Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Maple Syrup Is Much Healthier Than You Thought (With 5 Amazing Maple Recipes)

Maple Syrup Is Much Healthier Than You Thought (With 5 Amazing Maple Recipes)

We thought we knew everything. We thought that maple syrup and pancakes went hand-in-hand and that (even though pancakes are enjoyed around the world) maple syrup was a healthy eating death sentence. Oh, how we couldn’t have been more wrong.

Click here to see Things You Didn’t Know About Maple Syrup.

Maple syrup is healthy, and we’re hoping to justify your maple syrup addiction over the course of the next few sentences. Like honey, maple syrup is a natural source of gooey sweetness, and it's a viable, affordable sweetening option in the face of recent sugar taxes.

It’s full of antioxidants, ranks low on the glycemic index, and is rich in zinc, manganese, calcium, and potassium. Additionally, a recent study by the American Chemical Society showed that there are key ingredients in maple syrup that may help to protect our brains against Alzheimer’s disease (or prolong the lifespan of those who already suffer from the disease). Is your mind blown yet?

Of course we’re talking about pure, real maple syrup here. Steer clear of that crap that has corn syrup, artificial flavors, and other synthesized, unnatural ingredients. The real stuff is so unbelievably good that it can even hydrate you. Companies like DRINKmaple swear by it:

“DRINKmaple is the pure, refreshing water collected from Vermont maple trees in the spring. It is naturally hydrating, with just a hint of maple, and exploding with nutrients.”

Along with DRINKmaple, Omni Hotels & Resorts, ranked “Highest in Guest Satisfaction Among Upper Upscale Hotel Chains” by J.D. Power’s 2015 North America Hotel Guest Satisfaction Index Study, is at the forefront of the inevitable real maple trend.

Omni Hotels & Resorts is going to be all about maple this summer. It is creating an entire menu dedicated to dishes and cocktails featuring real maple syrup, which will be available at properties nation-wide. We have four great recipes from Executive Chefs Daven Wardynski and Andre Natera of Omni Hotels & Resorts as well as a cocktail recipe from Omni’s Brand Mixologist, Kim Haasarud. Let’s start there.

More and more we hear how bad high-fructose corn syrup and sugar are. Natural sweeteners like maple are fantastic alternatives as they provide the same sweetness when mixed with other ingredients. Take cocktails for example, simple syrup is used in almost all of them. Why not replace the simple syrup with maple, making it more natural and healthier in the process? That’s exactly what Kim Haasarud has done with this deliciously sweet twist on the greyhound, the Double Grapefruit Greyhound Cocktail.

Click here for the Double Grapefruit Greyhound cocktail recipe.

Looking for a sweet and spicy treat to bring to your neighbor’s backyard BBQ? Try making up a big batch of delicious, nutritious Pineapple Maple Salsa.

Click here for the Pineapple Maple Salsa recipe.

Not a pineapple person? How about bacon? Everyone loves bacon (we’re pretty sure that vegans, although they won’t ever admit it, are even tempted by bacon), and this Maple-Bacon Jam recipe is a delicious way to enjoy it.

Click here for the Maple-Bacon Jam recipe.

Roughly 50 percent of your son’s football team is sleeping in your basement this weekend. How will you feed them? Simple: Make up a giant batch of Savory Granola, put it in a trough, and let the boys at it.

Click here for the Savory Granola recipe.

If you’re looking to incorporate maple syrup into an entrée, fish is the way to go. A healthy, wild-caught slab of Alaskan salmon can undergo a culinary world tour when mixed with the Indian spice staple cardamom and a bit of authentic, pure, dark maple syrup from Canada. Here’s how to do it:

Click here for the Cardamom Maple Salmon recipe.

The accompanying slideshow is provided by The Daily Meal special contributor Emily Alford.


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?


Pure Maple Butter (also known as maple cream or the best spread on earth!)

You know when someone asks what you’d want to eat for your last meal? I never know what the heck to say. Umm, everything?! There are really so many foods I adore, such as this maple butter. To be honest, I’d love nothing more than a huge vat of maple butter on my death bed. Ok, and maybe some homemade almond milk to wash it down. I’d kindly ask someone to feed it to me with a big wooden spoon and I wouldn’t even worry about ruining my appetite or splitting my pants. What a glorious way to kick the bucket.

I’ve wanted to make maple butter since I had my first visit to a maple farm as a little girl. They sent us home with maple leaf candy (the start of a lifelong obsession) and I’d watch in awe with my classmates as the adults showed us huge pots of boiling syrup in the chilly Canadian outdoors. The best part was when they’d throw syrup onto the snow and it turned into big chunks of maple candy for us to eat. Us kids, of course, thought that was magic. Even though I was very young, this experience instilled a warm curiosity about food from nature and an interest in making things from scratch.

In case some of you aren’t familiar, maple butter (or maple cream) is pure maple syrup that has been boiled to a certain temperature, left to decrease in temperature, and then whipped/stirred like crazy for a good 30-35 minutes. This technique is hard-freaking-work, but I certainly don’t regret making it. I was thankful though that Eric helped me with the stirring. Every 5 minutes we’d switch so one person could rest and watch the other moan and complain about how long it was taking. Ok, ok, it was more like a 7 minute to 3 minute split, but who’s counting?

Twenty-five minutes into the 35-minute marathon stirring session, self-doubt crept in. I was sure that it wasn’t brought to the right temperature or we didn’t use the right grade of maple syrup.

Eric, as always, shows me why I shouldn’t give up so easily. Not just with cooking, but with everything in life.

“Oh it will work, keep the faith.”

Right before my eyes, the shiny amber candy turned into a beautiful tan matte butter. It was the most rewarding, magical thing.

And then I got to lick the wooden spoon! And then scrape the pot! Suddenly, I forgot all about my tired, weary arms. I could now climb mountains.

Then we had it on muffins. Needless to say, it’s “hidden” in the back of the fridge where I will obviously discover it multiple times per day just by coincidence. Did I mention it’s good on oatmeal? And by good on oatmeal I mean good on everything.

Anyway, there’s no need for me to re-write the recipe today. I’m not reinventing the wheel, just using a technique that has been explained wonderfully elsewhere. America’s Test Kitchen has a video and it helped me a lot.

The only thing I would add to their directions is to test your candy thermometre before you start. Just bring a pot of water to a boil and make sure that your thermometre reads about 212 F (the boiling point of water). Once you know it’s working properly, you can proceed with confidence. Oh and it’s also worth mentioning that you shouldn’t have any kids or pets around when making this. The syrup is extremely hot and dangerous so be careful. My last tip is to increase the heat fairly gradually from the start. I, of course, cranked the burner heat to MAX and it nearly boiled over sending me into a panicked frenzy (as if I wasn’t already). I’m sure the next time will go much more smoothly now that I know what to expect.

One more thing. Sketchie says hi. ….and stop bugging me when I sleep.

Have you ever tried maple butter before or made any type of candy at home?