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10 Awkward Food Moments on a First Dinner Date (Slideshow)

10 Awkward Food Moments on a First Dinner Date (Slideshow)

David Tutera dishes on the worst food blunders and how to survive them

Technically, this is not a "food mistake" but the way your date speaks to and treats your waiter is a great indicator of who they really are as a person.

Being Rude to the Waiter

Technically, this is not a "food mistake" but the way your date speaks to and treats your waiter is a great indicator of who they really are as a person.

Ordering For Your Date

It can be incredibly rude to order for someone without giving them fair warning that you're going to do so. If you take a date to your favorite restaurant and really want them to try the house specialty, suggest this idea at the beginning when the menus are first handed to you. If your date is game, go for it. And if the dish is a big hit, it will certainly come off as impressive and you'll be able to let them order for you on date two!

Forgetting the Reservation

Fess up as soon as you can! If you've already made it to the restaurant before realizing this, eat a piece of humble pie as an appetizer and make light of having to sit at the bar while you wait for your table. If you haven't yet picked your date up, go with Plan B! Head to the grocery store for some picnic staples and have a date night al fresco.

Fighting Over the Tab

It's not a bad idea for the initiator of the date (the one who said "will you go on a date with me?") to reach for the check first, guy or girl. But if the other person has serious objections to not splitting the check on the first date, just go Dutch! Nothing stops a date in its tracks like an awkward and unnecessary disagreement.

Spilling Your Drink

Don't get too wound up about it, at the end of the day it's not that big of a deal. Make a joke of it and be able to laugh at yourself for your flub. If you spill on your date, offer to get them some seltzer water to help clean it up.

Getting Food Stuck In Your Teeth

This is a pretty tough one to recover from! I would say abstinence is the best policy here. Avoid foods that have a tendency to get stuck in your teeth, such as raw broccoli or anything with seeds, so you won't have to worry about the problem to begin with. If something does get lodged in your chompers, DON'T try to remove it while you're at the table. Excuse yourself, and hope that you noticed before your date did. If they start to pick their teeth, offer them a toothpick. If they don't get the hint after that, it's probably time to go home anyway!

Not Knowing How to Eat Certain Foods

If your date is encouraging you to try something new and you're not 100% sure how to eat it, don't be afraid to ask them for help. If the sparks are already flying, it could be super romantic to have your date teach you the proper methods and feed you a piece!

Pronouncing the Dish Wrong

Tomato ortomahto? Just laugh it off! Your culinary blunder may end up becoming the first inside joke in your new relationship.

Your Date Slurps

Suck it up (no pun intended) for the remainder of the date. If it really grosses you out, don't plan to go on a second one with this person.

Your Date Picks a Bad Restaurant

Find two appetizers (or an appetizer and a salad) that are more appealing to you than the entrees themselves and make your meal out of that. Try to be as easy about it as possible so that you don't come off as picky. If there's absolutely nothing on the menu that you can force down, jokingly ask to try somewhere else. You can say something along the lines of "This place is too fancy for me tonight! Let's try that great new food truck, I hear they're parked just around the corner!" For date two, suggest a restaurant that appeals more to your own tastes, and hope your date will like it, too.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Blind date: ‘Awkward moment? The temperature gun check’

What were you hoping for?
A free meal, good company and that my picture wouldn’t show what my sister calls my weird half-smile.

First impressions?
Very easy to chat to. The conversation flowed.

What did you talk about?
Cat-sitting, running during lockdown, our career paths.

Any awkward moments?
Beaming “Oh, hi!” when I saw her, only to be recalled by a waitress who pressed a temperature gun against my temple as if I was being murdered in No Country For Old Men.

Good table manners?
Impeccable.

Best thing about Francine?
Her chat. We had lots in common.

Would you introduce her to your friends?
Definitely.

Describe Francine in three words?
Fun, warm and interesting.

What do you think she made of you?
Hopefully, a good guy to spend an evening with. At the very least, a competent Lorraine Kelly impersonator.

Did you go on somewhere?
No. Maybe if London wasn’t so quiet right now.

If it weren’t for social distancing, would you have kissed?
We had a goodbye peck on the cheek, but I think our connection was more friendly than anything.

If you could change one thing about the evening, what would it be?
I’d have worn a more sensible T-shirt.

Marks out of 10?
8.

Would you meet again?
Sure.

Want to be in Blind date?

Blind date is Guardian Weekend magazine’s dating column: every week, two strangers are paired up for dinner and drinks, and then spill the beans to us, answering a set of questions. This runs, with a photograph we take of each dater before the date, in Guardian Weekend magazine (in the UK) and online at theguardian.com every Saturday. It’s been running since 2009 – you can read all about how we put it together here.

What questions will I be asked?
We ask about age, location, occupation, hobbies, interests and the type of person you are looking to meet. If you do not think these questions cover everything you would like to know, tell us what’s on your mind.

Can I choose who I match with?
No, it’s a blind date! But we do ask you a bit about your interests, preferences, etc – the more you tell us, the better the match is likely to be.

Can I pick the photograph?
No, but don't worry: we'll choose the nicest ones.

What personal details will appear?
Your first name, job and age.

How should I answer?
Honestly but respectfully. Be mindful of how it will read to your date, and that Blind date reaches a large audience, in print and online.

Will I see the other person’s answers?
No. We may edit yours and theirs for a range of reasons, including length, and we may ask you for more details.

Will you find me The One?
We’ll try! Marriage! Babies!

Can I do it in my home town?
Only if it’s in the UK. Many of our applicants live in London, but we would love to hear from people living elsewhere.


Watch the video: Λαζόπουλος: Δεν κινδυνεύω από τον ανεμβολίαστο (December 2021).