Ron de Barrilito 3 Stars

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4

1 rating

January 28, 2014

By

Jess Novak

Jane Bruce

This sipping rum needs no accompaniments: it solo beautifully all on its own.

1

Servings

Related Recipes

Ingredients

  • 1.5 Ounces Ron de Barrilito

Directions

Enjoy this drink neat or on the rocks in a rocks glass.

Tags


Florida bars share their secret recipes for rum punch

Historically, sailors have excelled at many things. Navigation, for example. Knot tying. And certainly, drinking. They knocked back a considerable amount of beer on any given voyage, of course, but as these salty men headed farther and farther from Old Blighty and other points north, the wondrous warmer climes – pleasant though they oft may have been – had one nasty folly: it spoiled the brew.

But sailors (or perhaps simply enthusiastic imbibers) can also be creative. And so, using ingredients native to the regions in which they sailed, things like rum, citrus and spice, they cobbled together something beautiful: punch. It eventually found its way into the mainstream, which relieved it of its lustier, leaded elements and rendered it suitable for children.

Thankfully, though, its history as the beverage of adventurers has not been forgotten. And bartenders, too, excel at many things.

Punches, from classic recipe to brand-new spin, are appearing on the menus of many fine establishments these days. Here are four such libations, created by those who seek to preserve the drink's colorful history and further it along on the path of cocktail evolution.


Ruminations

I bought this pair of rums based on decent reviews, decent prices, and my never having had a Puerto Rican rum. The bottle is of the plainest “bar style” with a plastic cap. There is no age statement on either bottle. The labeling is pretty much the same with the lighter called “Calidad Extra” and the darker “Superior Especiale”

I decided to review them together because having tasted them, now through about a third of each bottle, they are still very similar. Imagine two brothers, an older and a younger whose family resemblance is remarkable. Neither can be mistaken for the other for one has matured by some further years. Still that they began with the same stock seems indisputable. It is that way with these two rums.

In the glass the 2-star is very light in color, similar to Barbancourt 5-star, and a little darker than Papa’s Pilar light. Swirled it makes lots of thin quick legs and a few thicker ones. The aroma is bright. At 43% ABV this rum is slightly more alcoholic than most of my others. It has alcohol and some acetone on the nose, but not as much as I usually find in a “young rum” a little sharp when you first pour it. There is fermented banana, apricot, a little pineapple. There don’t seem to be any darker notes in this rum, just fruit. The Rum Project gives it 5g/l added sugar, very low. When sipped there is sweetness of light brown sugar, a slight creaminess, again bright fruits. The finish starts off short with some burnt caramel bitterness, but gets longer, smoother, and sweeter as you progress through the glass. It does have a little fire, but pleasantly so. I think the Barbancourt 5-star for $2 more is more complex as is Pussers, but this is not at all a bad rum at its price point ($23 around me).

The 3-star is of course the older brother. In the glass it is darker by a shade than its sibling, a little darker than English Harbour and perhaps Pusser’s by a whisker. Not a dark rum by any means, but a beautiful amber still on the lighter side. Swirled, it makes fast medium legs. I expect a little more creaminess from this one. The Rum Project lists its added sugar at 7g/l, a little bit more than the 2-star, but still very low. The nose has the same sharp alcohol as the 2-star, a little less acetone, all the same fruits, and in addition something like light raisin and burnt brown sugar or caramel and a hint of tobacco. The darker notes are there but subtle. The brighter fruits still stand out. Sipped the burn is similar (also 43% ABV) to the 2-star, slightly more fiery than most of my rums. The sweetness level is about the same as the younger rum, and the apricot, banana, and maybe even the pineapple. As you go through the glass a little burnt orange also shows up. All along there is a little more creaminess, and the sweetness is more that of a darker brown sugar. The finish is medium with a little butter and more burnt brown sugar. The 3-star tastes remarkably like its younger brother with a little more complexity as behooves a more mature sibling. At $33 dollars it competes with the likes of English Harbour ($31 recently) and Pampero Aniversario R.E. ($35) both of which are better in my opinion.

Cigar pairing potential? I smoked three or four different cigars with each of these rums. I didn’t notice anything outstanding, but then there weren’t any clashes either. Either is a good rum with lighter or darker cigars. Even the fruits of the 2-star went OK with the bitter coco and coffee of an Asylum Nyctophilia.

Would I buy these again? I think they are both good offerings at their price points. There are other rums I like better at those price points, but this would be purely a matter of taste. You might easily find these two better than the competitors I would select. In any case their price is not out of line with their quality. If you like Barbancourt 5-star you should at least try the 2-star and if you like English Harbour, give the 3-star a go.


Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star

Ron del Barrilito 3 Star rum is produced in Bayamón Puerto Rico by the Fernández family, which has been producing rum in the area since 1804, making it the oldest rum manufacturer in Puerto Rico. The rum is first blended and then aged for a minimum of 6 years.

A single barrel of Ron del Barrilito rum was set aside in 1942 called the 'Freedom Barrel.' When Puerto Rico gains its independence the Freedom Barrel will be opened in the Bayamón town square for all to share.

7.3 /10
135 ratings
Recommendable to most

Rate Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star

135 Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star ratings

One of my favourite 9 out of 10

Posted 7 years ago by Simone from Sweden with 3 ratings

Excellent rum with one of the best value for money rate! Smooth sweet and a hint of smokiness. Love it

The best Puerto Rican rum 10 out of 10

Posted 4 years ago by mdk from Puerto Rico with 11 ratings

"Barrilito tres estrellas" is a classic still produced the same way as in the 19th century. Hard to find outside of PR -- in PR, it's the cheapest sipping rum -- at $20-25 per bottle, it's better than most rums twice that much. Perfect with a couple of rocks, or if you have to mix it, with a bit of dry cranberry and soda. Do not use it for cuba libres -- it would be a waste!

A good rum! 7 out of 10

Posted over 5 years ago by Falcon91Wolvrn03 (PREMIUM) from United States with 471 ratings

This is a pretty good rum. Molasses, smoke, pepper, oak, almond, sherry, and even a light touch of orange.

It's a good rum, though I think it's a little hot at 43%abv (I think only the 8 and above rated rums do really well at that alcohol content). Still, a very decent rum for the money, and one I would recommend for the cost.

A hidden gem 10 out of 10

Posted over 5 years ago by Giovanni from Italy with 1 rating

With its nice and smooth smoky aroma, it was a surprise. The price is very low for such a great Rum.

RIDICULOUSLY good for the price 9 out of 10

Posted almost 4 years ago by ChameleonSkin from United States with 18 ratings

Every time I've gone to pick up a bottle of this (and I've gone through plenty), I'm absolutely floored by the fact that this is a sub-$40 bottle of rum. It's smooth, and lush, with a wonderful balance of caramel, vanilla, and oak, while still having that clean, refined mouthfeel that you expect from a column-still rum. It's fantastic on its own, and remains one of my favorite components of most tiki drinks as well. It absolutely shines in a mai tai with a good Jamaican pot-still as a funky counterpoint (I'd suggest my favorite, Appleton 12-year). It's also essential to a good zombie or jet pilot.

If you're drinking on its own, just be prepared for the fact that this has minimal or no added sugar it's not going to be a Diplomatico Reserva Exclusiva or a Zaya. It's dry and clean like a Spanish sherry. It's a much better palate cleanser than a digestif.

As a mixer, I have yet to find a drink in which this doesn't shine. It has this magical ability to play nice with others while still not having its own unique flavors lost among others. I've used it in a Coronado Luaus special before which has somewhere in the neighborhood of 10-12 ingredients, and I can still pick out the unique notes of the Ron del Barrilito even in that setting.


IT'S ALL IN THE DETAILS

The nosing finds mature smells of molasses, honey, milk chocolate and nougat. The palate entry is a touch smoky and very sweet the honey and molasses tastes come to the fore at the midpalate. Finish is warm, comfortable and mature.

Medium body with a natural dark reddish color. Aromas of almonds, vanilla, raisins, and bananas with a strong woody backbone. Very smooth and fruity sweetness with a lingering smoky finish.

An impeccable blend of rums aged between 6 and 10 years in vintage american white oak sherry barrels. It’s a wonderful sipping rum best enjoyed neat. Maybe just a splash of water or on the rocks, but you already know that great spirits need little enhancement.

The nosing finds mature smells of molasses, honey, milk chocolate and nougat. The palate entry is a touch smoky and very sweet the honey and molasses tastes come to the fore at the midpalate. Finish is warm, comfortable and mature.

Medium body with a natural dark reddish color. Aromas of almonds, vanilla, raisins, and bananas with a strong woody backbone. Very smooth and fruity sweetness with a lingering smoky finish.

An impeccable blend of rums aged between 6 and 10 years in vintage american white oak sherry barrels. It’s a wonderful sipping rum best enjoyed neat. Maybe just a splash of water or on the rocks, but you already know that great spirits need little enhancement.


Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star

Ron del Barrilito 3 Star rum is produced in Bayamón Puerto Rico by the Fernández family, which has been producing rum in the area since 1804, making it the oldest rum manufacturer in Puerto Rico. The rum is first blended and then aged for a minimum of 6 years.

A single barrel of Ron del Barrilito rum was set aside in 1942 called the 'Freedom Barrel.' When Puerto Rico gains its independence the Freedom Barrel will be opened in the Bayamón town square for all to share.

7.3 /10
135 ratings
Recommendable to most

Rate Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star

135 Ron Del Barrilito 3 Star ratings

Family Tradition 8 out of 10

Posted 1 year ago by Daniel.delvalle from United States with 19 ratings

My family has drank this rum for generations. This is a full bodied rum strong notes of molasses and the oakiness from the Whiskey barrels that it was stored in. Drink straight on the rocks with a slice of pineapple or another juicy sweet fruit to bring out the sweetness

One of my favourite 9 out of 10

Posted 7 years ago by Simone from Sweden with 3 ratings

Excellent rum with one of the best value for money rate! Smooth sweet and a hint of smokiness. Love it

The best Puerto Rican rum 10 out of 10

Posted 4 years ago by mdk from Puerto Rico with 11 ratings

"Barrilito tres estrellas" is a classic still produced the same way as in the 19th century. Hard to find outside of PR -- in PR, it's the cheapest sipping rum -- at $20-25 per bottle, it's better than most rums twice that much. Perfect with a couple of rocks, or if you have to mix it, with a bit of dry cranberry and soda. Do not use it for cuba libres -- it would be a waste!

A good rum! 7 out of 10

Posted over 5 years ago by Falcon91Wolvrn03 (PREMIUM) from United States with 471 ratings

This is a pretty good rum. Molasses, smoke, pepper, oak, almond, sherry, and even a light touch of orange.

It's a good rum, though I think it's a little hot at 43%abv (I think only the 8 and above rated rums do really well at that alcohol content). Still, a very decent rum for the money, and one I would recommend for the cost.

A hidden gem 10 out of 10

Posted over 5 years ago by Giovanni from Italy with 1 rating

With its nice and smooth smoky aroma, it was a surprise. The price is very low for such a great Rum.

RIDICULOUSLY good for the price 9 out of 10

Posted almost 4 years ago by ChameleonSkin from United States with 18 ratings

Every time I've gone to pick up a bottle of this (and I've gone through plenty), I'm absolutely floored by the fact that this is a sub-$40 bottle of rum. It's smooth, and lush, with a wonderful balance of caramel, vanilla, and oak, while still having that clean, refined mouthfeel that you expect from a column-still rum. It's fantastic on its own, and remains one of my favorite components of most tiki drinks as well. It absolutely shines in a mai tai with a good Jamaican pot-still as a funky counterpoint (I'd suggest my favorite, Appleton 12-year). It's also essential to a good zombie or jet pilot.

If you're drinking on its own, just be prepared for the fact that this has minimal or no added sugar it's not going to be a Diplomatico Reserva Exclusiva or a Zaya. It's dry and clean like a Spanish sherry. It's a much better palate cleanser than a digestif.

As a mixer, I have yet to find a drink in which this doesn't shine. It has this magical ability to play nice with others while still not having its own unique flavors lost among others. I've used it in a Coronado Luaus special before which has somewhere in the neighborhood of 10-12 ingredients, and I can still pick out the unique notes of the Ron del Barrilito even in that setting.


Rum substitutions

I've been asked on a couple of occasions about rum substitutions for cocktail recipes. For instance, if a recipe calls for Gold Puerto Rican rum, what sorts of rums will fit the bill? Similarly, if a recipe calls for something specific that you may not have on hand, such as Appleton VX, what can be used in its place?

This is not an exhaustive list though I endeavor to update it as I try new rums. This general information is also available via Beachbum Berry's books, and other locations online.

Silver Puerto Rican rum

The clear sibling of Gold Puerto Rican Rum, silver Puerto Rican rum (discussed in E2 of 5 Minutes of Rum) is also a Spanish (or Cuban) style rum. And like the gold, it's typically a relatively dry, column-distilled rum with some amount of aging. I typically use Don Q Cristal or Cruzan Aged rum. Bacardi Superior is the market leader in this category, but there are several well-regarded options available.

Cruzan Aged (US Virgin Islands)

Don Q Cristal (Puerto Rico)

Flor de Caña 4 Extra Dry (Nicaragua)

Montanya Plantino Light Rum (US)

Ron Matusalem Plantino (Dominican Republic)

Gold Puerto Rican rum

Like it says on the tin, amber colored rum from Puerto Rico, therefore a Spanish (or Cuban) style rum, such as Bacardi Gold or Don Q Añejo. Typically a relatively dry, column-distilled rum with some amount of aging. I typically substitute Cruzan Aged Amber rum, a Spanish-style rum from the US Virgin Islands. If you want to go up the ladder a little, try Ron del Barrilito Two Star.

Cruzan Aged Amber (US Virgin Islands)

Ron del Barrilito Two Star (Puerto Rico)

Flor de Caña Gold 4 (Nicaragua)

Ron Barcelo Anejo (Dominican Republic)

Gold Virgin Islands rum

Very similar to Gold Puerto Rican Rum, so much so that it's the perfect substitute for Gold Puerto Rican rums (see entry above). A relatively dry, column-distilled Spanish-style rum with some amount of aging, but a very light body compared to aged Spanish-style gold rums. I normally stock Cruzan Aged rum at home as it's readily available.

Cruzan Aged (US Virgin Islands)

Flor de Caña Gold 4 (Nicaragua)

Barbados rum

Amber, medium-bodied rum from the island of Barbados. I discussed one of my favorites, Plantation Grande Reserve 5 year in episode 1. There are many good rums in this category. Barbados rums tend to be a little more flavorful than Gold Puerto Rican rums because they're an English-style rum. In a pinch you could swap a Gold Puerto Rican rum for a gold Barbados rum, but the cocktail won't taste exactly as intended by the creator. When your recipe calls for Barbados rum, reach for one of these:

Planation Grande Reserve 5 year

Gold Jamaican rum

An English-style rum from the island of Jamaica. Usually a combination of pot and column distilled and then aged. Jamaican rums have a distinct essence that usually manifests itself as someone saying it has a "funkiness". Appleton rules this category in the US, for they represent most of the commonly-found Gold Jamaican rums on US shelves. For more information on this category, check out E6 of 5 Minutes of Rum.

Appleton Signature, formerly known as V/X (my default)

Smith & Cross - Your mileage may vary on this substitution. This is one of my favorite rums in any category, but it's overproof (114) and very distinctive so it'll alter the flavor of the cocktail it goes into so experiment with it. I use it in Mai Tais and Navy Grogs to great effect.

Dark Jamaican rum

Episode 3 of 5 Minutes of Rum is an introduction to this deep-bodied style of rum from Jamaica. Myers owns the category and is the easiest to find, though my personal preference is Plantation Xaymaca (better flavor) or Coruba (better color).

Plantation Xaymaca (technically a gold Jamaican, but I deploy it as though it was a Dark Jamaican rum)

Demerara rum

One of the holy grail rums in vintage tropical cocktail recipes. Full bodied, dark caramel color, and a touch of smokiness. Lemon Hart is the go-to name, though distribution comes and goes in the US. All Demerara rum comes from Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) in Guyana. They sell bulk rum to others and market their own line under the name El Dorado. The El Dorado rums are quite good and readily available. Stick to El Dorado 8 or 12 for mixing (though slip in the 15 when you're feeling fancy). Hamilton 86, from Ministry of Rum creator Ed Hamilton, is currently my go-to Demerara mixing rum. Outside of the US there are a larger number of merchant bottlings of Demerara rum. I regretfully have tried none of them.

El Dorado 5 (go for the 8 if you can find it, the 5 is light in the characteristics of this category).

El Dorado 21 - Don't mix this one. Enjoy it neat.

Pusser's Navy rum - see disclaimer*

* In a pinch and can't find one of the above "full Demerara" rums? While not 100% Demerara, Pusser's Navy rum contains a blend of 5 rums hailing from Trinidad and Guyana. The Guyanese component contains some distillate from the fabled the Port Mourant double wooden pot still of DDL. So while not an exact swap, it's absolutely in the family and Pusser's (as of February 2016) seems to have stable distribution in the US.

Dark rum (non-Jamaican):

This is sort of a nebulous term this section deserves a revamp for more distinction. But until then. these are fuller bodied rums, similar in appearance to Dark Jamaican rums, but are not straight substitutes for Dark Jamaican rum. That's not to say you can't swap them out, but you'll be altering the recipe and may need to tweak it further to retain balance in your cocktail. Kōloa makes one such dark rum: Kōloa Kauai Dark Hawaiian Rum. I find it to have more prominent spice notes (but not to be confused with their actual spiced rum - maybe just listen in to E22 for more detail on that). Another very good dark, but not really Jamaican, rum is Plantation Original Dark rum, featured in episode 19.

Kōloa Kauai Dark Hawaiian rum

Plantation Original Dark rum

Lost Spirits Polynesian rum

Denizen Merchant's Reserve (as of August 2014, my go-to rum for a Trader Vic's style Mai Tai)

Overproof rum, specifically "151 class" overproof

This category can be a bit of a can of worms.

Lemon Hart 151: In the realm of classic Donn Beach tiki drinks, the overproof you need is Lemon Hart 151. It is a dark, smoky overproof Demerara English-style rum. At the time of this update (April 2015), Lemon Hart 151 remains unavailable in the United States. About 3-4 years ago, the last of the old "yellow label" Lemon Hart went off the market. After a dry spell, Lemon Hart 151 was re-introduced courtesy of Ed Hamilton of the Ministry of Rum who distributed it for the producer here in the US. The label was updated to a different look (red, more scripting on the letters). This was, by and large, the same rum and was perfectly suited for your 1934 Zombies. For more information, please see episode 9 of this here podcast. In the May of 2014, word got out that Lemon Hart 151 was being taken off of the US market "until mid-2015" by the owner of the brand (not Ed Hamilton). If you see a bottle, grab a bottle.

As of 2017, Lemon Hart has returned to the US market with their signature 151, as well as a reformulated 80 proof and a spiced rum. The new new Lemon Hart 151 is a good pickup.

Hamilton 151 Overproof: Ed Hamilton, who has recently been bottling his own line of rums, now has an overproof demerara rum to market called "Hamilton 151 Overproof", distilled and aged on the banks the Demerara river. Mr. Hamilton understands the importance of Lemon Hart 151, and this rum is the real deal - as close as possible to Lemon Hart 151 (maybe slightly improved, depending on your taste). This is the primary (and only accurate) substitute for any recipe calling for "Lemon Hart 151". Ask your local liquor store for it by name.

If you cannot get a bottle of Lemon Hart 151 or Hamilton 151 Overproof, here are your available options. Note you'll get the proof and the color, and some of the body, but not the full flavor:

Plantation OFTD: An all-star tiki cocktail cabal helped Alexander Gabriel, master blender from Pierre Ferrand and Plantation Rum, develop this blend of rums from Guyana, Jamaica, and Barbados. Coming in at 138 proof, it's a shade below 151 but you won't notice it when you mix it into the old classics that call for Lemon Hart 151. A fine pick-up for your home bar.

For non-Lemon Hart 151 applications, there are some good overproof options. Please don't bother with Bacardi 151 (July 23,2017: Bacardi is no longer on the market), even as ignition fuel for flaming drinks. Rather than soaking a sugar cube or crouton in 151 prof rum, soak it in lemon extract. You'll get a much better flame.

Lost Spirits Cuban-Inspired 151 - this is a fantastic rum that will challenge what you expect from an overproof rum. While not a Lemon Hart 151 substitute, you can substitute it anyway in recipes that call for LH151 and get very good (just not identical) results.

Cruzan 151 - this is a good light Spanish-style overproof that I'd use in recipes that call for Bacardi 151.

Don Q 151 - similar to Cruzan 151.

Agricole rum (Rhum Agricole) Blanc

Rhum agricole is the designation given to the spirits made from sugar cane on the island of Martinique. The process for producing rhum agricole on Martinique is governed and defined by an AOC, the Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée. Ok, technically you can have a rhum from Martinique that does not adhere to the AOC and therefore cannot use that labeling. But the good ones are labeled with the AOC designation so for the conversation here I'll consider all agricole rhum from Martinique as adhering to the AOC. Agricole rhum from Martinique is made from pressed sugar cane juice rather than molasses, which imparts more of the soil/land into the spirit. This is the biggest distinction from other styles of rum. The "blanc" rhum agricole is un-aged, though it may have rested (n a vat) for a period of time before being bottled. This rum is your best bet for a 'ti punch.

Rhum agricole can be hard to find in chain liquor stores, but it's worth seeking out. In terms of substitution, the closest style would be the Barbancourt rhums from Haiti as they follow a similar French lineage as Martinique rhums and are also distilled from cane juice rather than molasses. It's not a straight substitution, but you can get some of the same characteristics from Barbancourt.

Agricole rum (Rhum Agricole) Vieux ("old", or aged)

Everything from the section previous applies, with the addition of aging in a barrel. After aging rhum agricole blanc in a barrel for 3 years, the AOC says it can be labeled "vieux", or "old". These are generally smoother than their blanc counterparts while still retaining the characteristics that define an agricole rum and they're golden in color. They're excellent paired with a Jamaican rum in a Trader Vic's Mai Tai and really shine in a classic recipe from Donn Beach, the 3 Dots and a Dash. They're also very nice sipping rums.

Similar to the note on agricole blanc: in terms of substitution, the closest style would be the Barbancourt rhums from Haiti as they follow a similar French lineage as Martinique rhums and are also distilled from cane juice rather than molasses. It's not a straight substitution, but you can get some of the same characteristics from Barbancourt.


Ron de Barrilito 3 Stars - Recipes

I love old, historic buildings and rum, so of course I had to make a point to visit Hacienda Santa Ana &mdash the home of Ron del Barrilito, one of the local Puerto Rican rum producers. Their rum is made and aged here, on the old family property, which used to be an old sugar hacienda. They have opened a visitors center and there are now tours and tastings of their delicious rum. Reserve your tour at their website .

Some History

The Fernández family had owned Hacienda Santa Ana in Bayamón since 1797. It used to be a sugar cane plantation and, like many sugar plantations back in the day, they made some rum for personal use.

In 1880, Pedro Fernández started selling his family’s rum under the name Ron del Barrilito (rum from the little barrel) &mdash named after the barrels they used to age the rum. Today, the company continues to make rum using the family’s same blending and aging practices.

Our Visit

All rum tours come with a tour of the historic buildings and methods used to make Ron Barrilto! This is called the Heritage Tour.

As you pull in the driveway, you will see the beautiful old hacienda house, with a large staircase. There looks like some old workers’ quarters, and right in the middle of the property are the ruins of an old windmill (dated 1827). You will also see the “factory” and storage area. You check in at the Visitors Center, get a cocktail and meet your guide. The tour will take you into the factory and storage area, and if you are lucky, you will see some of the workers doing their thing. We saw the barrel repair man, and also the crew hand-labeling hundreds of bottles of rum. It was pretty cool to see.

Your guide will show you around and explain their process.

They don’t actually distill rum here. They buy raw, distilled alcohol from local distilleries, and then work their magic to produce their unique rum.

They blend it (according to their decades-old family recipe), and then set it to age in charred sherry wine barrels. This is different than other rum producers in Puerto Rico &mdash all the others age their rum in charred whisky barrels, and then they blend the aged spirits.

The tour will take you into where they store/age the rum . You can go in there and see all the barrels stacked up and smell it- really neat!

At the end of the tour, you go back to the visitors center, where they have a beautiful bar set up with some very delicious cocktails to try. They also have a store where you can buy all their rums and other Ron Barrilito paraphernalia.

Ron del Barrilto produces three types of rum &mdash 2-Star, 3-star and 5-Star (the number of stars are on the label). The 2-Star gold rum is aged 3 years, while the 3-Star gold rum is a mixture of rums that are aged between 6 to 10 years. The new 5 star is well aged rum , some up to 35 years old, blended to perfection.

This is not a huge operation, but it is a true Puerto Rican rum, and a favorite of local Puerto Ricans.

Details

They are open Mon- Sat 9am – 6pm. (closed Sunday) Make sure to reserve a tour. The Heritage tour is about 30 mins long. Other Tours are available that include rum tasting or cocktail preparation.

The Heritage tour costs $25 and includes a cocktail! You must be 18 years old to drink the rum.

Remember you must visit on a formal tours. Reserve your tour at their website .

Most tours are in English, but they do offer Spanish tours at certain times- reserve the tour in the language you prefer.

From the San Juan area, take Route 22 west to exit 10. Then take Route 5 south. Continue on Route 5 until you see a small exit to the right that goes toward Route 28. Get off at that exit, but instead of turning left to get onto Route 28, continue straight through the stop sign. Hacienda Santa Ana / Ron del Barrilito is just on the right side, past the small paved lot on the corner. Look for their sign (pictured here). Drive in through the open gate and park.

We are in the process of updating the maps we use on our web site. While we're working on that, you can click on the GPS coordinates below to view the location on Google Maps .


Ron de Barrilito 3 Stars - Recipes

Ron del Barrilito 3 star. This is perhaps one of the most misunderstood and controversial “rums” in the rum world. On researching this rum, it seems history has been re-written time and time again with regards as to what exactly this rum really is.

A lot of the confusion is caused by “word of mouth” and people passing on information from brand ambassadors, fellow enthusiasts and on occasion the actual producers of Ron del Barrilito. If you try and research this rum you are left with the impression, this could be anything from the greatest rum ever, to a very average “spiced” rum. As with most things, the truth when such polar opposites exist is perhaps more somewhere around the centre of the argument!

At this point I am going to make a disclosure with regard this rum. Anything I write after this regarding its composition, could be complete rubbish. My tasting notes and the Hydrometer Test I conduct are the only parts of this review I will stand by. Anything else can (and will) be changed if someone can convince me I have got something wrong.

Ron del Barrilito 3 Star is not readily available here in the UK. It is easier to find in Europe but its easiest to find in the US. From what I can see it retails at around $30-35. Were it to come to the UK, I would probably expect to pay the best part of £45 for a bottle. Ron Del Barralito when it does appear tends to be in a US sized 75cl bottle. Rather than the standard metric 70cl UK/Europe bottle. It is bottled at 43% ABV.

It is understood to be a rum produced by Serralles (Don Q).However, more up to date information suggests the company behind Ron del Barrilito source their base rum now from Bacardi. Ron del Barrilito 3 star is a blend of column distilled rums aged up to 6 years. It is “blended” and aged in “seasoned sherry casks”. The hydrometer detects around 8g/L of additives – so this would suggest the “seasoned sherry casks” are not 100% clean when the rum is blended………

The brand have their own website. Upon entering this you are first hit with the fact that Ron del Barrilito is Puerto Rico’s Oldest Rum. It also notes the 3 star as being a blend of rums aged between 6 and 10 years old. As I said earlier researching this brand has proved very…..interesting/frustrating.

The website also states the following “Every single bottle of Ron del Barrilito holds premium rum that has been crafted by hand using the same methods since 1880. It’s always been made in very small batches. Absolutely no artificial ingredients or colorings are used. It’s aged to perfection in vintage american white oak sherry barrels.”

Ron del Barrilito is produced by the Fernandez family and they have been producing rum from the Hacienda Santa Ana. They state that both their “regular” rums, the 2 and 3 star are produced in small batches. Last year they released a very expensive 5 star version, which again proved quite controversial and provoked a lot of very differing opinions! Mostly due to the price point! You can read about the 5 star in more detail here. $750 per bottle though…..

Presentation wise Ron del Barrilito 3 Star comes in a standard bar style bottle with an old style “Cuban” kind of presentation. I quite like its vintage look and I would probably pull a bottle from the shelf if I was out shopping.

In the glass we have a dark brown spirit with an orange hue. Nosing Ron del Barrilito 3 star is a pleasant experience. It is a very “Cuban” style of rum with lots of tobacco, tar and some sweet milk chocolate notes.

Further nosing reveals some sweet sherry which become quite dominant on the nose. It’s a very fruity nose with lots of raisins and currants. There is a slightly peppery spice mingling alongside the sweet sherried notes.

It’s all quite nicely balanced and overall quite pleasant.

Sipped Ron del Barrilito is very smooth and very easy to sip. It has a mouthfeel which is perhaps a touch more oily than I would like and it has a confected air to it. It’s a pretty sweet rum. The tobacco and tar that were evident on the nose have been totally taken over by the sherried fruit sweetness. This does in many ways taste like an aged sherry rather than a rum.

The initial sweetness fade into a fairly short mid palate which has a little ginger and cinnamon. The lightness of the spirit means it quickly disappears and has a fairly short finish. Tobacco and smoke and a very quick fade.

I found this okay as a sipper, though for me it’s just too light. As a mixer it works nicely with cola making a very pleasant rum and cola or rather sherry and cola. If you are familiar with aged sherry such as Torres 10 Year Old you will find a lot of similarity with this rum. If you like a brandy and cola you will find comfort in this rum.

Overall it’s not a terrible experience and I can understand why it has so many fans. Unfortunately, it doesn’t really taste all that “rummy” to me and has a confected air to it and the sherry influence is just a little bit more than I would like. We aren’t in Dos Maderas territory here in terms of additives but its still quite a sweet spirit.

I’m pleased I have tried this rum. That said I wouldn’t break my back to try and get a bottle in the future.

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Review: Ron del Barrilito 3 Star

I’ve recently been interested more in rums made in the “Spanish” tradition (as opposed to those from islands formerly/currently under French or British rule). While Bacardi is the maybe the most well-known of this type, I wanted to get an idea of what a higher-end Puerto Rican rum might taste like. Some internet sleuthing led me to Ron del Barrilito, which is a family-run brand out of Puerto Rico operating at a much smaller scale than Bacardi or Don Q – their distillery is run by just 9 employees.

The Ron del Barrilito main product range consists of their 3 Star and 2 Star rums. They also offer 4 Star and 5 Star rums only at Hacienda Santa Ana, the tour facility at their distillery. The 4 Star appears to be a limited release you fill yourself at the facility, which is the kind of thing I’m a complete sucker for and will definitely do when I make it down to Puerto Rico some day. In addition, it looks like their tour offerings are pretty stacked.

My current reality has me stuck in Chicago, so Binny’s seemed like the next best thing. Since I was trying for the higher-end, I opted for the 3 Star, which is advertised as a good sipping rum and was listed in stock on the Binny’s website. It comes in a cardboard sleeve (similar to some single malt scotches), and I particularly like the bottle labeling. The one thing that surprised me was that it had a plastic screw top, which I didn’t expect at $40 for this bottle, though from what I understand Ron del Barrilito is significantly cheaper in Puerto Rico.

Okay, enough background. Let’s see how this rum actually tastes.

In the glass, I catch hints of honey, oak, vanilla, and a little caramel in the nose. There is a lot going on with this rum, and it’s relatively complex. There is just a hint of astringency, but it’s not distracting.

The mouthfeel is medium-bodied, and the honey, oak, and vanilla flavors follow through. There is a long finish, spicy with hints of tobacco. It’s very mellow and easy-drinking, and easily the best rum I’ve had from Puerto Rico so far. I ended up having another glass to sip after my initial taste test, and continued to be impressed. While I was enjoying my drink, I noticed a small typo on the back label of the bottle, “enjoy ir straight,” which (to me) is a nice reminder that this company isn’t a giant multi-national, but just a small group of people making very fine rum.

Overall, the 3 Star is great on its own (and much better than you’d find in a whiskey at this price) and would shine in a spirit-forward cocktail like a rum old fashioned. This is one I’m going to keep in stock on my shelf for a while, and I look forward to trying the rest of the Ron del Barrilito range.


Watch the video: Rum Tour u0026 Mixology Class. Ron del Barrilito in Puerto Rico! (October 2021).