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Baja-Style Tempura Fish Tacos

Baja-Style Tempura Fish Tacos

Notes

Reprinted with permission from Tacos by Mark Miller and Benjamin Hargett, copyright © 2009. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 Cup water
  • 1/2 Cup fresh lime juice
  • 10 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 2 serrano chiles, stemmed and sliced
  • 2 Teaspoons dried Mexican oregano, ground
  • 1 Tablespoon fine sea salt
  • 2 Pounds young shark fillet, cut into 4 by 3/4 inch strips
  • 3/4 Cups plus 1 tablespoon ice water
  • 2 1/2 Teaspoons yellow mustard
  • 1 Cup bleached all-purpose flour
  • Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
  • 10 soft white corn tortillas, for serving
  • Coleslaw, for garnish
  • Lime wedges, for garnish
  • Sliced jalapeños, for garnish

Directions

To make the marinade, in a large bowl, combine the 1 ½ cups water, lime juice, garlic, chiles, oregano, and salt. Add the fish strips and let marinate for at least 20 minutes.

To make the tempura batter, in a separate bowl, whisk together the ice water and mustard. Gently stir in the flour, but don’t overmix; a few small lumps are okay. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Drain the shark pieces and pat them dry with a paper towel. Have a plate lined with paper towels ready. In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat at least 2-3 inches of oil over medium heat until it reaches 360 degrees on a deep-fat thermometer. Remove the batter from the refrigerator and stir once more. Dredge the fish pieces in the batter, a few at a time, to evenly coat. Drop them in the hot fat, 2 pieces at a time, adding 2 more pieces every 30 seconds (fry no more than 4 pieces at a time).

Monitor the temperature of the hot oil throughout frying, letting the oil return to proper temperature, if necessary, between batches; to ensure crispness, it must remain a constant 360 degrees to 380 degrees. If too low, the fish will be oily; if too hot, the pieces will burn. Fry them until crisp, light golden brown, and floating in the oil, about 2 1/2 minutes per batch. With a fine-mesh skimmer, transfer the fish tempura to the paper-towel-lined plate to absorb the excess oil. Repeat with the remaining pieces of fish. During frying, be sure to remove any pieces of floating batter, or they will burn and darken the oil, which will transfer a burned flavor to the tempura. Serve immediately. To serve, lay the tortillas side by side, open face and overlapping on a platter. Divide the slaw and filling equally between the tortillas and top with salsa and garnish. Grab, fold, and eat right away. Or build your own taco: lay a tortilla, open face, in one hand. Spoon on some slaw, then filling, top with salsa, fold, and eat right away.

Nutritional Facts

Servings5

Calories Per Serving389

Folate equivalent (total)83µg21%

Riboflavin (B2)0.3mg14.9%


For the slaw:

Juice of 1 lime plus more for serving

For the fish:

½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper

1 1/2 cups lager beer or club soda

1 1/2 lb white fish such as cod or snapper, cut into approximately 3” pieces

Serve with tortillas, hot sauce, sour cream, cilantro, and lime wedges

In a small bowl combine the onion, mango, cabbage, lime juice and a pinch of salt. Set aside.

In a large Dutch oven or heavy bottomed pot pour about 3 inches of oil. Warm over medium high until a thermometer reaches 350F°.

While the oil warms whisk together the flour, smoked paprika, cumin, garlic power, onion powder, dried oregano, dried thyme, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk in the club soda until the batter is smooth.

When the oil reaches temperature cook the fish by coating the fish in the batter completely then carefully dropping into the hot oil. Cook the fish in batches for about 4 to 5 minutes or until the fish is golden brown. Remove and let cool slightly on a tray lined with a rack.

Serve the fish tacos warm in a tortilla topped with some of the mango slaw, sour cream, cilantro, hot sauce, and a squeeze of lime.


Recipes: 'Tacos'

These recipes appear in Tacos by Mark Miller, Ten Speed Press, 2009.

Baja-Style Tempura Fish
(makes 10 tacos)

Chile-Lime Marinade
1 1/2 cups water
1/2 cup fresh lime juice
10 cloves garlic, sliced
2 serrano chiles, stemmed and sliced
2 teaspoons dried oregano, ground
1 tablespoon fine sea salt
2 pounds firm white fish like tilapia, mahi-mahi or catfish, cut into 4-inch x 3/4-inch strips

Baja Tempura Batter
3/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon ice water
2 1/2 teaspoons yellow mustard
1 cup bleached all-purpose flour
Vegetable oil, for deep-frying
10 (5 1/2-inch) soft white corn tortillas, for serving

Garnish: cabbage slaw, lime wedges, and pickled jalapeno rings .
.
1. To make the marinade, in a large bowl, combine the 1 1/2 cups water, lime juice, garlic, chiles, oregano, and salt. Add the fish strips and let marinate for at least 20 minutes.

2. To make the tempura batter, in a separate bowl, whisk together the ice water and mustard. Gently stir in the flour, but don't overmix a few small lumps are OK. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

3. Drain the fish pieces and pat them dry with a paper towel. Have a plate lined with paper towels ready. In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat at least 2 to 3 inches of oil over medium heat until it reaches 360 degrees F on a deep-fat (optional) thermometer. Remove the batter from the refrigerator and stir once more. Dredge the fish pieces in the batter, a few at a time, to evenly coat. Drop them in the hot fat, 2 pieces at a time, adding 2 more pieces every 30 seconds (fry no more than 4 pieces at a time). Monitor the temperature of the hot oil throughout frying, letting the oil return to proper temperature between batches, if necessary — to ensure crispness, it must remain a constant 360 degrees F to 380 degrees F. If too low, the fish will be oily if too hot, the pieces will burn.

4. Fry them until crisp, light golden brown, and floating in the oil, about 2 1/2 minutes per batch. With a fine-mesh skimmer, transfer the fish tempura to the paper-towel-lined plate to absorb the excess oil. Repeat with the remaining pieces of fish. During frying, be sure to remove any pieces of floating batter, or they will burn and darken the oil, which will transfer a burned flavor to the tempura. Serve immediately.

5. To serve, lay the tortillas side by side, open-face and overlapping on a platter. Divide the slaw and filling equally between the tortillas and top with salsa and garnish. Grab, fold, and eat right away. Or build your own taco: lay a tortilla, open-face, in one hand. Spoon on some slaw, then filling top with salsa, fold, and eat right away.

2 dried pasilla chiles, stemmed, seeded, dry-roasted, and rehydrated
1 dried guajillo chile, stemmed, seeded, dry-roasted, and rehydrated
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 small white onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice
7 cups water
3 tablespoons kosher salt
1 pound small Yukon gold potatoes, cut into 1/4-inch dice (with skin)
10 cloves garlic, dry-roasted
1 teaspoon chipotle puree
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon cumin seed, toasted and ground
6 (5 1/2-inch) crispy yellow corn tortilla shells
Garnish: bacon bits or toasted pine nuts

1. Cut the prepared pasilla and guajillo chiles into 1/8-inch-thick strips (rajas) set aside. In a small skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and saute until it begins to caramelize, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.

2. In a large pot, add the chile strips, the 7 cups of water, salt, and the potatoes and simmer over medium heat until the potatoes are just tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer the potato-chile mixture to a strainer and let the liquid drain off. Spoon the mixture into a bowl, add the sauteed onion, garlic, chipotle puree, black pepper, and cumin, and stir to blend. Serve immediately or keep warm in the pan until ready to serve.

3. To serve, divide the filling equally between shells and arrange in a taco holder. Or, lean the filled shells in a row, propped upright. Eat right away. To build your own, spoon some filling into a crispy shell, top with salsa and bacon bits, and eat right away.


Recipe Summary

  • 6 tomatoes, diced
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 tablespoons canned diced jalapeno peppers, or more to taste (juice reserved)
  • ½ teaspoon garlic salt
  • ½ lime, juiced
  • 3 cups coleslaw mix
  • 3 tablespoons ranch dressing
  • 2 cups vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 (9 ounce) box batter mix (such as Shore Lunch®)
  • 1 (12 fluid ounce) can or bottle Mexican beer
  • 24 corn tortillas
  • 1 pound cod fillets, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 2 cups shredded Mexican cheese blend
  • 2 limes, sliced into wedges
  • 1 dash chile-garlic sauce (such as Sriracha®) (Optional)

Mix tomatoes, onion, cilantro, jalapeno peppers, 1 tablespoon juice from jalapeno peppers, and garlic salt in a bowl squeeze 1/2 lime over salsa fresca. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate while preparing fish.

Toss coleslaw mix with ranch dressing in a bowl set aside for flavors to blend.

Heat oil in a deep-fryer or large saucepan to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

Stir batter mix and beer together in a bowl. Wrap corn tortillas in wet paper towels and set aside.

Dip cod in the batter mix fry coated cod in batches in the hot oil until cod is cooked through and coating is brown, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove cod with a slotted spoon and drain on a paper towel-lined plate.

Microwave corn tortillas on high until warmed, about 1 minute.

Stack two tortillas on a plate top with fish, a sprinkle of Mexican cheese, coleslaw mixture, salsa fresca, and a squeeze from lime wedge. Drizzle with chile-garlic sauce. Repeat with remaining ingredients.


Baja-Style Tempura Fish Tacos

cups water, lime juice, garlic, chiles, oregano and salt. Add the fish strips and let marinate for at least 20 minutes.

For the batter: In a separate bowl, whisk together the ice water and mustard. Gently stir in the flour, but don't overmix a few small lumps are OK. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Drain the fish pieces and pat them dry with a paper towel. Have a plate lined with paper towels ready.

In a large, heavy-bottomed pot, heat at least 2 to 3 inches of oil over medium heat until it reaches 360 degrees on a deep-fat thermometer. Remove the batter from the refrigerator and stir once more. Dredge the fish pieces in the batter, a few at a time, to evenly coat. Drop them in the hot oil, 2 pieces at a time, adding 2 more pieces every 30 seconds (fry no more than 4 pieces at a time). Monitor the temperature of the hot oil throughout frying, letting the oil return to proper temperature, if necessary, between batches to ensure crispness, it must remain a constant 360 to 380 degrees. If too low, the fish will be oily if too hot, the pieces will burn.

Fry them until crisp, light golden brown, and floating in the oil, about 21/2 minutes per batch. With a fine-mesh skimmer, transfer the fish tempura to the papertowel-lined plate to absorb the excess oil. Repeat with the remaining pieces of fish. During frying, be sure to remove any pieces of floating batter, or they will burn and darken the oil, which will transfer a burned flavor to the tempura.

To serve: Lay the tortillas side by side, open face and overlapping on a platter. Divide the slaw and filling equally between the tortillas and top with salsa and garnish. Grab, fold, and eat right away. Or build your own taco: lay a tortilla, open face, in one hand. Spoon on some slaw, then filling, top with salsa, fold, and eat right away.

"Tacos: 75 Authentic and Inspired Recipes" by Mark Miller (2009 Ten Speed Press)


Tempura Fish Tacos!

It’s rumored the birth of the Tempura Fish Taco occurred sometime in the 1930’s. Japanese fishermen docked in the Ensenada region of Mexico had the ingenious idea to marry their tempura style of fish with the ingredients available to them in Mexico. This was beginning of something awesome – Tempura Fish Tacos!. Since then chefs around the world have added their own special touch shredded cabbage, creamy sauces, and spices.

What’s not a rumor is using the best ingredients will deliver the best results. And with Cinco de Mayo just around the corner it’s time to get the party started!

Tempura Fish Tacos Recipe

Upper Crust Enterprises extra crispy authentic Tempura Batter mix is light, lacy and stays crispy. It has no MSG, eggs or unnecessary flavoring or preservatives. Our Tempura batter mix has a neutral flavor and can be mixed with water or any liquid for a light and crispy texture.

Visit the recipe section of our website to view our Tempura Fish Taco recipe. We use beer as our liquid, because our tempura has a neutral flavor, you can customize it any way you’d like – make your own signature Tempura Fish Taco for Cinco de Mayo!

Free Tempura Sample Kit

We are so confident that our product is superior in quality that if you are an owner, professional chef or a distributor we will send you a free tempura batter sample kit, as well as many different recipe ideas.

Take the Tempura challenge and compare. We know you’ll see and taste the difference, and most importantly, your customers will be glad you did.


Baja style fish tacos

I can’t believe today marks being in Texas for 9 months–it feels like the time has just flown by and this truly feels like home now. While I miss San Diego more than I can say, I feel like I’ve really embraced San Antonio and come to really like it here. One of the things I really freaking miss is baja style fish tacos. There are numerous little trucks all over the county where you can get fresh, delicious fish tacos for $1. None of this tilapia bullshit that plagues Texas (sorry, guys), but fresh mahi mahi or cod. A baja fish taco has specific criteria it must meet.

First, it has to be fried–not heavy breading, but light and crisp, almost tempura-like batter. Second, it has to sit on a corn tortilla (sorry flour tortilla lovers). It’s got to have some kind of crema, pico de gallo and cabbage. AND THAT’S IT. Maybe some limes on the side for squeezing. Perfectly simple and incredible. Because Texas is repping a much different style of Mexican food (and for the love of god, more tilapia than anyone should ever be exposed to), these tacos are pretty much non-existent, at least from what I have seen.

I was recently in San Diego celebrating my birthday and LITERALLY my first stop after a hellish ride from the airport was to a tiny fish taco truck. And guess what? THEIR FREAKING FRYERS WERE BROKEN. I truly haven’t been that heartbroken in a while. I had been dreaming about those tacos for days leading up to the trip, only to be denied. Truly soul crushing stuff here, guys. When I got home, naturally my craving for tacos wasn’t even the least bit satisfied. So, of course I decided to bring my favorite style of fish tacos to Texas. I have always been a lover of good beers and so when I moved here, everyone was drinking Shiner Bock and to be honest, I was skeptical. Now, it’s probably one of my favorite beers to relax with on a warm day (they did not pay me to say this, I just really love Shiner Bock).

And thus, we have a true marriage of California and Texas that is born out of this taco. The carbonation from the Shiner Bock in the batter keeps it light and crispy and gives a great, malty flavor. If Shiner Bock isn’t available where you are (I’m sorry), just grab another lighter amber beer, like a dos XX amber or something similar. And please, dear god, do not make these tacos with tilapia. Cod and mahi mahi are sold frozen in most grocery stores–don’t subject yourself to the bottom-feeder garbage that is tilapia.


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Authentic Baja Fish Taco Recipe from the Hacienda Encantada

Fish tacos are a popular food across the US and Mexico these days. Find out how to make authentic Baja style tempura battered fish tacos from the chef at the Hacienda Encantada in Cabo San Lucas. Cooking classes can be enjoyed as part of the resort experience. This Traveling Mom had so much fun at the cooking class that she considered it the highlight of her stay. Make this Baja fish taco recipe and find out why she can&rsquot stop thinking about it.

The Hacienda Encantada Resort & Spa is nestled in the mountains of Cabo San Lucas and overlooks the Sea of Cortez. With fresh seafood teaming the sea, it&rsquos no wonder these fish tacos taste better in Cabo than they do anywhere else. It also doesn&rsquot hurt that the chefs are well trained.

Authentic Baja Fish Taco Recipe from the Hacienda Encantada

The cooking class at the Hacienda Encantada was by far the highlight of the trip for me. While I love excursions and relaxing by the beach, the cooking class offered something different than the usual all-inclusive beach vacation. It was a lot of fun to get dressed up and pretend to be a chef too!

Even though these tacos taste better in Cabo, it is pretty easy to recreate them at home and be satisfied.

  • 1 pound of sea bass
  • 6 flour tortilla
  • 8 cups of corn oil
  • 1 C. of guacamole
  • 1 C. of Mexican salsa
  • 1 C. of cabbage salad
  • 2 C. of tempura paste
  1. Heat corn oil in a heavy Dutch oven over medium high heat.
  2. Cut the fish in the form of fish fingers, then season with salt and pepper and dip it in the tempura paste until it completely covers the piece of fish.
  3. Cook fish in hot oil until it is a deep golden tone.
  4. Place one finger of fish in the middle of each tortilla and top with cabbage salad, guacamole, and Mexican salsa.

The cooking class was such a hit. Not only did we learn how to make the fish tacos, but we also learned how to make fresh guacamole and pico de gallo.

Check out this YouTube video to see a quick recap of the pico de gallo:

The cooking course offered so many tips that I never thought of when making authentic Baja cuisine. My favorite tip was how to correctly cut cilantro. You have to watch the video to see how to do it properly. I&rsquom still trying to perfect it!

Try the Tequila Tasting Too

Another perk of the cooking class was the tequila tasting after the meal. If you want to do the same, just ask the concierge to set it up for you. The sommelier will be happy to teach you all about the different types of tequila.

The sommelier also taught us about the agave plant that produces the tequila. Did you know that true tequila only comes from one region of Mexico? It was such a cool experience to learn how different tequila is made and the origins.

My main take-away from this trip is that no matter where I travel from now on, I&rsquove got to take a cooking class if it&rsquos offered! If I can learn how to cook a regional dish everywhere I travel, I may be a culinary expert before I know it.

While I may not be an expert in Baja cuisine just yet, I do feel like I&rsquove mastered the Baja style fish tacos and I&rsquoll always think fondly on my time in Cabo anytime I make this recipe.


Recipe Chef Notes + Tips

Make-Ahead: These fish tacos are meant to be eaten right away but you can keep the fish warm on a sheet tray lined with a rack in the oven at 250°. You can also prep all of the toppings, salsa, and sauce up to 1 day ahead of time.

How to Reheat: Place the desired amount of fish onto a sheet tray lined with parchment paper and bake in the oven at 350° for 6-8 minutes or until hit.

How to Store: Place the cooked fish in a container with a lid and keep it in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. The fish will not freeze well if they are battered and fried. All of the toppings will last up to 3 days covered in the refrigerator.

Mayonnaise is similar to crema accept crema has a higher acidity amount since it has more buttermilk fat in it. It’s delicious and much thinner than mayonnaise but both will work well.

I like to use sunflower oil when frying the fish, but you can use whatever you’d like.

The battered fish will unfortunately not cook in an air-fryer or oven.

There will be plenty of leftover salsa for you to eat with chips or serve with another recipe.

Please feel free to use either green or red cabbage or a combination of both.

The batter will look very similar to a tempura batter.

You will be able to fry 5-7 battered fillets of fish at a time.


Watch the video: ALIEN SEA SNAIL Japanese Street Food (November 2021).