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How to Make Di Palo's Mozzarella Slideshow

How to Make Di Palo's Mozzarella Slideshow

Making mozzarella with Lou Di Palo in Little Italy

Maryse Chevriere

Curd, or cagliata in Italian, is the fat and protein by-product of milk that has been separated from whey.

The Curd

Maryse Chevriere

Curd, or cagliata in Italian, is the fat and protein by-product of milk that has been separated from whey.

Cutting the Massive Curd

Maryse Chevriere

Di Palo’s uses fresh mass curd that gets cut into smaller squares before heating. For personal use, you can purchase one of these smaller pieces, cut to order.

Grandma Di Palo's Chitarra

Maryse Chevriere

The chitarra — Italian for guitar — cuts down the squares of curd before they hit the hot water. This particular chitara has been in the family for three generations and is a more traditional tool than a knife or machine.

Re-cooking and Neutralizing the Curd

Maryse Chevriere

Drop the curd into 180 degree water that has a little whey and a little butter fat. “We want to neutralize the curd,” says Lou, “so let it sit there for a few minutes.” The cold curd will bring the temperature down to roughly 145 degrees.

Bringing the Curd Back to Temperature

Maryse Chevriere

After the curd has been neutralized, replace some of the cooler water with hot water and bring the temperature back up to 160 degrees.

Working the Curds

Maryse Chevriere

“He’s working the curds till it’s one big, tender mass of curds,” explains Lou. This step is really where experience pays off, as the right texture isn’t obvious to the untrained eye. And let's not forget, that cheese demands a pair of weathered hands -- it's still about 160 degrees.

Stretch it Like Taffy

Maryse Chevriere

Just before balling the mozzarella, Lou says they look for "a taffy-like consistency," and most importantly that you "know how to understand the stretch.” Lou and René definitely ‘understand the stretch’ and recognize the perfect consistency before moving forward.

Mozzare!

Maryse Chevriere

Mozzarella comes from the word mozzare, meaning to tear off. At this point Lou and René begin to pull off various sizes of mozzarella from the mass to shape it.

This little knot, or nodini, goes great in olive oil marinades.

Shock It

Maryse Chevriere

Place the shaped mozzarella into cold water to shock the outer layer. Lou tells us that this crucial step “creates a shell but at the same time maintains the creamy texture.”

Salt Water Bath

Maryse Chevriere

Transport the mozzarella from the cold water to the cold salt water where it picks up extra flavor from the coarse Sicilian sea salt. But how do you know how much salt to use? “So it tastes like the sea,” says Sal Di Palo.

The Perfect Ball

Maryse Chevriere

TDM: “What’s the secret to making such perfect looking, perfect tasting mozzarella?”

Lou Di Palo: “The secret is experience. The more you do it, the more efficient you become.”

The Perfect Taste

Maryse Chevriere

“Good mozzarella should drip the milk.” By all standards, this is definitely good mozzarella.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


How to Make Fresh Mozzarella From Scratch

Niki Achitoff-Gray the editor-in-chief at Serious Eats and a graduate of the Institute of Culinary Education. She's pretty big into oysters, offal, and most edible things.

At Serious Eats, we're lucky enough to work right across the street from Di Palo Selects, an Italian fine-foods store that just happens to make some of the best fresh mozzarella I've ever tasted. It's milky, tender, and mild, with a faint layer of cream beneath the skin that gushes a little when you slice it. In other words, this isn't that stiff, tough ball of vacuum-sealed supermarket mozzarella, and it's definitely not the low-moisture cooking mozzarella that you throw on pizzas or lasagnas. It's mozzarella for savoring on its own, perhaps with a sprinkle of sea salt, or torn up for a simple Caprese salad. This mozzarella? You buy it when it's still warm, and it never goes into the fridge.

But what about those of us who don't have the benefit of living or working close to a great fresh-mozzarella source? Is there a way that everyone out there can get their hands on the good stuff? A quick Google search for homemade mozzarella will give you an emphatic yes: There are countless recipes for fresh mozzarella and dozens of different DIY kits for sale, all of which promise better-than-store-bought results. Unfortunately, it also doesn't take much testing to realize that there's a whole lot more to making excellent fresh mozzarella than the right equipment and a reliable recipe. While experience doesn't hurt, it really all boils down to the milk.


Watch the video: Di Palo Balsamic Vinegar (November 2021).