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Boston Restaurants Fight Against Child Hunger On Massachusetts Restaurant Day

Boston Restaurants Fight Against Child Hunger On Massachusetts Restaurant Day

Chef Andy Husbands led an event to support No Kid Hungry

Delicious Burgers from chef Andy Husbands of Tremont 647.

One in five children go hungry every day. Andy Husbands of Tremont 647 is one such leader who has worked tirelessly over the past 19 years to create Massachusetts restaurant day benefiting No Kid Hungry.

This year, April 11th marked a very special MA restaurant day. For the first time ever, the effort expanded beyond chef Andy’s restaurant to include 25 chefs across 5 cities. This one night only event gives each chef the chance to present a special 5 course menu, of which all of the proceeds are donated to No Kid Hungry’s Nutrition Education Program.

I had the opportunity to ask Chef Andy a few questions about this charitable event:

The Daily Meal: How did you initially become the leader of MA restaurant day?
Chef Andy: I have always been dedicated to ending child hunger. Moreover, working with No Kid Hungry happened organically and we have been fortunate to be able to grow this event into what it is today!

What is your most memorable take away from hosting this event at Tremont 647?
I think seeing my staff’s passion and dedication to the cause and seeing them donate their own time to stop child hunger is truly inspiring.

Which other restaurants and chefs participated?
Tremont 647, One Eleven Chop House, Quarterdeck, Cobblestones of Lowell, and East Bay Grille.

What do you see as the future trajectory of this fundraiser? Do you think it will continue to grow?
I believe it will continue to grow – Governor Baker just issued a citation in support of April 11th as “Massachusetts Restaurant Day for No Kid Hungry.” With the recognition throughout the community, we look forward to spreading the word and stopping child hunger!

With efforts like this, child hunger is addressed head on. Few things are better thanjoying a meal of which its proceeds go towards a leading organization combatting child hunger? Big thanks to chef Andy and his colleagues for allowing this initiative to grow in such a tremendous way.

For more Boston dining and restaurant news, click here.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


App Offers Discounts At Restaurants That Have More Food Than They Can Sell

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – The USDA estimates that 40-percent of the food that is produced in this country is thrown away. It&rsquos not only an issue for the millions who face hunger, scientists say it&rsquos a major contributor to global warming.

Now a local startup is hoping to make a small dent in this big issue, by encouraging restaurants to sell some of their meals at half price through an app called Food for All. It offers meal discounts from local restaurants that have more food than they can sell.

Sam Newland of Somerville is a big fan. He has a full-time job and a couple of side gigs, so he eats out a lot and he says Food for All has saved him hundreds of dollars on his food bill.

&ldquoI haven&rsquot bought groceries since April,&rdquo he told WBZ-TV.

Discounts offered on the Food for All app. (WBZ-TV)

There are 200 restaurants on the site, about 130 of them are in the Boston area with the rest in New York. Each offers a certain number of half-price meals depending on the day&rsquos sales. A slow day at the restaurant could mean more offers on the app. If a restaurant is busy, they may only offer a few.

According to Sam, you are treated the same as any other customer.

&ldquoYou are getting the same quality food as anybody else,” he said.

Some of the Boston area restaurants include Boloco and the Chicken and Rice Guys.

Sam Newland enjoying a meal at Chicken and Rice Guys. (WBZ-TV)

For the Chicken and Rice Guys, figuring out what they will need to prepare on any given day can be a bit of a guessing game.

&ldquoWe don&rsquot cook to order, so we have quite a bit of waste,&rdquo explained restaurant co-founder Ian So.

According to So, Food for All has helped his small chain cut down on what goes in the dumpster by about 40-percent.

&ldquoIt&rsquos a win-win situation for restaurants,&rdquo explained Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. The idea is that restaurants can increase revenue while cutting down on waste.

Valenga and a friend came up with the idea while trying to make ends meet in college, but they quickly discovered controlling waste was not just about the bottom line.

Food for All co-founder Sabine Valenga. (WBZ-TV)

“One of the most effective things you can do to reverse climate change is reduce food waste,” she told WBZ.

According to the United Nations, food waste is responsible for eight-percent of the world’s greenhouse gases. Scientists say it’s those gases that keep heat from escaping the atmosphere and contribute to global warming.

Some of the gases are produced during farming and production, but it also comes from landfills. When food ends up in landfills, it breaks down and creates methane gas, a powerful greenhouse gas.

Newland appreciates the environmental benefit, but it&rsquos not his primary motivator.

&ldquoI have saved almost $1,000 and probably saved 126 hours,” he said.

The meals are offered at certain pickup times, usually near the end of the lunch or dinner hour.


Watch the video: Το ελληνικό εστιατόριο όπου τρώει η Μέρκελ. mp4 (October 2021).