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21 Nations Prepare for the Upcoming 2014 Rolex Swan Cup in Italy

21 Nations Prepare for the Upcoming 2014 Rolex Swan Cup in Italy


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The thrill of the much-anticipated Rolex Swan Cup will once again be experienced when it kicks off on September 8. Luxury yacht owners from all over the world will gather for a week of competition, friendship, and glamour at the Italian seaside resort of Porto Cervo in northern Sardinia. The level of sophistication experienced here is hard to match thanks to the 30-year successful partnership between Rolex, Nautor’s Swan, and the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda—three international brands synonymous with luxury and excellence. This prestigious competition will once again attract an amazing fleet of over 90 Swan yachts, including both the current superyacht range and the classics.

Rolex continues to revolutionize the luxury timepiece industry with timeless designs and cutting-edge technology; the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda has been affiliated with the Italian Sailing Federation since 1968 and aimed to organize international regattas as early as 1972; and Nautor's Swan has been recognized as a true sailor's choice, designing and building luxurious and high performance yachts in Northern Finland for nearly 50 years. The Rolex Swan Cup is a great excuse to bring these sailing yachts together to celebrate a rich tradition that showcases the craftsmanship that goes into each vessel, from the design process to production.

21 nations will be represented this year, including Austria, Australia, Belgium, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Malta, Netherlands, Romania, Russia, Spain, Sweden, and the USA. “This event truly embodies the spirit of Swan, and it is the perfect showcase of what this iconic brand stands for—excellence, passion and prestige,” says Leonardo Ferragamo, Chairman of Nautor’s Swan.

Being an owner of a Nautor Swan comes with a coveted membership to ClubSwan, and though the official home of ClubSwan is the Segelsallkapet Yacht Club in Pietarsaari, Finland, membership provides insider access to a host of regattas, cruising rendezvous, and social events all around the world. "I feel strongly for evolution, using new technologies while preserving those values that have created such a strong identity at Nautor's Swan,” adds Mr. Ferregamo.

While it’s difficult to select a team to watch with such a world-class collection of competitors this year, there are three from the United States who are ready for the challenge while sailing in their first Rolex Swan Cup. Ken Colburn’s Apparition, Phil Lotz’s Arethusa, and Charles Kenahan’s Mahalo are certainly worthy of the attention they will be receiving during their first Mediterranean competition.

The Rolex Swan Cup runs from September 8 to September 14, so make sure to pay attention next week to see if your favorite makes the Wall of Fame.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


Andy Murray

Sir Andrew Barron "Andy" Murray OBE (born 15 May 1987) is a British professional tennis player from Scotland. He has been ranked world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) for 41 weeks, and finished as the year-end No. 1 in 2016. He has won three Grand Slam singles titles – two at Wimbledon (2013 and 2016) and one at the US Open (2012) – and has reached eleven major finals. Murray was ranked in the top 10 for all but one month from July 2008 through October 2017, and finished no lower than No. 4 in eight of the nine year-end rankings during that span. Murray has won 46 ATP singles titles, including 14 ATP Masters 1000 events.

Representing Great Britain
Tennis, Summer Olympics
2012 London Men's Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Men's Singles
2012 London Mixed Doubles

Originally coached by his mother Judy alongside his older brother Jamie, Andy moved to Barcelona at age 15 to train at the Sánchez-Casal Academy. He began his professional career around the time Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal established themselves as the two dominant players in men's tennis. Murray had immediate success on the ATP Tour, making his top 10 debut in 2007 at age 19. By 2010, Murray and Novak Djokovic had separated themselves from the rest of men's tennis, joining Federer and Nadal in the Big Four, the group of players who have dominated men's tennis through the end of the next decade. Murray initially struggled against the rest of the Big Four, losing his first four major finals – three to Federer and one to Djokovic. He made his Grand Slam breakthrough in 2012 by defeating Djokovic to win the US Open. With this title, he became the first British Grand Slam singles champion since Virginia Wade in 1977, and the first male champion since Fred Perry in 1936. A month earlier, he also won a men's singles gold medal against Federer at the 2012 London Olympics.

From his first major title in 2012 through early 2016, Murray reached six major finals – all against Djokovic – including three at the Australian Open and at least one at all four majors. He only won one of these encounters, at Wimbledon in 2013. Murray had his career-best season in 2016. During that year, Murray made three major finals, winning Wimbledon for the second time. Moreover, he defended his men's singles gold medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics to become the only player with two Olympic gold medals in singles. He also became world No. 1 for the first time and clinched the year-end No. 1 ranking by winning his only ATP Finals against Djokovic. Since that year, Murray has struggled with various injuries and fell out of the top 100 in 2018 due to only seldom playing on tour.

Murray is an all-court player who excels in particular at returning serve and constructing points. He is generally regarded as having one of the best and most consistent two-handed backhands on the ATP Tour. Murray is considered a national hero in Great Britain for reestablishing the country as a leading force in men's tennis for the first time since the early 20th century. He and his brother have also led the Great Britain Davis Cup team to a title in 2015. Murray has been outspoken as a feminist, and became the second top 10 player in the history of the ATP Tour to have a female coach when he hired Amélie Mauresmo.


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