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A Chicken Nugget Festival Is Coming to the UK

A Chicken Nugget Festival Is Coming to the UK

We’re packing a suitcase full of ketchup

Dreamstime

The U.K. is hosting its first ever chicken nugget festival this summer, and we have already decided that we need to go. The Fried Chicken Festival, organized by We Love Food, already has almost 8,000 Facebook users interested in attending, and we are sure as the summer date draws closer that number will only continue to rise.

Although not much is listed about the festival dedicated to golden crispy chicken pieces on its webpage, we know that it will be taking place on August 11 in London and September 22 in Manchester. According to Metro, more dates are rumored to be announced soon.

The festival will have live bands, DJs, and of course a ton of chicken nuggets and fried chicken varieties to try. Their Facebook page even boasts “the best chicken nuggets in London!” as well as “Biggest variety of nuggets in London!”

Metro reports that there will also be a chicken nugget eating competition, where winners are crowned “Nugget King” and “Nugget Queen” for the day. Pre-registration is now open for the event, with actual tickets to be released soon.

Can’t make it all the way to England for nugs? Why not have your own mini chicken nugget festival by replicating The Daily Meal’s ultimate frozen chicken finger taste test!


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


A taste test to determine the best frozen chicken nugget

Like many parents, I practically raised my children on chicken nuggets. Babysitter coming over, mom and dad rushing out? Throw a few nugs in the microwave, along with similarly heated-up corn. Quick school lunch? Nuked nuggets then packed in tin foil. I have even been known to make a makeshift “chicken burger” by sticking a few nuggets under a slice of melted cheese on a bun. Chicken nuggets are a bonafide staple in my house, right up there with squeezey applesauce, a bag of Cuties, and a jar of Nutella. But—have I been buying the best kind?

At Whole Foods I found Bell & Evans, while Trader Joe’s now has two types of nuggets: Chicken Breast Nuggets and Chicken Drummellas. Target offers nuggets from Applegate Naturals. Your regular grocery will still have large bags of Tyson or Perdue Simply Smart Organics chicken breast chunks*.

* But is a chunk the same thing as a nugget? According to the National Chicken Council , “Chicken nuggets are in fact typically made of the same meat that you see in the supermarket, that is, broiler meat… The meat is then ground and formed, just like you would form a meatball from a ground meat product.” The chunks seem to be whole pieces of breast meat, but in bite-sized form, so we kept the Perdue chunks in the mix.

To compare various different types of chicken nugget products—and to get out of having to cook Sunday night dinner—I drafted my family members to taste the lineup (without ketchup, the horror). Most all of the packages suggested the oven instead of the microwave as the preferred cooking method, so I lined them all up side-by-side on a baking sheet. Naturally, that method did kick the ass of my last-minute microwaving. There were even remarkable visual differences among the six, which made sense as we tried to parse out the taste variations between them. To organize our notes, we judged based on breading, chicken, flavor, and texture.


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