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Best Hearts of Palm Recipes

Best Hearts of Palm Recipes

Hearts of Palm Shopping Tips

Look for vegetables that are firm and bright in color – avoid those that are wilted or have wrinkled skins, which are signs of age.

Hearts of Palm Cooking Tips

Different vegetables have different cooking times – cook each type separately and then combine.


The Best Palmini Low Carb Pasta Recipes

If you’re a member of the 131 Method, you have access to our 700+ recipe database. In it, you’ll find several recipes using shirataki noodles (AKA Miracle Noodles). Practically calorie, fat and carb-free, these noodles are a go-to pasta substitute for people who eat low-carb. They do have some limitations, however. Even though we love them, the texture is much better for Asian cuisine versus Italian, and some people struggle to like the texture at all.

Our new fun find is by a brand called Palmini. This pasta comes from hearts of palm. “Palmini is a low carb pasta substitute, made completely out of a natural plant known as Hearts of Palm. When this plant is cut and cooked in the proper way, its resemblance to regular pasta is remarkable. Not only does it look like pasta, but it can also taste like pasta!” So, we went out and found the best low carb pasta recipes made with this yummy new noodle. We found cans of it at our local health food store (Sprouts), but you can also order it online from them and on Amazon. And while we love us some zucchini noodles, variety is the spice of life, right?! Zucchini noodles sometimes release liquid into dishes, and these Palmini noodles don’t!

Palmini Highlights

  • Featured on Shark Tank and in various publications, this new type of pasta is getting lots of buzz
  • Gluten-free
  • Only 4 grams of carbs per serving
  • Non-GMO
  • Sugar-free
  • Only 20 calories per serving
  • High in fiber and almost 90% water
  • Pre-cooked for easy preparation
  • Vegan
  • Sustainably sourced

What is Palmini?

This pasta contains only one ingredients: hearts of palm, the edible inner core of a palm tree. So, it’s a vegetable high in fiber and water. They cook it and cut it to resemble pasta. Since it’s fully cooked, you can eat it straight from the can or pouch, however, there are tricks to making it taste more like regular pasta. But you decide on how to eat it! Cold, hot, soaked and prepared…the options are endless.

One trick we found is to rinse the noodles, then soak in nondairy milk for 20 minutes, which removes any “heart of palm” flavor. Rinse again, and then use for cooking.

The Best Low Carb Pasta Recipes Using Palmini

Palmini with Creamy Butternut Squash

Our first recipe comes from the Palmini site. We gravitated towards this vegan dish because of its use of butternut squash in the sauce. The creamy and natural sweetness from this gourd is a favorite with us in general, and pairs beautifully with their neutral pasta. It’s also a great way to sneak in more veggies! Palmini with Creamy Butternut Squash

Tuna Noodle Casserole

Remember these types of casseroles from when you were a kid?! Well, this one gets a low-carb update, and it’s creamy, keto-friendly, and wildly delicious. Warm and comforting, it contains all the ingredients you know and love from this classic. Head over to Debbie Makes Low Carb Delicious for the mouthwatering recipe. (If you need it dairy-free, opt for butter flavored coconut oil instead of ghee, coconut milk instead of cream, and vegan cheese in place of the Parmesan). Tuna Palmini Noodle Casserole

Super Greens Lemon Pesto Pasta

This recipe is as simple as soaking your Palmini noodles in some nondairy milk for a bit, rinsing, warming and tossing with our outrageously delicious vegan pesto. Packed with basil, spinach, arugula, lemon and pistachios, this pesto is definitely “extra!” Super Greens Lemon Pesto

Low Carb Palmini Pasta with Truffle Cream Sauce

This vegan dish comes together in a few minutes and tastes like a savory, creamy flavor explosion. But don’t worry! If you want to make it without truffles, go right ahead. We included an option for you in the recipe:) Pasta with Truffle Cream Sauce Recipe

Palmini Lasagna

Who can hearty layers of meat, marinara, mushrooms and melty cheese?! We fell head over heels for this clean lasagna recipe brought to you by Healthy with Nedi. She uses high quality ingredients, just like us. From grass-finished beef to one of our favorite vegan cheeses, this recipe gets an A+. Palmini Lasagna


Hearts of Palm: A Brief History

Firstly, I recognize that there are people who may not know what hearts of palm are. This is understandable, as it’s an unusual ingredient, not something most of us encounter on a day-to-day basis. And by name or unassuming appearance alone, it doesn’t really excite or entice one to salivate and daydream about it in the same way that other foods can.

For me, my introduction to hearts of palm arrived mostly by happenstance. I had tried a month or two of the plant-based meal delivery service, Purple Carrot. The company delivers a menu and pre-made meal plan, as well as all the fresh produce you need, in this gigantor container right to your front door. One of the meals (I forget what it was exactly) featured hearts of palm!

Out of the can, hearts of palm look like they belong in a library more than in a kitchen they appear to be little beige scrolls, briny and fleshy and soft. My first thoughts were, “how do you eat these?” and more importantly, “who would want to?!”

But little did I know that this simple introduction would inspire me to work with them and transform into incredibly delicious food later on, like this hearts of palm ceviche recipe.

After some experimentation, I realized what a versatile ingredient these little beige scrolls were: they could be battered, fried, baked, marinated, and eaten raw, and yet whatever their form, they would still taste delicious. Better yet, when prepared properly, they have this very delicate white fish-like texture that almost melts in your mouth as a creamy thread of sheer bliss.

Needless to say, after that I was hooked. It’s one of my favorite ingredients, and I use it quite often as a way of emulating certain seafoods, and/or adding a briny, creamy element to any dish.

If you want to discover more recipes than just this vegan hearts of palm ceviche, check out my category, Everything Hearts of Palm , to uncover other amazing recipes for this incredible, indelibly delicious ingredient.


How Do I Use Hearts of Palm?

They can be used right from the jar or can, sliced or diced and added in vegetable or grain salads (like this Bright, Herby Three Bean Salad or this Hearts of Palm Salad), or wrapped with a piece of prosciutto or ham and eaten as a snack or appetizer.

They can also be used in cooked dishes, like stir-fries, or this Brazilian Casserole of Shrimp and Hearts of Palm (Camarões com Palmito).

Hearts of palm also have similarity to the texture of crab or lobster meat, and I have used them chopped in place of those shellfish in different recipes, like crab cakes (but with hearts of palm) or hot dips. They are an interesting substitute if you are looking to make a dish vegetarian or vegan. You could use hearts of palm instead of artichokes in this hot cheesy dip as well (vegetarian, but not vegan!).


A Quick Aioli

Aioli, or at least a vegan aioli, is something that anyone could whip up in less than 5 minutes. This kale aioli is no different, except you will need a food processor in order to break down the kale. If you don’t have a food processor, leave the kale out and whip it with a whisk by hand.

All you have to do is combine the aioli ingredients (vegan mayo, lemon juice & zest, garlic, capers, salt, kale, fresh dill) together and blend until smooth.

In this vegan fish and chips recipe, this tangy aioli is a great mock tartar sauce that pairs excellently well with the vegan fish and chips, the crunchy and crispy hearts of palm cutlets a perfect vessel for dipping into this beautiful chartreuse mayo mixture.

“The fish in the creek said nothing. Fish never do. Few people know what fish think about injustice, or anything else.”


Related Video

This is one of my favorite salads. Make it all the time! I add more lemon juice.

Loved this! Used ground coriander and fresh cilantro in the dressing and spinach rather than Boston and served it with grilled chicken. Agree with some other reviews, less avocado, more hearts of palm. Will definitely make again but might add some toasted pecans for some crunch.

This was a great salad, used one heaping teaspoon of ground coriander instead of fresh, reduced avocado to 3 and 1 large head of boston lettuce. Served 6 with plenty leftover. I made the vinaigrette in jar, was fine and didn't have to drag out/clean blender. Was a nice, interesting change-up on the salad!

I absolutely loved this salad, but next time I think I'll add more hearts of palm and lessen the avocado to make the textures a little more even. That cilantro vinaigrette was lip-smacking great!

This was absolutely excellent. I made it as written without changes. A great mix of flavors and beyond my expectations. I will be making it again many times.

I will definitely make this again. The salad dressing is absolutely gorgeous and it really complements the texture and flavours of the salad ingredients. I have always found hearts of palm a bit mysterious and wondered what you could do with them but I will be adding them to my shopping list regularly now.

This had all the 'stuff' that I like but it didn't come together as much as the reviews raved. For the vinaigrette it says 1/4 cup coriander, is that chopped, minced, packed? If it is only 1/4 cup it is not enough flavor for the dressing. If it is minced it is too much and makes the dressing clumpy and difficult to distribute. I also think it needs less lettuce and more hearts of palm.

This salad is unbelievable. Excellent flavor, it looks nice, it smells good, its an all-around winner. Can't wait to have it again. Might try adding a handful of halved cherry tomatoes next time, but not because the salad is lacking, just because I add tomatoes to everything. DELICIOUS!

Love the flavor. I used onlu one avocado and added fresh tomato wedges. Great color.

excellent salad! light and refreshing! a wonderful dressing too! I didn't have lettuce on hand so I used a salad of mixed greens..and it was perfect! so glad I found this recipe..I will make this sald many, many more times!

I made this on News years Eve for a special dinner and have been making it on a regular basis ever since, awesome!

Délicieux! I made this to accompany Rebecca's jerk chicken, rice and black bean entrée. It was a hit. I used basil in lieu of coriander and iceberg replaced the boston lettuce which made a nice crisp contrast to the avocado and heart of palms. I served it on a platter. Looked smashing. The hearts of palm went over well as not too many people are familiar with this particular vegetable. A definite keeper.

Great recipe for BBQs. I add mandarin oranges.

This was really fabulous. The only change from the recipe I made was to use basil instead of cilantro (accidentally grabbed flat leaf parsley instead of cilantro at the store) and a walla walla sweet onion intead of red onion. I considered adding a colorful vegetable but in the end really liked the green presentation. This accompanied a jerk chicken meal and was very well received by our guests.

I have been looking for recipes that will help introduce my 3 tear old granddaughter to the delights of the Caribbean which is part of her birth heritage. She gobbled it up :) Her step grandfather who despises cilantro ate the salad (and dressing) with not a peep what with him being so busy having seconds). Luverly and refreshing. I used more garlic ( a large clove) added 1/8 cup orange juice and a splash o sherry vinegar to the lemon juice. This changed the proportion needed for the olive oil of course but I just eyeballed it keeping the 2:1 ratio in mind. Like, a cook from brooklyn, I found pureeing the cilantro w/o liquid difficult thus was born the idea of adding OJ. Much simpler to emulsify. Iɽ venture to say that either a food processor, blender or handstick (as I used) will give much the same results. For colour and since it was languishing in the fridge, I added some pequillo peppers cut in strips. I imagine roasted peppers would work well too. A definite keeper.


WTF is Heart of Palm Pasta and Why Should You Try It?

While zoodles (zucchini noodles) enjoy their heyday as a nutritious way to substitute veggies for traditional flour pasta, vegetable lovers, vegans, and Paleo diet followers will be excited to hear there’s a new noodle in town, and it’s made — of all things — from palm trees.

Hearts of palm, which in their raw form look like un-fried, fat mozzarella sticks, are harvested from the inner core and growing buds of certain palm trees. These 100-percent edible cores are firm (like linguini noodles) and hyper nutritious. When cut and cooked the right way, it’s hard to tell you’re not eating pasta. Better still, the flavor is reminiscent of an artichoke, which is also great for your pasta plate.

Only a handful of companies have begun canning hearts of palm noodles for us to substitute in our spaghetti, lasagna, and stroganoff. Brazilian-based Harvest Palm is one, which now offers palm tree pasta to U.S. consumers after turning on a pair of traveling American brothers that went crazy over the taste and health benefits. Another is Palmini, which brought its pasta substitute to the investors on Shark Tank and accepted a $300,000 offer from Lori Greiner. Trader Joe’s also makes Trader Joe’s Heart of Palm Medallions.

Alfribeiro/Getty Images

So what’s all the hubbub about then, if not many people are producing them?

Hearts of palm pasta is only 15-20 calories per 75 gram serving (compare that to a cup of sauce-less penne, which has around 200 calories). This is because more than 90 percent of the vegetable is water, and it’s packed with fiber, making it a nearly calorie-free yet filling meal. To put this in perspective, it would only take two minutes of running to burn off a serving.

Counting aside, hearts of palm packs 4 grams of carbs per serving, is gluten-free, non-GMO, and contains zero sugar. You’ll also get a zing of potassium (one serving is equivalent to 10 percent of your daily recommended intake), and a boost of vitamin C, vitamin B6, calcium, magnesium, protein, and zinc (stellar for quick healing and aiding digestion.) Plus, it’s low in cholesterol.

Palmini/Facebook

The only “downside” is that one serving contains 26 percent of your daily recommended sodium intake. Ordinary pasta doesn’t come remotely close to that. However, hearts of palm is still notorious for being a health food, according to SELFNutritionData.

Now to the important question: How much does it actually taste like pasta? How much does any vegetable substitute taste like its real gluten inspiration?

The texture and appearance of palm tree pasta is much closer than other veggie spiral noodles like zucchini, beets, and sweet potatoes, however hearts of palm can have a strong smell. The simple fix: rinse very well and let the palm sit in your choice of milk for 15-30 minutes. Rinse again and you’ll find that the odor is diffused. (You can thank Palmini for this tip.)

Hearts of palm noodles also work in other noodle-based dishes (not just Italian!) like Pad Thai. For a more traditional recipe, try this Palmini and Homemade Pesto dish. One bonus of using hearts of palm instead of noodles is you won’t have to worry about limp, too-soft noodles if they’re cooked too long. All you need to do is warm up the canned palm and voila!


The Perfect Pantry®

Guest post by Peter in Brazil, chef and co-owner of Pousada do Capão.

For several months I’ve been meaning to write about hearts of palm, so Lydia’s recent visit to our inn provided the perfect opportunity to kill three birds with one stone: I could cook with her test the recipe for my hearts of palm, shrimp, and requeijão pizza and photograph the results.

In my Boston and Rhode Island pantries, a can of hearts of palm was what Lydia would classify as a “pantry special” -- not a staple, but something purchased for curiosity’s sake, on impulse, or for a particular recipe.

Here in my Brazilian pantry, I always keep a jar or a can or two on hand. While they don’t hold a candle to fresh hearts of palm, in a pinch they add texture to a salad or a jardinière, depth and crunch to empadinha filling, body to a soufflé, or interest to a pizza, and they are a pretty decent substitute for artichoke hearts, which are completely unknown in these parts.

Heart of palm is the crunchy, creamy, ivory-colored inner core of the terminal leaf bud of any of up to twenty species of palm trees. It is an ancient food, eaten for centuries by indigenous populations of the tropics.

There is a down side, though: harvesting the heart of single-trunk palms (which of course are the most delicious) kills the tree. With the heart removed, the tree will not regenerate. This wasn’t such a problem until hearts of palm became a gourmet commodity (no surprise that the world’s largest importer of palmitos is France).

Native populations in Central and South America made use of the whole plant –- leaves, bark, wood, nuts, oil, as well as the delicious heart –- and their consumption was in balance with nature’s bounty. But exploitation and irresponsible harvesting of wild palms, without concern for sustainability, have taken their toll on many of South America’s once vast native palm stands.

Efforts to cultivate palms have had some success, and environmental laws are in place to protect the endangered wild palms, but as with so many things, the forbidden fruits are the best!

Hearts of palm, shrimp and requeijão pizza

This combination of ingredients is delicious! Use your favorite homemade or store-bought pizza dough to make this 14-inch round, freeform, or 9x13-inch rectangular white pizza. Requeijão cremoso is a type of goopy, Brazilian-style cream cheese usually sold in glasses or plastic cups in the dairy case of many supermarkets, especially in neighborhoods with Portuguese-speaking residents. (I always found it at Seabra Markets in Rhode Island and Massachusetts.) In a pinch, you can substitute four ounces of cream cheese melted over very low heat with four ounces of grated Muenster, stirring until smooth. This can be made ahead and stored in the refrigerator until ready to use. Serves 6.

Ingredients

1 batch of pizza dough, rolled out to desired shape and size
1 14-oz can or jar of hearts of palm, cut into rounds or 1/4-inch dice
1 lb large (26-30 size) shrimp, shelled, sautéed in olive oil until pink, and sliced in half lengthwise
1 jar of requeijão cremoso (approximately 8 oz), or softened cream cheese
1/2 cup sliced scallion greens
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella
1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
Fresh ground black pepper to taste

Directions

Prebake the crust on a cookie sheet or pizza stone until just beginning to brown, 10 minutes or more. Remove from oven, flip over so that the bottom side is now on top, and spread the requeijão cremoso all over the crust (it will melt and be runny), leaving a 1/2” border around the outside edges. Sprinkle with fresh ground black pepper. Scatter hearts of palm pieces evenly over the requeijão, then scatter the shrimp on top, filling in the spaces. Finally, scatter the scallion greens and shredded cheeses evenly over the pizza.

Bake until the crust is fully cooked and the cheeses are bubbly and beginning to take on a little color, approximately 15-20 minutes. Then, be patient. I hate it when I burn the roof of my mouth, but I always do with pizza fresh from the oven. Let it cool a bit, and serve with beer or a cold, light white wine.


Yes, These 20 Mexican Recipes *Happen* To Be Vegan

Whether you&rsquore looking to eat more plants or more Mexican food, you&rsquore in luck. Despite the stereotype that the cuisine's "classics" all involve meat, eating vegan and eating Mexican food can coexist quite beautifully.

According to Krista Linares, RDN, founder and owner of Nutrition con Sabor, &ldquoTraditional Mexican food is actually quite vegan-friendly,&rdquo she says, adding that most dishes contain hearty and satisfying vegan staples like beans, seeds, corn, and squash, with plenty of their flavor derived from vegan-friendly acidic sources like lime and tomato salsa. &ldquoI encourage people to emphasize these ingredients for a meal that is vegan but also feels like a truly Mexican meal,&rdquo she says.

But how does one simply&hellipditch the animal products? What&rsquos an enchilada not doused in sour cream, a ceviche not loaded with shrimp, or a taco free of pastor? Linares recommends not thinking about, say, visually replicating the meal, but thinking about what needs a certain ingredient might meet. &ldquoFor example, in Mexican food, cheese usually adds a creamy, cooling element, so avocado might be a good replacement because it has these same qualities,&rdquo she says.

Plant-based meat alternatives are certainly an option worth pursuing (beware of sky-high sodium content, however). But Linares says there are plenty of whole food toppings and fillings to add to your tacos and tamales like rajas (strips of roasted poblano pepper), mushrooms, and potato.

If you need even more reasons to ditch the meat next time you&rsquore cooking Mexican, Linares says opting for vegan versions of your favorite dishes provides a great source of fiber. Plus, that fiber promotes satiety between meals and prevents overeating. High-fiber diets are also great for your digestive health, and are even associated with a lower risk of chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes. Salud to that!

And without further ado, here are the top 20 vegan Mexican dishes to try for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even a few sweet treats.


10 Things to Do with Jarred, Marinated Artichokes

One of the most fascinating things about poking around people's pantries (oh, like you don't do that. ) is finding those go-to ingredients they always have around, the ones you would never think to keep on hand but are as essential to them as olive oil. For restaurant and drinks editor Andrew Knowlton, it's brown cheese (his wife is Norwegian, okay?) for Tertulia chef Seamus Mullen, it's sherry vinegar for bonappetit.com editor Matt Gross, it's dried chiles of all kinds.

Enter our collectively felt gem of a pantry good: marinated artichokes. We're talking about either jarred artichokes or the ones you find at your supermarket's salad bar, not canned ones. The jarred stuff is almost always marinated and, thus, flavorful canned artichokes are flavorless and soggy. So go for glass. And then do this with them:


Vegan Crab Cakes Recipe (Palm Hearts and Artichoke)

These vegan Maine Artichoke Crab Cakes are super easy and quick to prepare and you will have them ready on the table in a few minutes.

They taste incredibly delicious, crispy, juicy on the inside, and have a great texture. They are also gluten-free, nut-free, oil-free and whole food plant based.

You can serve these crab cakes as a starter, side dish or main course.

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We prepare these vegan crab cakes from chickpeas, palm hearts and artichokes. Thanks to the spices like Old Bay spice seasoning, these crab cakes don’t just have a great taste, they also have the perfect consistency thanks to the shredded palm hearts.

These vegan crab cakes are made entirely without crabs. With this plant-based version made from wholesome ingredients, you won't miss the traditional ones.

They're so delicious that you could just eat them as a snack. At least that's what we did. Dipped in rémoulade (tartar) sauce, these vegan crab cakes make a great party meal.

As for the spices, I stuck to traditional recipes that included parsley, Old Bay Seasoning. We use kelp powder and dill to create the fishy taste and are what make these meatless crab cakes so incredibly delicious.