But just because a Twinkie outlasts a fresh tomato does not make it eternal. The Twinkie actually has a shelf life of 25 days, which is a long time for a baked good but a poor substitute for immortality.

The horrifyingly moldy Twinkie's responsible seller urges any prospective buyers to remember that while the item may have started out as a delicious golden pastry, it is long past the point of being something that should be eaten.

"It is not food now," he writes. "Do not eat. Do not eat. Do not eat." He insists that the Twinkie is being sold only as a scientific and historical curiosity.

Gawker's Mallory Ortberg suggests that there is no great mystery to the Twinkie. "Like all things," she writes, "it will decay and disintegrate into nothing. You can also perform this experiment at home by selecting any dessert of your choice and exposing it to time and the elements; you can do this for free."

Bidding on the auction started at $25. So far 10 bids have driven the price up to $46, but there are two days left on the auction, so this gross, rotting Twinkie is anybody’s game.


Rotting E-Type Jaguar fetches [pounds sterling]20,000 on eBay The sought-after 1968 E-Type was in terrible condition after spending several decades sitting in a field in Pennsylvania.

A rotting E-Type Jaguar has been sold for almost [pounds sterling]20,000 on eBay as demand for the iconic vehicles reaches ever more dizzy heights.

The aged roadster, a sought-after 1968 E-Type Series 1.5, was in terrible condition after spending several decades sitting in a field in the US state of Pennsylvania.

The shell was heavily rusted and many of the car's mechanical components had been removed and stored elsewhere.

The eBay seller described the car as 'non-running' and requiring 'total restoration' but believed almost all of the car's parts were still with it.

On their eBay auction post, the seller, 'cdpbackup', said: "I'm assisting my father with selling this car. It was purchased from a friend who unfortunately let the car sit out in a field for far too long.

"My father actually remembers seeing the car around town in the 70s and knows the previous owner.

"I'd love to attempt to save it, but know that I don't posses a fraction of the skills, money, or time required for this level of project."

Bidding on the Midland-made car started at $5,000 and in all 34 bids were received before it hit its $31,100 sale price.

But the acquisition was seen as a high risk by one acclaimed motoring author and classic car expert.

Martyn Nutland said: "The E-Type Jaguar is one of the all-time motoring icons and this was once one of the early, very sexy roadsters.

"Good ones are of course extremely desirable and sought after. And you do have to remember that when the E-Type came out it was a fairly cheap car for what it was, poorly made, not very durable and, as a consequence, most of the unrestored ones -- and some of the restored examples -- around today are 'dogs'.

"The problem with this one is that it's not a low mileage, highly original, but neglected, barn find. Rather, it's a car with no known history nor provenance, that has been horrendously abused to the point of near-destruction by some clown who left it in a field -- probably the worst place on Earth to abandon a car.

"Sorting this mess out is going to cost thousands upon thousands of pounds paid to someone who really knows what they are doing." Mr Nutland added: "It's much more desirable than the later 2+2 coupes which fetch somewhere in the [pounds sterling]35,000-[pounds sterling]50,000 bracket for a good example. A pristine early roadster like this might fetch, [pounds sterling]80-90,000. There are a lot of people around the classic car world who have far more money than sense, especially in America."


No more Twinkies? Hostess closes, blaming strikers

As Hostess Brands on Friday filed for bankruptcy after failing to win concessions from its striking bakery workers, abruptly cutting loose more than 18,000 employees in the Bay Area and beyond, consumers went into collective mourning over the apparent demise of one of the sweetest, fluffiest, most beguiling culinary icons America has ever known.

The shock to the nation’s system was almost palpable. Somehow, a spongecake renowned for being nearly indestructible had been destroyed, an innocent if hydrogenated bystander in a brutal battle between unions and the hedge funds that control the Irving, Texas-based company. In one bite, Hostess was gone, along with the soft, emotional filling of many an American childhood. Suddenly, Twinkies had become a metaphor for a quickly fading past.

“The Twinkie was a popular cult icon, a reference point that was mentioned by Homer Simpson and even spawned Twinkie cookbooks,” said Nancy Down, head librarian at the Browne Popular Culture Library at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. “It’s pure nostalgia and it reminds us of a happy childhood. And even though I don’t think I’d eat one today, it has that sweetness and shape, that perfect sort of handheld thing, that made it such a comfort food for so many people.”

Of course, there’s always a chance the Twinkie brand will be sold to another company in the bankruptcy, but Friday, many of the snack’s fans went into a sort of nostalgic frenzy. The Twittersphere quickly filled with sugar-high laments, including Funny or Die, which wrote: “In 20 years, rich potheads will pay top dollar for unopened Twinkies.”

Twinkie recipes flooded the Internet. And Hostess products flew off the shelves at outlets like the one in San Leandro, where one woman filled her back seat with boxes of Twinkies so her kids, until now prohibited from eating the processed snack, could have their fill before the cakes went away forever.

Hollister’s Linda Lampe, visiting her son in Oakland, stopped to stock up on the Twinkie’s soul sister, the MoonPie, because “they’re as traditional as grits in the South where I come from,” she said. “There’s even a song that says, ‘Give me an RC Cola and a MoonPie.’ Just to think, this is the end of a tradition.”

That tradition started in 1930 when James A. Dewar, a manager for Continental Baking, decided to inject the squishy spongecake with banana filling vanilla would later be used. The Twinkie name was inspired by a billboard for the Twinkle Toe Shoe Co.

It appeared to end Friday morning as trucks made what could be their final deliveries of Twinkies and Hostess Cupcakes, Ho Hos and Wonder Bread. Hostess blamed the unions for killing the company and immediately shut down its 565 distribution centers and 570 bakery outlet stores, as well as 33 bakeries, including one in Oakland that employed 145 people.

There was, of course, a darker side to the story than simply the loss of a 150-calorie sugar-dispensing vehicle once dubbed the “cream puff of the proletariat.” Thousands of real jobs had vanished, including the truck-driving gig that Fremont resident Andy Kurzadkowski first took 30 years ago with Colombo bread before it became part of Hostess.

“Today’s my last day,” he said Friday afternoon, still in shock after being called in from vacation to pick up his termination packet. “I was hoping they’d work it out with the bakers. I have a wife and 15-year-old daughter, and this was our sole income. Even if someone else buys parts of the company, I don’t know how that will help us, because we’d all have to start over again from scratch.”

Staff photographer Laura Oda contributed to this report. Contact Patrick May at 408-920-5689.

A few fun facts about the Twinkie

Twinkies were scorned by nutritionists as the archetypal unhealthy snack and became a comic’s punch line, but lots of people ate them. Hostess manufactured 1,000 Twinkies a minute at its bakeries, and the Washington Post reported in 2005 that Americans had bought $47 million worth of Twinkies in the previous year.


Book Donation Tips

The written word is precious. Don’t let it end up in landfills! Of course, not all books are worthy of a second home. Sometimes, your old school textbooks just have no further value.

How do you know whether you should look for book recycling bins or sell it on eBay? Here are a few book donation tips that might help. Throwing them away s is NOT a good way to deal with them! If you want more sustainable decluttering tips, check out my post on recycling resources

  • Don’t donate books that are water damaged, smell like smoke, or are otherwise damaged. No one wants them, trust me.
  • Most book donation programs accept only BOOKS. Not photo albums, used sticker books, or old newspapers. In addition, don’t donate old library books. That’s just not cool. Give them back to the library if at all possible.
  • Ask yourself if it’s out of date. For example, old encyclopedias (more than 5 years old) do no one any good.
  • Have questions? Call and ask. Contact your local book donation center and ask about their acceptance guidelines. Don’t waste their time donating things that they don’t need or want.


The History of America’s Favorite Sponge Cake, the Twinkie

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It was 1999 when President Clinton placed a Twinkie into the American time capsule. The time capsule, designed in the shape of a waving American flag, would be opened again in 2100.

Twinkies made the national this-is-why-America-is-so-wonderful list. Who thought Twinkies were better than Hostess cupcakes?

Yet, from the first time the vanilla-cream centered Twinkies were unveiled during WWII, we have been a nation obsessed (they were originally introduced with banana cream filling in 1930, but a banana shortage forced the Twinkie team to get creative). In 2006, Ten Speed Press made us feel like we were back in a fifties kitchen when they published a recipe book filled with Twinkie-centric recipes, ranging from the strange (Pigs in a Twinkie—sounds adorable, but hell if I’m trying that) to the possibly delicious (Twinkie dessert lasagna).

Photo courtesy of Prince.org

Pig in a Twinkie, anyone? (I double-dog dare someone to eat this.)

Twinkies are so ingrained in the American food scene that when bankruptcy threatened to bring the Twinkie into extinction in 2012 (remember the panic?), boxes of the yellow sponge cakes were selling on eBay for upwards of $100 (they’re a steal now, selling for $13.29). One year later, the investment firm Metropoulos & Co. along with Apollo Global Management, dished out $410 million to save the nostalgic snacks.

1934 to 2014: Things have changed about America’s favorite snack cake. When James Dewar, mastermind behind the Twinkie, first put it on the shelves, it was made with real butter, eggs and milk. Whole ingredients! Real deliciousness! Alas, the trend couldn’t survive—boxes would only last two days on the shelves. The Twinkies of today can’t, despite urban legends, survive a nuclear attack. Or 101 years in a time capsule. Even with this cellophane wrapping, they lose their freshness after 25 days.

And then, in 2010, there came the Twinkie Diet. Mark Haub, a nutrition professor at Kansas State, subsisted on Twinkies every three hours (along with Doritos and Little Debbie Snacks, for variety) for ten weeks…and dropped 27 lbs in the process. The Twinkie Diet. Otherwise known as Severe Calorie Restriction Likely to Make You Shun All Sweets Things After This Diet.

According to some Twinkie aficionados, the post-bankruptcy Twinkies are not so nostalgic. The sponge cake is no longer spongy, they report. And the cream no longer heavenly and sweet. I’ll stick to my Hostess cupcakes.

If you’re feeling iffy about the boxed version, or want to make your own version of Pigs in a Twinkie, you can find killer recipes here. Let’s see what bakers will come up with next.


Forks/Palmer Stores Selling Out of Twinkies

The same day Hostess Brand Inc. announced it will close, someone came in and bought all the Twinkies from the Village West Giant Food Store in South Whitehall.

That scene is repeating itself at Giant Food Stores and Weis Markets in Palmer and Forks townships as people buy up all the sweet treats.

Hostess Brand Inc. announced Friday it filed a motion in U.S. Bankruptcy Court asking permission to close and sell assets - including its iconic brands and facilities.

Giant Store Manager Jeff Pierpoint said people came in after the announcement and "bought all the Twinkies." As of noon Nov. 17 there were still some other varieties available.

Everything, however, was gone from the Weis Markets on Route 873 in North Whitehall, according to customer service manager Claudia Hanblovic.

"Everything except the [Wonder] bread is gone," Hanblovic said.

Hostess lovers are hoping someone will buy the company and continue producing the products but no one has come forth publicly - yet. Competitors, like Tastykake, aren't talking. Tastykake was bought by Georgia-based Flowers Foods in 2011.

In a recent article in the Philadelphia Inquirier, a Flowers spokesman said in a statement, "It is not our place to talk about any other company's business. However, this is an unfortunate situation and we are very sad for all those impacted."

The Huffington Post reports: One eBay seller is auctioning off a full box of Twinkies at a starting (and staggering) price of $200,000 (shipping included) and there is also a bizarre brand of petition that has been filed with the White House seeking to turn President Obama into the Hugo Chavez of Twinkies. The petition, titled "Nationalize the Twinkie industry," seeks to turn back the clock on Hostess Brands going out of business and liquidation.

CNN Money reported: A lunch box featuring "Twinkie the Kid," a cartoon cowboy character that bears a striking resemblance to the iconic yellow cake, fetched a winning bid of $690 on Friday, after Hostess said it was seeking permission from a federal bankruptcy court to close down all its bakeries.

A Friday press release from Hostess reads: The wind down means the closure of 33 bakeries, 565 distribution centers, approximately 5,500 delivery routes and 570 bakery outlet stores throughout the United States.

"We deeply regret the necessity of today's decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike," said Gregory F. Rayburn, chief executive officer. "Hostess Brands will move promptly to lay off most of its 18,500-member work force and focus on selling its assets to the highest bidders."

In a letter to employees, Hostess writes: "As you know, for many months the Company has been working with our unions, lenders and other stakeholders to reach a consensual resolution to legacy costs and labor contracts. Despite everyone's considerable efforts to move Hostess out of its restructuring, when we began implementing the Company's last, best and final offer, the Bakers Union chose to stage a crippling strike. This affected Hostess' ability to continue to make products and service its customers' needs and pushed Hostess into a Wind Down scenario.

"As a result, we are forced to proceed with an orderly wind down and sale of our operations and assets. We deeply regret taking this action. But we simply cannot continue to operate without the ability to produce or deliver our products."


G-Shocks, Resin Rot, and Avoiding an Obsession

Browsing a garage sale, I examined a plastic bag full of watches. It was mostly junky stuff, including a lightweight piece that said “Rolex” on it, but there was also one Casio G-Shock.

Before it all fell apart. Casio G-Shock DW6800. Source: TCM

Not that I needed another watch, but I had been casually looking at new Casio G-Shocks, which have a reputation for toughness at affordable prices. This one, however, had been sitting in the sun all morning and when I picked it up, the plasticky looking watch felt like it was melting. I ended up paying a dollar for it, the price helped by the fact that the bezel surrounding the watch face cracked in my hand while talking with the seller.

At home, any thought of glueing the broken piece together fell apart as quickly as the bezel itself, which continued to disintegrate in my hand. The watch face and the band, however, were fine, and after I put in a new battery the watch ran perfectly. Cleaned up, the now bezel-less G-Shock actually looked pretty good.

Slimy bezel fragments. Source: TCM

The model number on the back of the watch case was DW-6800.After a relatively quick internet search, I learned that this model was only produced in 1995. So it’s a rare watch from a collectible brand that runs perfectly. Maybe I should clean it up some more, find a replacement bezel, wear it proudly, and maybe even sell it later for a little profit.

Casio G-Shock DW6800, debezeled. Source: TCM

Except rare doesn’t always mean valuable. More searching through watch and G-Shock forums showed that while the DW-6800 model is uncommon, it’s not exactly popular. The few posts I found usually had collectors admitting they didn’t know much about that model.

Keanu wearing the more popular DW-5600 in Speed, which came out in 1994, the year before my watch was released. Source: Speed/www.g-central.com

I also learned the disintegrating bezel was not unique to my watch. The condition is common enough on older Casios that it has a name: resin rot. Since this watch was made almost 25 years ago, Casio does not make any replacement bezels for it. There aren’t very many used ones out there that could be cannibalized for parts, and even if there were, those bezels would be just as old, and at risk of rotting soon anyway.

There were hints of a solution – knockoff parts on eBay or Amazon, replacement bezels that could be purchased from shops in Southeast Asia (many with crystals or other bling on them), even a slightly mysterious source in Brazil who could only be contacted through Facebook. But all those were for different G-Shock models. The DW-6800 seemed to be unloved by the collectors and fashionistas.

Iced-out custom G-Shock 6900. Source: thedrop.com.

Here I was at a crossroads. I could continue the search, obsessively looking for a NOS (new old stock) bezel on Ebay, contacting sellers on Etsy, or buying a bezel for a different model and seeing if I could make it fit. Maybe I could even find someone to 3D-print a one-off bezel. But wait a minute. I had bought the watch on a whim. I had spent a few hours cleaning it and doing internet research. With the new battery, I was still only in for less than $10. Did I really want to spend a lot more time, and potentially a lot more money, trying to restore this thing?

I enjoyed researching the Casio watches. I learned a bit about G-Shocks and the people who collect them. It was satisfying to clean up the watch and get it running (simply by replacing the battery). But I did not need to pursue this any further. I have other interests I would prefer to obsess about.

I may buy another (new) G-Shock watch some day. I may put this one on eBay, so someone who has a broken DW-6800 with a perfect bezel can buy it. Or I might just wear it as is. It’s functional and has a bit of a deconstructed look to it. Naked G-Shocks – is that a thing?


Started selling my crafts online to make money because I lost my job during the pandemic. Someone is reporting me

I sell hair accessories and face masks. Apparently one of my designs is similar to someone else’s. Got a message today saying that someone is reporting my business for stealing artistic integrity and that they hope I have all my business licenses to protect me. I barely make $10 a day (if that) so do I need a license? What would happen if this person reported me? I literally had no idea one of my hair accessories was similar to someone’s. I am from California.

You got a message from a stranger online.. just ignore it unless an actual legal matter comes up.

Who are they reporting it to?

How similar to their design is it?

Do you have your designs or drafts or however you came up with your art?

Is their work copyrighted?

What platform are you using to sell your art?

Have you obtained any actual legal notices?

In addition, did the stranger copy her style copyright it and claim they had it first?

I think you mean to ask if their work has been registered with the copyright office. Because once something's created and shared it's copyrighted, correct?

Iɽ actually say that a face mask pattern, unless it has some really unique features is likely not copyrighted as it would be difficult to create a face mask that's unique enough to copyright.

They have the copyright as long as they created the design. That copyright is automatic and is owned by the creator unless the copyright is transferred through sale or by being commissioned - but all that would be in the contract.

The Arts and Craft Police are a real thing.

OP they’re just trying to scare you. As long as you aren’t stealing someone else’s work (similarly looking things don’t count) and you aren’t violating the sites rules there’s not an issue.

NAL. "Stealing artistic integrity" isn't really a thing. It's very difficult to get copyright protection for functional items and clothing designs, "useful articles." Don't worry about an infringement claim at this point, patent and trademark infringement are even more unlikely.

Not sure what business licensing concerns would be present. If you're using a site like eBay or Etsy, I don't think there's any kind of license requirement, but check their terms of service and complaint procedures to see if the complainant has a claim that could get you kicked off the retailer of choice. I doubt it but it's worth looking into.

Also: Even if the material of the complaintant was copyrightable (you don't need to file for copyright protection anymore), independent creation is a complete defense. If you have any proof that you designed it yourself you should be fine in the unlikely event that a copyright infringement claim is brought.

Don't lose sleep over this.

In some places, even selling stuff online requires business licensing (it does here in my city). Op needs to check state and municipal and county licensing requirements.

NAL, but I sell on Etsy and this happens a lot. The worst thing that could happen at this point is they file a DMCA takedown request for copyright infringement. Now to have one issued, you have to be violating some sort of copyright. If you sell your stuff through a platform like Etsy they will look into this and make a decision. You could also report them for harassment if they don’t leave you alone.

When you receive a DMCA takedown request then you just take the item down. No further legal action would happen.

However if she’s claiming to have invented the pattern (doubtful) AND she’s created the fabric and you stole the pattern (again, doubtful) but didn’t, she really can’t do much at all. There’s a lot of people selling masks right now and it’s pretty common (sadly) for nasty sellers to try and scare away new ones with threats of frivolous suits.

There is a lot of disagreement on copyright issues over a pattern. Many will argue that to take someone else’s pattern, make the product and sell it is unethical and infringes on copyright, but this is a legal gray area and it can’t really be enforced as it’s akin to someone trying to sue you for using music notes to make a song.

Also, if you’re on Etsy there’s a sub, r/EtsySellers I believe. They can help you too!

Alternatively, sometimes shop owners will mass report everyone else in their niche in attempts to increase their own sales. Usually only lasts a few days before they get caught doing it.

This happens on Etsy sometimes with people reporting everyone who sells anything even remotely similar to theirs to clear out the market. I remember a few years ago somebody had filed for a patent on the process of turning men's shirts into dresses for children and was going through and reporting everyone selling a dress made from a men's shirt for infringing on her patent which legally would have been impossible to prove because if your method differed even slightly from hers it was going to pass the sniff test. In the case of designs, there are only so many ways you can make a floofy hair bow or a scrunchy so again, legally you're probably in the clear unless it's an exact replica of something distinct (ie. a hand carved hair stick that's an identical match for a unique design by another artist, not "hey I just glued this stuff from Joann's onto a barrette" or a faithful repro of a traditional hair ornament from a museum). In a legal case you're probably fine, but nobody wants to pay the money to litigate that which is what this person is counting on.

However, Etsy has no interest in hashing the issue out themselves so if you're reported they're probably going to pull it down first and ask questions later. If you can change your photos to make it look less similar to whatever their design is, Iɽ do that now and then not make more of this particular item unless by special request.


Twinkies May Find Buyer, Hostess CEO Says

Hostess Brands, the maker of the iconic Twinkies snack cakes, may find a buyer when it heads to bankruptcy court today to liquidate the 82-year-old company, the company's CEO says.

"I think we'll find buyers," CEO Gregory F. Rayburn told ABC News on Sunday. "A few have surfaced already since Friday expressing interest in the brand to acquire them."

Con Agra and Flowers Foods are among the companies that have expressed interest in Hostess, but Mexican company El Grupo Bimbo may have an edge, the Christian Science Monitor reported Saturday. Grupo Bimbo, headed by Mexican billionaire Daniel Servitje Montull, is the largest bread-baking company in the world.

Economists say part of the reason Hostess struggled was due to high sugar tariffs meant to protect local producers, the Monitor reported. Grupo Bimbo could take advantage of lower sugar prices in Mexico.

Hostess makes Twinkies as well as popular snacks including Ho Hos, Ding Dongs, Suzy Qs, Sno Balls and Wonder Bread.

Last week the company announced it would close after it imposed wage and benefit cuts to its workers, prompting a bitter nationwide strike.

"The problem has always been the cost structure, the union rules, the pension legacy, the pension cost and the cost structure," Rayburn told ABC Sunday.

On Friday he announced the company would close, saying in a statement: "We deeply regret the necessity of today's decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike. Hostess Brands will move promptly to lay off most of its 18,500-member workforce and focus on selling its assets to the highest bidders."

Frank Hurt, president of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers Union told the Wall Street Journal that there's "more than a good chance" someone would swoop in to buy the company's 30 brands and preserve jobs. He said that Twinkies and Wonder Bread are popular and they will be "produced somewhere, some time and by our members."

The company's sales had dropped over the years as mothers began swapping healthier choices to the fat-filled snack cakes and white bread. It filed for bankruptcy twice - once in 2004 and again in January.

Over the weekend, Americans who were panicked over news of the company's closure cleared the shelves of Twinkies. The cream-filled sponge cakes were in many cases re-offered for sale online at exorbitant mark-ups.

On eBay Sunday night, some ambitious sellers were listing the product for several hundred thousand dollars up to several million. One seller even offered a box of Twinkies for $15,000,000.

"It's pandemic out here. Everybody's going to grab the Hostess," one man said, describing the sentiment.

In the last few days, several people have posted new do-it-yourself Twinkie recipe videos on YouTube.


Stores Selling Out of Twinkies and other Hostess Products

The same day Hostess Brand Inc. announced it will close someone came in and bought all the Twinkies from the Village West Giant Food Store.

Hostess Brand Inc. announced Friday it filed a motion in U.S. Bankruptcy Court asking permission to close and sell assets - including its iconic brands and facilities.

Giant Store Manager Jeff Pierpoint said people came in after the announcement and "bought all the Twinkies." As of noon on Nov. 17 there were still some other varieties available.

Everything, however, was gone from the Weiss Markets on Route 873 in North Whitehall, according to Customer Service Manager Claudia Hanblovic.

"Everything except the (Wonder) bread is gone," Hanblovic said.

Hostess lovers are hoping someone will buy the company and continue producing the products but none have come forth publicly - yet. Competitors, like Tastykake, aren't talking. Tastykake was bought by Georgia-based Flowers Foods in 2011.

In a recent article in the Philadelphia Inquirier "It is not our place to talk about any other company's business," said a Flowers spokesman in a statement. "However, this is an unfortunate situation and we are very sad for all those impacted."

The Huffington Post reports: One eBay seller is auctioning off a full box of Twinkies at a starting (and staggering) price of $200,000 (shipping included) and there is also a bizarre brand of petition has been filed with the White House seeking to turn President Obama into the Hugo Chavez of Twinkies.The petition, titled "Nationalize the Twinkie industry," seeks to turn back the clock on Hostess Brands' going out of business and liquidation.

CNN Money reported: A lunch box featuring "Twinkie the Kid," a cartoon cowboy character that bears a striking resemblance to the iconic yellow cake, fetched a winning bid of $690 on Friday, after Hostess said it was seeking permission from a federal bankruptcy court to close down all its bakeries.

A Friday press release from Hostess reads: The wind down means the closure of 33 bakeries, 565 distribution centers, approximately 5,500 delivery routes and 570 bakery outlet stores throughout the United States.

"We deeply regret the necessity of today's decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike," said Gregory F. Rayburn, chief executive officer. "Hostess Brands will move promptly to lay off most of its 18,500-member workforce and focus on selling its assets to the highest bidders."

In a letter to employees, Hostess writes: As you know, for many months the Company has been working with our unions, lenders and other stakeholders to reach a consensual resolution to legacy costs and labor contracts. Despite everyone's considerable efforts to move Hostess out of its restructuring, when we began implementing the Company's last, best and final offer, the Bakers Union chose to stage a crippling strike. This affected Hostess' ability to continue to make products and service its customers' needs and pushed Hostess into a Wind Down scenario. As a result, we are forced to proceed with an orderly wind down and sale of our operations and assets. We deeply regret taking this action. But we simply cannot continue to operate without the ability to produce or deliver our products.