Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Watching Cooking Shows Can Make You Fat

Watching Cooking Shows Can Make You Fat


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Sorry, Food Network junkies

iStockPhoto

Most of the dishes we see being cooked on TV aren't too healthy.

When you sit down and binge-watch a whole bunch of cooking shows, do you then get up and decide to cook a little something for yourself? If so, you’re probably heavier than those who don’t, according to a study from the journal Appetite.

Researchers, including one from Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, conducted a survey of 501 women aged 20 to 35 and found that those who watched cooking shows weighed more than those who didn’t. And those who watched cooking shows and emulated the recipes at home weighed the most of all, about 10 pounds more than those who didn’t watch any cooking shows.

So let me get this straight: If you like food enough to watch cooking shows, and if you like cooking enough to actually cook some of the recipes you see on cooking shows, you might weigh a little more than those who don’t? Wow, who’d have thunk it!?


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Reasons Why Food Network Shows Are Totally Fake

Since the early '90s, Food Network has been educating us, entertaining us, and indulging our deep carnal desire to watch food get prepared, cooked, and eaten. They even have a hit show that's just chefs sitting around talking about great meals they've personally eaten. And although numerous stars got their start making deliciously unhealthy, semi-homemade meals in 30 minutes or less on the cable stalwart, things on the screen aren't always what they seem.

For example, did you know that Iron Chef contestants aren't really surprised by the "secret ingredient?" Or how about Everyday Italian host Giada de Laurentiis' alleged practice of spitting food into a "dump bucket in between takes in order to maintain her enviable figure? Yep, it turns out there's some pretty shady prep work going on in order to crank out these popular culinary shows.

Here's a not-so-sweet (or savory) look into why Food Network shows are totally fake.


Watch the video: Από την πόλη στην Ανατολή - Μουδανιά (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Chano

    Speak to the point

  2. Prewitt

    I think you will allow the mistake. Enter we'll discuss it.

  3. Aldrin

    I consider, that you are mistaken. I can defend my position. Email me at PM.

  4. Clintwood

    I consider, that you are mistaken. I propose to discuss it.

  5. Hackett

    Absolutely with you it agree. In it something is also idea excellent, I support.



Write a message