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10 Unique Places to Celebrate New Year’s Eve

10 Unique Places to Celebrate New Year’s Eve

Consider enjoying one of these unique celebrations around the world on the last night of the year

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Brasstown, N.C.

In honor of being the self-proclaimed “Opposum Capital of the World,” Brasstown, North Carolina has a unique tradition called the “Possum Drop,” in which a live possum is carefully lowered in a plexiglass cage. The festivities begin at 9:30 p.m. with a bluegrass pre-show at Clay’s Corner convenience store, and continue with the arrival of the guest of honor (the opossum), more bluegrass music, a Miss Possum Contest, and a tribute to veterans. At midnight, fireworks are set off and the opossum is released.

Edinburgh, Scotland

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In Edinburgh, Hogmanay, the Scottish celebration of year's end, lasts for three days and involves a music festival with live bands, DJs, and fireworks. The Loony Dook is a popular event on New Year’s Day, where people dress up in fancy garb (not mandatory, but added fun) and dive into the frigid waters of Firth of Forth, just north of Edinburgh. Usually people stop somewhere for a quick bite and to warm up on the way back.

Harbin, China

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Although the Chinese New Year doesn't start until late January this year, visitors can spend the last night in December in front of Harbin's Saint Sophia Cathedral for the countdown to midnight. Harbin has an Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival that begins officially Jan. 5, but the parks open on Dec. 24 so you can see the incredible ice architectural displays lit up in bright LED lights that give this winter creation a surreal presence.

Naples, Italy

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Watch your head if you’re in Naples, or other cities in Italy, from Rome south, on New Year’s Eve. Along with the huge outdoor music events and fireworks displays to celebrate the New Year, some parts of Naples still celebrate the old tradition of throwing out old furniture and other household items from their windows to make room and prepare for the new year.

Oh, and while you’re there, don’t forget to be a basic tourist and eat pizza while in Italy.

Peel, Isle of Man

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Nothing will wake you up faster than a few quick dips in seawater that's about 9 degrees Celsius (48 degrees Fahrenheit) — four dips to be exact. Adrenaline junkies will get a kick out of this, but all are welcome to join. Between each dip in the freezing water, a shot of dark rum is taken to combat the piercing temperature. The tradition, which began in Peel in 1983, raises money for three charities: Peel Lifeboat, Multiple Sclerosis, and a third one that varies from year to year. At least you’ll be braving the cold water New Year’s Day for a good cause.

Port Clinton, Ohio

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Forget the Waterford crystal ball in Times Square. If you’re interested in watching a 600-pound fiberglass fish descend at midnight, Walleye Madness in Port Clinton is the unique New Year's Eve event you’re looking for. This 20-foot fish, named Wylie the Walleye, has been a New Year’s tradition in this town since 1996. Fireworks add to this festive celebration. While in the seafood spirit, stop in at the Jolly Roger Seafood House for a walleye sandwich and onion rings.

Quito, Ecuador

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Ecuador has a long-standing tradition of burning “los años viejos,” the old years, on New Year’s Eve. People make scarecrow-like effigies of people they dislike or just famous folk, sometimes tacking lists of sins on their bodies, then light them on fire when midnight strikes. A lot of beer is consumed on the occasion, and men dress in drag to beg for brew money. Street dances with plenty of music go on all night.

Reykjavik, Iceland

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Dating back to the Middle Ages, when people burned things they no longer needed, bonfires have been a large part of Icelandic culture, especially on Dec. 31. These bonfires, called brenna, are set up in each district of Reykjavik and are a must if you're in Iceland for the occasion. New Year's Eve can also be a good night to see the Aurora Borealis, if the weather cooperates; as a fallback, plan on celebrating with the rest of the town drinking craft beer.

Scheveningen, Netherlands

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Home to the world's largest bonfire on New Year's Eve, according to the Guinness Book of World Records, Scheveningen is a bright place to celebrate the new year. The community works together starting on Dec. 27 to create this enormous conflagration out of wooden pallets, with musical performances and fireworks adding to this amazing spectacle. As of 2014, the bonfire has been officially listed as part of the Dutch cultural heritage.

Skopje, Macedonia

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If you want to celebrate the new year twice, head to Macedonia. The country celebrates New Year’s Eve on Dec. 31 with the rest of the Western world, but then, on January 14, comes the holiday dubbed Old New Year. Really just another reason to party and spend time with family, the day is spent dancing to traditional folk music, watching fireworks, and lighting bonfires. If you’re in no rush to go home once 2017 begins, stick around for a couple of weeks and celebrate twice — it’s a two-for-one special!


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


9 Unique New Year Traditions From Around The World

New Year is one of the biggest celebrations around the world. Fireworks displays, parties, and countdowns to midnight are some of the most common ways to celebrate, but some cultures have their own unique practices and traditions when welcoming the new year.

From wearing polka dots to walking around the neighborhood with a suitcase, here are some of the unique ways that people from different parts of the world ring in the new year, courtesy -- Culture Trip, Live Science, and Life Hack.org.

Plate Smashing — Denmark

New Year in Denmark is not just about getting luck for oneself but passing it on as well. This is because the Danish have a tradition of smashing a plate onto the door of a friend or neighbor to bring them good luck in the coming year. The more broken plates at the doorstep, the more luck the person will have in the new year.

Dropping Cream For Luck — Switzerland

New Year is that special time when it's okay in Switzerland to drop food on the floor and keep it there on purpose. Evidently, there is a Swiss tradition of dropping a dollop of cream on the floor on New Year's day and letting it stay there to bring good luck in the new year.

Traveling Light — Colombia and Ecuador

Anyone who likes to travel may want to try this tradition in Colombia and Ecuador. In these countries, people walk around with a suitcase with them on New Year's Eve in hopes of having more trips in the coming year.

Having Round Fruits And Wearing Polka Dots — Philippines

In the Philippines, there is a custom of having a set of 12 round fruits. Each fruit represents a month of the year, with the round shapes symbolizing coins or money to attract good fortune and prosperity in the new year.

Similarly, wearing polka-dotted clothing is also considered lucky since the round polka dots, also representing coins or money, are believed to attract prosperity.

Avoiding Chicken — Brazil

While many traditions focus on what to wear or eat for good luck, a tradition in Brazil fixates on what particular food to avoid. As Live Science explained, some people in Brazil avoid eating chicken in the first few minutes of the new year because chickens "scratch the Earth backward." According to tradition, eating poultry could then lead a person to move backward in life instead of forward. As such, chickens are avoided in the new year.

Engaging In New Year 'Fight Club' — Peru

A new year tradition in a village in Peru wipes the slate clean in a rather unique way. There, people essentially engage in a fistfight to resolve their issues and differences. This way, they can begin the new year with a fresh start, albeit with some bumps and bruises.

Hiding Knives — China

Chinese people sometimes choose to hide their knives in the New Year so that people won't cut themselves. Although this just sounds like practical advice, Life Hack.org explained that this is because of the belief that cutting could affect the entire family's luck in the coming year.

Placing Mistletoe Under The Pillow — Ireland

Mistletoes aren't just for surprise kisses in Ireland. There, single women who would like to have a husband in the coming year place mistletoe under their pillow.

Talking To Animals — Romania

According to Life Hack.org, there is a tradition in Romania where farmers try to "communicate" with their animals on New Year. It's not clear how exactly they do this but those who prove to be successful are believed to have good luck in the new year.

While such traditions may seem unusual to other people, they are a part of the many wonderful cultures of the world. And as different they may seem, many of them actually have a common theme that transcends the differences: the hope that the coming year will be better and more prosperous than the previous one.

Pictured: Representative image of sparklers. Photo: S. Hermann & F. Richter


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