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Recipe of the Day: Morandi's Grilled Pizza-Style Focaccia

Recipe of the Day: Morandi's Grilled Pizza-Style Focaccia

Whip up a restaurant-worthy grilled dish

Jacqui Wedewer/The Daily Meal

Make dinner at home feel like a true dining experience with this incredible grilled pizza-style focaccia recipe. Topped with arugula, proscuitto and parmesan cheese, this pizza is a nice, light appetizer to serve at a backyard barbecue or dinner with the family.

Food From Around the World That You Can Make at Home

This recipe comes to us from New York City Italian hotspot Morandi — known for its old-world authentic cuisine. The focaccia pairs nicely with a variety of toppings and can be made in less than one hour.

To make the dish you'll need pizza dough, olive oil, cheese, proscuitto and arugula. After rolling out the dough for your crust, grill it on medium heat for five minutes or until it's golden brown. Then flip to the other side and grill for another four minutes. After the crust is grilled and the cheese is spread, feel free to add on the rest of your cold toppings.

In just 25 minutes, you'll have a New York City pizza made from the comfort of your own home. After giving this a whirl, check out more of our pizza and pizza dough recipes perfect for weeknight dinners.

Morandi's Grilled Pizza-Style Focaccia

Ingredients

10 ounces pizza dough

4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 cup Stracchino cheese

1/4 pound proscuitto

1 cup arugula

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

Directions

Lightly brush pizza dough with 2 tbsp olive oil. Press and roll out the dough into a long, flat shape about 1/2 inch thick, 5 inches wide and 14 inches long.

Place on the grill perpendicular to the grill grates. Grill on medium heat for 4-5 minutes, until the bottom is light golden brown and dark grill marks appear. Flip to the other side and grill for another 3-4 minutes until both sides are a light golden brown color.

Transfer to a sheet pan and spread the Stracchino cheese over the dough. Place the pan in the oven and broil for 4-5 minutes, until cheese has melted.

Top with the proscuitto and arugula. Sprinkle parmesan over it and lightly drizzle on the rest of the olive oil.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Try Chef John&aposs recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza and watch the video below for step-by-step directions.

It's All in the Pan

A signature characteristic of Detroit-style pizza is its squared shape and crispy edged crust. So, in this case the pan is just as important as the other ingredients. The original pizzas were made in thick blue steel pans that were originally manufactured to store auto parts. Today, the same anodized steel style pan is used, sans the auto parts. A brand to check out at home is made by LloydsPans, which is the brand of pan Chef John uses in his recipe for Detroit-Style Pizza. (Yes, it&aposs a rectangular pan, but the pizza is called "square." That&aposs not confusing at all.)

The Dough and Crust

When it comes to making the dough, you&aposll want to use bread flour to achieve that airy, focaccia-like texture. You&aposll actually proof the dough in the pan you are cooking in, which makes it easier (at least for cleanup purposes).

As for the crust, it&aposs one of the most important parts of this style of pizza. To achieve that crispy crust, you want to make sure that you have a well-greased pan. You&aposll want to take that pizza out of the pan to cool as soon as you can, so the crust stays crisp and doesn&apost get soggy. Another key to the crust is the way the cheese melds with it. Note that the cheese is placed all the way to the edges to achieve those coveted golden-brown cheesy crust corners.

The Cheese

The cheese is a key element of the pizza as well. True Detroit-style pizza uses brick cheese and mozzarella. Brick cheese is ideal for its high fat content but can be hard to find outside of the Midwest. Chef John uses a combination of Monterey Jack and Cheddar cheese, and cuts the cheese into cubes to spread across the pizza. And unlike other pizzas, in this one the cheese goes BEFORE the sauce.

The Sauce

There are a number of different ways to make the sauce — Chef John uses a jar of prepared marinara sauce that he amps up with dried oregano, red pepper flakes, and garlic powder. (You could also make your own marinara.) Sauce is used more sparingly on this type of pizza, think drizzle or dollop instead of spreading it all over. You&aposll want to put it on top of the cheese either before or after you cook it (depending on your school of thought).

The Toppings

Toppings are not necessary but if you want to add them, pepperoni is the classic choice. Sometimes the toppings go under the cheese but many times you&aposll see these little toasty cups of pepperoni created when you place pepperoni slices on top of the sauce instead of underneath with the cheese.

One More Piece of Advice

To get the best crusts, bake your pizza on a pizza stone. Also, don&apost forget to preheat your oven before putting your pizza in. It makes all the difference.


Watch the video: Italian Grandma Makes Pizza and Pizza Sauce (October 2021).