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This Couple Had a Delta Air Lines-Themed Wedding: See the Photos

This Couple Had a Delta Air Lines-Themed Wedding: See the Photos

We’re going to tell you this plane and simple: A married couple from Memphis threw a Delta-themed wedding reception. The 34-year-old rabbi travels often for business, so choosing one airline to dedicate millions of miles to was like “deciding I would marry Delta,” he said in a Delta press release.

Little did he know, the airline would play a huge role in his relationship with Bess Wohlner. The two met at a conference in 2008 and went to rabbinical school together in 2009. They frequently flew out of Delta’s Los Angeles hub for student assignments, and eventually Wohlner agreed to do a “mileage run” with Simons to accrue SkyMiles. The two spent 47 hours together — flying two laps around the country — without ever leaving the airports. That’s when she knew he was the one.


The pair went their separate ways for several years until they reconnected on a flight from New York to Tel Aviv.

"I knew it was love when he handed off one of his upgrades and delivered his first class meal to me from the front of the plane," Wohlner said. So it only made sense that the couple announced their engagement with a “Diamond Status” save-the-date. Oh, and their entire wedding and ceremony revolved around Delta — décor, food, and fashion.


Bridesmaids lined the altar in navy blue dresses and groomsmen sported matching yarmulkes accented by red flowers. Simons and Wohlner walked down the aisle at Temple Israel in Memphis on a Delta-branded mat and were married by a fellow frequent flier.


At the ceremony, seating arrangements were assigned via bag tags, and each of the 12 tables represented a city important to the newlyweds’ relationship. Waiters dressed like flight attendants served light bites, beverages in Delta-branded cups, and Delta-printed cocktail napkins. The wedding cake was Biscoff cookie-flavored — the airline distributes these onboard — and dessert was served on the couple’s own beverage carts.


As favors, guests were given TUMI amenity kits, which Delta normally hands out to all first-class passengers. Currently, the company offers a monogrammed bag with hand cleanser, mouthwash, lip balm, hand and body lotion, aloe vera, oatmeal, toothpaste, tissues, ear plugs, eyeshades, and striped socks. Partygoers also enjoyed a photo booth with a green screen that simulated an airplane interior. Oxygen masks and decommissioned seats (from the couple’s living room) were used as props.


No surprise here: Simons and Wohlner are jet-setting around the globe for their honeymoon. The happy husband and wife will visit Delta stops in Scotland, Amsterdam, Sri Lanka, Sydney, Melbourne, Vancouver, and Seattle — home to several of 50 travel clichés that are actually worth experiencing.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

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The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

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The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

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Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Love is in the air: They met on a plane, and then married on one too

Actress Vjera Mujovic, center front, and Stefan Preis, left rear, tied the knot May 6 up in the air. The two married on a commercial Turkish Airlines flight from Belgrade, Serbia, to Istanbul.

The wedding ring inscriptions say it all: 5B and 5C. Those are the seats that Serbian actress Vjera Mujovic and German doctor Stefan Preis took on a Turkish Airlines flight to Mongolia a year ago.

This would be the meet-cute, if this were a Hollywood movie script. But it isn’t -- it’s a true-to-life travel story.

The two met on the plane, just happened to be seated together and a year later said “I do” May 6 on a Turkish Airlines commercial flight -- booked in the same seats -- from Belgrade to Istanbul. (Watch the wedding and their love story below.)

Friends and family were on board to witness the Wedding in the Clouds, as it was called. The airline provided food, violins, rose petals and a wedding cake.

“New destination wedding location: a plane! This couple even met on a plane,” Yahoo Travel tweeted.

Of course Vjera and Stefan aren’t the only two people who fell in love on a plane (though they may be among the few to get married on one).

Two flight attendants on an Air Canada flight fell in love over the food cart and were married a year later, according to stories in “Love at First Flight: Readers Tell Tales of Travel Romance” published last year in the Toronto Globe and Mail.

“We were working the same aisle on the flight, and every time he passed me the orange juice over our drink cart, I blushed like mad. He asked me if I was okay, much to my embarrassment,” Danielle Wilson writes.

Kim Brechin knows the feeling. By the time she checked in for her Delta Air Lines flight, her seat had apparently been given away to a standby passenger. She managed to get a spot on the flight, but the seat was taken by a “gentlemanly” man who offered to move.

He said “no problem, he liked the aisle and asked if I would care to sit by the window. (This is what I call our first compromise),” Brechin wrote.

Explore California, the West and beyond with the weekly Escapes newsletter.

You may occasionally receive promotional content from the Los Angeles Times.

As Los Angeles Times assistant Travel editor, Mary Forgione writes and edits stories for the digital and print Travel section. She loves tips and stories about running, hiking and anything to do with the outdoors. She also writes The Wild, a weekly newsletter featuring insider tips on the best of Southern California beaches, trails, parks, deserts, forests and mountains.

More From the Los Angeles Times

Disney’s Spider-Man ride continues the park’s shift toward interactive, game-like experiences. Black Panther warriors inspire.

Until June 15, Disneyland is for California residents only due to COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. Cast member insights on a day experiencing reduced-capacity lines.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

Las Vegas nearly ground to a halt during the pandemic. Casinos and restaurants are set to return to full capacity Tuesday, but many hospitality workers wonder whether they’ll ever make up their losses.

A trove of court documents and inspection reports released last month reveal the extent of the Queen Mary’s disrepair.

An off-duty firefighter killed a fellow firefighter and critically wounded a captain in a shooting at Agua Dulce fire station Tuesday morning, officials said.

The COVID-19 death toll on Kauai is two. But Hawaii’s outermost main island is struggling economically.

Jobs will come back and the state’s economy will recover faster than the nation’s, a UCLA forecast says, led by consumer spending, tech jobs and home-building

The Olympic trials for surfing are being held in El Salvador. The seeds for this were planted decades ago by young Californians looking for good waves.

Southwest Airlines is pushing back plans to resume selling alcohol on flights after a recent increase in unruly passengers

The measures would be voluntary and meant to ease travelers’ compliance with other countries’ foreign entry requirements, administration officials said.


Watch the video: Why I Just Bought More DELTA AIRLINE Stock (December 2021).