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Burger King Canada Tops Poutine With a Burger

Burger King Canada Tops Poutine With a Burger

BK Canada added a burger to its poutine

Burger King Canada put a whole burger on top of its poutine.

When a restaurant serves poutine and has burgers in the building, it seems like only a matter of time before someone gets the idea to combine them. But Burger King Canada has taken the experiment beyond the mere "cool idea" phase and added burger poutine to the menu nationwide.

According to Brand Eating, the dish is officially called “Poutine à la Burger,” and it is a bowl of the chain’s regular French fries topped with gravy, cheese curds, and a hamburger with all the fixings, including pickles, ketchup, mustard, and a beef patty chopped into bite-sized pieces. Burger King already had regular poutine and poutine with bacon on the menu, so throwing a burger on there was clearly the next stage in poutine evolution.

One order reportedly has 880 calories, 46 grams of fat, and 1490 milligrams of sodium, but with a name like “Poutine à la Burger,” nobody thought it was going to be diet food.


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


Texas-Style Poutine (If There Was Such a Dish), Because Gravy Makes Everything Good

Poutine (pronounced “pooteen” if you’re anything other than French-Canadian, and “pu-tsin” if you are) is originally a French-Canadian dish from the province of Québec. Their version of this tasty dish is made using French fries topped with cheese curds and finally smothered in a light brown gravy. Often imitated, never duplicated, this fast-food dish can be found in a number of restaurants across Canada as well as some establishments in the northern United States. No longer considered simply a “greasy spoon” concept however, poutine (or creative facsimiles) has turned up in fine dining restaurants which often entails the use of some form of meat (sometimes pulled-pork, other times buffalo-style chicken, etc.) and pubs and food trucks are picking up on the phenomenon, while international food chains such as McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King are selling their mass-marketed models. Why is everyone jumping on the poutine bandwagon? Because gravy makes everything good. So, here’s how Texans should enjoy a big plate of poutine if they were ever inclined to try and concoct it.

Texas-Style Poutine

INGREDIENTS:

2 lbs Russet potatoes (3-4 medium potatoes)

Vegetable or your choice of frying oil

1 – 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

First, prepare the Texas-style poutine gravy. (This can be made ahead and refrigerated, or it can be made in advance and simply kept warm until your fries are ready.) In a bowl, dissolve the cornstarch in water and set it aside. In a large saucepan over low heat, melt the butter and add the flour, stirring regularly to form a roux. Continue stirring for approximately five minutes, until the roux turns a golden brown in color. Now add the beef and chicken broth and turn the heat up to bring to a boil, stirring the mixture with a whisk. Stir in the cornstarch and water mixture, reduce the heat and simmer for 3-5 minutes until the gravy thickens. Season with salt and pepper.

Now for the French fries. Wash and scrub your potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick fries. Place them in a large bowl and cover them completely with cold water. Allow them to sit for at least an hour to a maximum of several hours (depending on when you’re ready to cook.) When it’s time to cook, heat the oil in your deep fryer or a large, wide, deep and heavy frying pan. Your oil temperature should be 300 F. Remove the potatoes from the water and place onto a sheet of paper towel or tea towel to dry. Blot them to remove excess water and moisture. Add your fries carefully to the oil and deep-fry them for 5-8 minutes – just until the fries are starting to cook but aren’t yet browned. Remove the fries from the oil and spread them on a wire rack (for drainage). Increase the oil temperature to 375 F and return the fries to the oil to cook until they are golden brown. Remove them to a paper towel-lined bowl to drain.

To prepare your Texas-style poutine, plate your fries and season them with salt and pepper. Add a generous handful of shredded mozzarella cheese on top, and a ladle of the hot poutine gravy. Repeat layers if necessary, to create the size of plate/dish you would like to serve (translation: consume!) Season again with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!


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