Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Cherry-Apricot Cobbler Recipe

Cherry-Apricot Cobbler Recipe

Ingredients

Filling

  • 3 14.5 ounce cans pitted tart cherries in water, drained
  • 1 1/2 cups diced dried apricots
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice

Topping

  • 1/2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/3 cup unbleached all purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons finely grated lemon peel
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Ice cream or whipped cream

Recipe Preparation

Filling

  • Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter 11x7x2-inch glass baking dish. Combine next 5 ingredients in large bowl; toss well. Spread evenly in prepared dish.

Topping

  • Whisk first 5 ingredients in large bowl. Stir in next 5 ingredients. Spoon topping over filling. Bake cobbler until topping is golden brown and juices from filling are bubbling thickly at edges, about 50 minutes. Serve cobbler warm with ice cream or whipped cream.

Reviews Section

Making Cherry Cobbler Using Dried Cherries?

Ask a Question Here are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

Question: Making Cherry Cobbler Using Dried Cherries?

I am looking for a recipe for a cherry cobbler using dried cherries.

Answers

Before you make a cobbler or pie using dried fruit you must simmer it to soften it. I would use apple juice instead of water. Then just add the sugar and a little flour or corn starch like you would any fruit and put it in a crust.

Question: Cherry Cobbler with Dried Cherries?

I am gonna fix my first cobbler ever! I received some dried cherries and want to use them in this cobbler. Please have a simple recipe for me that is both sweet and crusty.

Answers

Most sites recommend plumping up the cherries by adding boiling water before starting.

This seems like a good recipe to start with.
Just read the directions in step 1 on how to use dried cherries.


A Cobbler Recipe for Cobbler People: Cherry and Apricot Cobbler

In this world there are pie people, tart people, and cobbler people.

Pie people, bless their souls, say things like “bless their souls.” They wear aprons and buy toilet paper at Sam’s club.

Tart people are a little edgier, but not much. Their hair is cropped and they wear wire-rimmed glasses. They don’t favor Yanni, but they don’t dislike him either. In Sex and the City terms, tart people are Miranda.

And then there are cobbler people. We’re the rustics, the hands-dirty type. We like finger painting and eating glue. We’re impatient. We don’t care what it looks like as long as it tastes good. We are cobbler people.

What I like about cobbler is that it is so easy. You make the fruit, you make the topping, and you’re done. It’s a great way, also, to try different fruits and to celebrate the season. Except cobbler people don’t say things like “celebrate the season.” Pie people say that.

A few days ago I spotted apricots and cherries at Whole Foods. Remember how I told you to keep your eyes out for what’s in season? This was one of those times. So tonight I scrambled over there, loaded up on ingredients, and came storming back ready to make my cobbler.

After washing the apricots and cherries, I began the pitting process. Pitting cherries is the pits. I tried various techniques, but ultimately relied on my fingers. It took a while. Here are the results:

Now you halve and pit the apricots. This wasn’t too hard, I used a paring knife:

The recipe I used (from Epicurious) has you toss the fruit with sugar, cornstarch and (rather unconventionally) almond extract. After which I poured it into the baking dish:

It baked for 35 minutes at 400 degrees. It came out smelling great:

Meanwhile, I made the topping. This was easy too. First I whisked together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt:

Then I cut up a stick of cold butter into squares. Notice how ingenious (and immodest) I am. I halved the butter lengthwise, flipped it over, halved it again (thus quartering it). Then I sliced down horizontally to get cubes:

Work the butter into the flour with your fingers until it resembles “coarse meal.” I never get this instruction because I am none too familiar with coarse meal. I imagine, though, that coarse meal looks like this:

Sam Neil, on the other hand, looks like this:

Here’s where our recipe gets sloppy. You pour in 3/4 cup of buttermilk and 3/4 cup of whipping cream:

Everything turns quite gloppy:

The cobblers I usually make have crumby toppings this one would turn out biscuity. It made the actual toppping process (glopping the batter on to the fruit) a bit more difficult. “Drop dough by rounded tablespoonfulls” says the recipe. I managed ok, and it looked like this:

Then I baked for 40 minutes at 375 and it came out looking like this:

And it was quite delicious. I was worried for a bit. I thought the cherries wouldn’t be cherryey enough. That the apricots wouldn’t be tart enough. That the topping wouldn’t be crumby enough. But nothing to worry about: everything tasted bright and terrific. This is a good early summer recipe. That is if you’re a cobbler person. And who wouldn’t want to be a cobbler person? We’re the best.


Cherry and Apricot Cobbler with Coconut Biscuits

I love a good cobbler- rustic and not at all fussy. A comforting dessert topped with ice cream but more than an acceptable breakfast served with yogurt. The coconut biscuits are rich and flaky. The ruby filling is lucious and bursting with juicy cherries and apricots. This cobbler is incredibly adaptable too- you can play around with whatever fruit is in season. Strawberries + rhubarb, peaches + blueberries and nectarines + blackberries are a few of my favorites. I have shared a dairy free coconut biscuit but if you prefer a more traditional buttermilk biscuit, replace the coconut oil with butter and the coconut milk with buttermilk.

Cherry and Apricot Cobbler with Coconut Biscuits- GF, DF

Ingredients

Biscuits:
1.5 cups of flour (gluten free or all purpose)
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 teaspoons coconut sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
6 tablespoon coconut oil, solid and cut into small pieces
3/4 cup coconut milk (remove one tablespoon for final step)

Filling:
1.5 pounds apricots, pitted and sliced
1.5 pounds cherries, pitted
1 lemon, zest and juice
1/3 cup coconut sugar
pinch of salt
2 tablespoon arrowroot

Preheat the oven to 375. In a medium bowl mix the flour, salt, coconut sugar, baking powder. Add the butter and combine with your fingers until they are the size of small peas. Add coconut milk (saving the tablespoon) . Lightly stir with a fork until the mixture comes together. Without overworking, lightly knead the dough in the bowl. Roll onto a lightly floured board and roll into about ¾ inch thick. Cut into eight 1 ½ circles or squares (I used the top of a small jar.) Reroll the scraps if needed.

2. Make the filling and top with biscuits:

In a 9 by 13 inch or similar size baking dish toss together the cherries, apricots lemon zest and juice, coconut sugar and arrowroot powder. Top with biscuits and brush with the remaining tablespoon of coconut milk.

3. Bake 40-55 minutes or until the fruit is bubbling and the biscuits are golden brown. Serve warm with a scoop of your favorite ice cream.


11 cherry cobbler dried cherries Recipes

Pear and Dried Cherry Cobblers with Ginger-Chocolate Chip Biscuit Topping

Pear and Dried Cherry Cobblers with Ginger-Chocolate Chip Biscuit Topping

Cherry Cobbler With Vanilla Custard Cream (Raw Vegan)

Cherry Cobbler With Vanilla Custard Cream (Raw Vegan)

Pear Cherry Cobblers With Ginger-Chocolate Chip Topping

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CRISP AND A COBBLER?

Before we talk about how to make this Cherry Crisp recipe, have you ever wondered what the real difference is between a crisp and a cobbler?

Both desserts are baked with a layer of fruit filling and a layer of some sort of pastry topping. The difference between the pastry topping is what makes it a crisp or a cobbler (or even a crumble!)

  • Cobblers have a drop biscuit topping, a pie crust-like topping, or even a cakey topping (like with Easy Peach Cobbler).
  • Crisps have a streusel topping that has oats in it, making the topping&hellipwell, crispy!
  • Crumbles are similar to crisps but traditionally don&rsquot have any oats in the streusel topping, like in Apple Crumble. Although these days the lines are a little bit blurred between crisps and crumbles and sometimes the names are used interchangeably.

Crisps are my personal favorite, but you know I&rsquoll never turn down a good cobbler or crumble!


Try This Easy Cherry Cobbler Recipe Today

And remember to add a scoop of vanilla ice cream on top for additional deliciousness. Enjoy!

Here are a few more delicious cobbler recipes you can find on the blog: Fresh Peach Cobbler, Caramel Apple Pecan Cobbler, Blueberry Cobbler, Peach Blackberry Cobbler, plus many more. Also, there are delicious fruit crisp recipes as well. Check those out as well.


21 tart cherry cobbler Recipes

Deep Dish Cherry Cobbler

Deep Dish Cherry Cobbler

Cherry Cobbler

Cherry Cobbler

Apple-Cherry Cobbler

Apple-Cherry Cobbler

Sweet N Tart Cherry Cobbler

Sweet N Tart Cherry Cobbler

Cinnamon Roll Cherry Cobbler

Cinnamon Roll Cherry Cobbler

Cherry Cobbler (Emeril Lagasse)

Cherry Cobbler (Emeril Lagasse)

Pear Cherry Cobblers With Ginger-Chocolate Chip Topping

Pear Cherry Cobblers With Ginger-Chocolate Chip Topping

Pear and Dried Cherry Cobblers with Ginger-Chocolate Chip Biscuit Topping

Pear and Dried Cherry Cobblers with Ginger-Chocolate Chip Biscuit Topping

Cherry Cinnamon Cobbler

Cherry and Apricot Cake with Amaretto Cream

This cherry and apricot cake bursts with summer fresh flavours!

We&rsquove been hit with a hurricane of last week of school activities. It seems that nearly every night of the week we are at school for one performance or another.

I love my children but at the end of a work day all I want to do is have a quiet dinner at home and maybe spend some quality time on the couch.

So sitting on little chairs made for children or church pews and listen to unending row of children perform left us downright exhausted by the time a weekend came round.

I wanted nothing more than to leave London and wander the countryside somewhere quiet and idyllic.

So Brad and I loaded the kids in the car and set off for ancient ruins of an abbey that got destroyed in the 16th century by Henry VIII when he decided to abandon the Catholic Church and get rid of all monasteries in England.

The day was spent picnicking and playing hide and go seek in the ruins.

After running around in the ruins Brad and I stretched on a blanket that is too narrow for one person and laid there soaking up the sunshine while the kids carried on.

Finally when all the food was eaten and no stone left unturned we gathered our things and drove home past more amazing remnants of English history interspersed with fruit stands.

We did the only thing that was left to do. We stopped and picked up a flat of cherries from Kent, then got home and baked this cherry and apricot cake and whipped up some cream and Amaretto for good measure.

When the long awaited fruit is finally here you don&rsquot want to put it on a cake that is less than stellar.

The sponge has to match the cherries&rsquo sweet and juicy goodness and I&rsquove got just the recipe for you!

I believe not many words are needed to convince you that this sponge is light, buttery rich and pillowy soft and the flavour, which comes from ground almonds, fresh lemon zest and pure vanilla, is just delightful.

Throw a handful of cherries and apricots on top, drizzle with honey and you&rsquove got yourself a jewel studded beauty!

I served it with whipped cream spiked with Amaretto to highlight the almonds, which you can skip, but I wouldn&rsquot if I were you!