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Portugal: four superb sardine recipes

Portugal: four superb sardine recipes

Sardines are eaten all over the world; however, the name is actually a catch-all (see what I did there?) term for lots of different small fishes, the most common being pilchards. What fish you’re actually eating depends completely on where it was caught.

Nowhere holds them in as high regard as Portugal. The Portuguese love fish any time of year, which is partly why all their cities are on the coast, but come summer it’s tough to have a snack or meal that doesn’t include sardines. They’re cooked everywhere, even on the streets. On 13 June every the country they holds a feast in honour of Saint Anthony, a Catholic priest mostly credited with reconciling troubled couples. Quite where sardines come in the rescue of a marriage is unclear, but they say the fatty acids in fish are good for brain function, so maybe it helps people think before they speak.

Another reason it might play such a large part in one of Portugal’s greatest feasts is that sardines are absolutely delicious. Whether from a can or fresh they are super soft, moist, salty and moreish – and they go dynamite with anything slightly acidic, like lemon, vinegar and onion. They also really benefit from fresh herbs, which lift the oily texture and give it some aroma. So here are four brilliant sardine recipes, courtesy of Jamie’s lovely food stylist Georgie, starting with a Portuguese classic straight from the Feast of St Anthony.

Grilled sardines

They couldn’t be easier and they’re super cheap too. Just get a griddle-pan or barbecue screaming hot, rub some fresh sardines with a little oil and some salt and cook straight on the grill until crispy. To check your fish is cooked go to the thickest part of the flesh and it should pinch away easily, leaving the bone. Before serving, squeeze over some lemon juice and maybe some chopped chives or dill too. It’s brilliant with lemony couscous or potato salad. You could try Jamie’s Moroccan-style recipe here.

Pilchard pizza

Similar to the brilliant Stargazey flatbread pizza that used to be served at Jamie’s Union Jacks. Roll out a thin pizza base, cover it with tomato sauce with a dash of chilli and flake over some tinned sardines. Bake at full whack and then finish with some thinly sliced red onion and a sprinkling of fresh chopped parsley.

Sardine spaghetti

Start by frying some sliced garlic, a little chilli, a handful of cherry tomatoes and a few capers. Cook some linguine (roughly 100g per person), drain and toss with it into the pan with a couple of tinned sardine fillets. Once hot, serve up and a drizzle of good-quality extra virgin olive oil.

Pilchard potato salad

Boil some new potatoes and make a dressing with natural yoghurt, a dash of red wine vinegar, salt, pepper, sliced spring onions and dill. Drain the potatoes, leave to cool slightly and then toss in the dressing. Flake in a few sardine fillets and sprinkle over some more freshly chopped dill.

Header image by Ben Coombs


Grilled Sardines With Lemon, Garlic, and Paprika Recipe

Despite their small size, fresh sardines have a lot going for them. They're rich in omega-3 fatty acids, so they're good for you. They're a sustainable source of seafood, so they're good for the oceans and planet. They're also incredibly inexpensive, so sardines are easy on your wallet as well. And with a rich, meaty flavor (think mackerel), sardines simply taste great—but especially so when grilled.

In fact, grilled sardines are a common menu item at many a Spanish tapas joint, where the small fish are enjoyed like corn-on-the-cob, eaten with the hands right off the bone (and yes, cutlery can be used as well).

When grilled, sardines usually need nothing more than a spritz of lemon juice and a sprinkling of sea salt. But I do like to marinate the strongly flavored fish in olive oil, lemon juice, and garlic before they hit the flames. A bit of smoked Spanish paprika in the marinade also helps to echo and extend the smoke and char from the hot grill.

Because of their small size, sardines make for a quick and easy to prepare finger food option, and when quickly crisped over an open flame, they are also great when paired with a glass of Rioja or a cold beer.


  • 2 tbs Olive Oil
  • ½ red pepper finely sliced
  • 1 medium red onion, finely sliced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • ½ cup of Olives, sliced
  • 1 cup (18 small) cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 2 tbs tomato paste
  • ½ red chilli pepper without excessive seeds, sliced
  • 1 tin of sardines
  • Basil leaves, to taste
  • 200 grams of dried Spaghetti
  • Black Pepper
  • Lemon Zest
  • ½ cup of white wine/lemon juice
  1. Place a big frying pan over a medium heat, add the olive oil and a drizzle of the sardine oil. When hot, add the bell pepper and cook until slightly soft.
  2. Add the red onion and garlic and sauté for a further 2-3 minutes.
  3. Add the olives and let everything slowly fry until it reaches a softer texture.
  4. Move your ingredients to one side of the frying pan and if necessary add another splash of olive oil and lightly fry your cherry tomatoes and basil leaves.
  5. Once the skin of the tomatoes start wrinkling, combine it with the rest of the pan, and add our chilli pepper and the sardines, breaking it into smaller pieces.
  6. Add zests of one lemon and a splash of white wine or lemon juice to deglaze the pan and bring all those flavours together. Let it sizzle for another couple of minutes.
  7. While you wait, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. The recommended proportion is around 1lt of water per 100 grams of pasta.
  8. Once the pasta water is boiling, begin cooking your spaghetti. Following the recommended instructions. For “al dente” pasta, remove from the water a minute early to taste. There’s nothing worse than overcooked pasta!
  9. Add the tomato paste and half of a cup of the pasta water into your sauce. Reduce the heat and let it simmer for 3-5 minutes. The starch from the pasta water will help our sauce to bond with the spaghetti. Try the sauce and check if you need to adjust the salt or add another splash of pasta water. As some of the ingredients already contain salt, we didn’t think any extra salt is needed.
  10. Drain the pasta and add it immediately into the saucepan and gently combine everything.
  11. Serve the finished sardine pasta into two pasta bowls and add some freshly grated black pepper and parmesan cheese on top (we know that this goes against the rules but as cheese lovers we think that cheese goes well with everything. Who invented this silly rule anyway?).

Did you try our Sardine Pasta Recipe? Let us know in the comments how it went!

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Welcome to We Travel Portugal! We’re Annie and Ollie and we want to share Portugal with you. You’ll find everything here, from travel guides, to local stories, and even our favourite Portuguese recipes!


Sardinhas Assadas

Sardinhas assadas are a classic grilled sardines dish that is a traditional food from Portugal. This dish is a popular festival favorite and includes hundreds of salt-seasoned sardines cooked on an open grill during celebrations. Sardinhas assadas may be a simple dish but it is packed with bold, big flavor.

Sardinhas assadas in the Portuguese culture

Due to its geographic location along Western Europe’s Atlantic coast, Portugal is a seafaring country and is arguably the most well known sailing nation in the world. With this affinity and proximity to the sea comes a great love for seafood, which is embedded in the Portuguese food culture. And no other seafood embodies Portuguese cuisine like the sardine.

Sardinhas assadas is one of the most popular dishes in Portuguese cuisine and originates from the Lisbon and Vale do Tejo regions. The dish has been a traditional local festival food for saint celebrations for centuries, such as the festivals of John, Peter, and Anthony and the traditional sardine festivals that take place in the first 10 days of August. These festivals often feature hundreds of sardines roasted on a open fire grill inside specially made grates that make flipping easy. It is such a deep part of Portuguese culture that it is common to find grilled sardine festivals in Portuguese immigrant communities throughout the world.

Related Posts:

Sardinhas assadas may seem intimidating but are exceptionally easy to make. After cleaning, the fish are seasoned with coarse salt and grilled on both sides for about 10 minutes. Sardines are typically served on top of a slice of bread, which soaks up the oily fat form the fish, which provides its distinctive flavors. They are often paired with a side of roasted potatoes and peppers.

What are the health benefits of sardines?

Sardines are small, silvery fish that travel in schools and provide one of the highest known sources of omega-3 fatty acids. The healthy fat found in sardines helps to reduce heart disease and has been tied to improved brain health. Sardines are also high in trace minerals such as selenium and are a good source of vitamin B12. The Monterey Aquarium’s Seafood Watch suggests purchasing sardines from the US and Canadian Pacific reasons because of the threat to other sardine populations.

Sardines can be gutted, or “cleaned”, before grilling but many traditional Portuguese recipes also will cook the the sardines whole and removed the innards before eating. The bones of sardines are edible because they are very thin and brittle, but the harder and spiny backbone should not be eaten.

Sardines around the world

Many cultures around the world feature sardines, but nowhere are they more popular than in the Mediterranean cultures. The Greek have grilled sardeles, which are grilled and served with an herb pesto made with dill, parsley, and lemon. The Spanish have sardinhas a la parrilla, which are served with potatoes and a small side salad. And the Italians have sardine alla griglia, which are often served with in a light tomato and wine sauce. There is a also a very popular and interesting sardine dish from Morocco called sardines mariées (married sardines) which consists in 2 sardines in butterfly, that are stuck, then grilled together

Sardines are also popular throughout Asia, with sardines popping up in bahn mi sandwiches from Vietnam and in lemongrass salads in Asia.

Any which way you serve them, sardinhas assadas are a culinary adventure that will have you feeling like you’re at a café along the coast of Portugal.

This recipe is validated by our expert in Portuguese cuisine, Chef Alexandre Silva. Chef Alexandre is the Michelin starred chef-owner of the restaurant Loco in Lisbon.


Grilled sardines

“Plump sardines simply grilled – one of the easiest recipes you’ll ever master. The sardines are sold frozen in Australia and are found in Portuguese and Spanish emporiums. When they’re cooked, their skins slide off like a wetsuit – it’s a party trick I never get tired of. Served with roasted capsicums and red wine, these are the true taste of Portugal.” Maeve O'Meara, Food Safari Fire

Preparation

Cooking

Skill level

Ingredients

  • 3 green capsicums (bell peppers)
  • 2 red capsicums (bell peppers)
  • olive oil
  • vinegar
  • 2 garlic cloves, roughly crushed
  • sea salt
  • 12 whole Portuguese sardines
  • rock salt
  • broa or crusty bread to serve
  • boiled potatoes to serve

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

Standing time 30 minutes

Place the capsicums over a pre-heated charcoal barbecue and char until blackened. Alternatively put under a hot grill or in a hot oven. When done, place them in a plastic bag and tie to close until slightly cooled. Peel the capsicums and tear by hand into strips. Toss with a drizzle of olive oil and vinegar and the garlic, and season with sea salt.

For the sardines, sprinkle liberally with rock salt and set aside for no more than 30 minutes.

Shake a little of the salt off the sardines before placing on the hot charcoal grill.

Grill for 3–4 minutes on each side.

To serve, pull off the skin of the sardines from the head down – it should come off easily. Place the whole fish on slices of crusty bread – or flake roughly. Serve with boiled potatoes drizzled with olive oil and the roasted peppers.

Recipe from Food Safari Fire by Maeve O'Meara (Hardie Grant, hbk, $55). Photography by Kaily Koutsogiannis.

Food Safari Fire starts Thursday 7 January 2016 at 8pm on SBS. Visit the program page for recipes, videos and more.


4 – Bifanas – The National Portuguese Sandwich

Bifanas are traditional Portuguese pork sandwiches, so popular that you’ll find them everywhere in the country.

These Portuguese sandwiches are made of succulent marinated pork served in crunchy white bread. The marinade is made with spices including paprika, garlic, and white wine. The bread has a crunchy crust on the outside while being soft on the inside.

Bifanas can be served with a bowl of soup and fries for a full meal at lunch or dinner time. Or served with beer, for a typical late night Portuguese snack.

There are several variations of the bifanas Portugal sandwiches . You can add more ingredients to your sandwich such as eggs, bacon, lettuce, tomatoes or stick with the traditional one.

Each eatery that makes bifanas will have their own secret recipe for the marinade.

The original Bifana Portugal recipe is said to come from Vendas Novas, a small town in the Alentejo region, mid-distance between Lisbon and Evora.

While little is known about the original recipe, every Bifana eatery claims to make their own version of the original.

Although considered a light Portuguese snack, be wary of the portion sizes. When accompanied by french fries, consider it a full meal.

As far as sandwiches go, the bifana ranks as one of our favorites. You’ll find the perfect combination of crunchy bread and flavorful pork.

So good, you won’t want to miss a bite.

Scrumptious Bifanas sandwich with egg, cheese, tomatoes, lettuce and bacon

15 Canned Sardine Hacks for a Better Snack

If you’re unsure how to eat canned sardines, we have some intriguing ideas for you. Usually tinned sardines are thought of as a last resort for when you can’t be bothered to cook, if not relegated to apocalypse food, but we urge you to reconsider. The small, oily, silvery fish are inexpensive, easy to prepare, and loaded with things that are good for you, like omega-3 fatty acids and calcium. They’re also delicious!

Here are 15 creative serving suggestions for what to do with canned sardines:

Portuguese Sardine Salad

This recipe from chef George Mendes of Michelin-starred Aldea in New York, is a great fresh and healthy option that combines multiple textures and flavors (sweet, smoky, salty, tangy, herbaceous, and a little funky) for a perfectly balanced lunch. Check out the chef’s book, “My Portugal,” for more of his recipes.

Ingredients:

  • 2-4 red bell peppers, washed and thoroughly dried
  • romaine lettuce hearts, washed and thoroughly dried
  • fresh Italian flat leaf parsley, washed and thoroughly dried
  • extra-virgin olive oil (chef Mendes likes Casa Migmag)
  • sherry vinegar
  • smoked paprika (chef Mendes likes La Dalia)
  • 1 can Portuguese sardines (chef Mendes likes the Porthos brand Bela is another good Portuguese brand)
  • salt
  • freshly ground white pepper

Instructions:

2. Toss the whole peppers with olive oil and a generous sprinkle of salt, then roast on a cookie sheet for 30 minutes, or until charred, turning about every 5 minutes. (Alternatively, blister the peppers over hot coals or an open flame.)

3. Place peppers in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand for 15 minutes to further soften them and loosen their skins.

4. Use a spoon or the back of a knife to scrape most of the blackened skin off the peppers, but leave a few specks on for a smoky flavor. Cut off the stem end of the peppers and slice them in half lengthwise, then remove the veins and seeds. Cut the flesh into strips, mimicking the shape of the sardine filets.

5. Place the strips of pepper in a bowl and add 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil, and 2-3 tablespoons of sherry vinegar. Sprinkle in some smoked paprika to taste, mix well, and reserve. The chef recommends making these 1 to 2 days in advance, but if you’re short on time, as little as 5-10 minutes will do.

6. When ready to assemble the salad, slice the romaine into bite-size pieces and mix with whole parsley leaves to taste (as many or as few as you like).

7. Drain sardines and cut in half lengthwise, then remove and discard the bones and excess skin if you prefer (leave them be if you like a more rustic preparation). Roughly cut sardines into small pieces and mix with the lettuce and parsley. Add some of the juice from the pickled roasted peppers and mix again to coat.

8. On a plate, make a base layer of pickled roasted peppers, layer the lettuce-herb-sardine mixture on top, and finish with another drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkle of sherry vinegar, sea salt, and freshly ground white pepper, plus a few more pepper strips for a pop of color.


Sardine recipes

Discover the best sardine recipes from BBC Good Food. We've got recipes for all seasons, making the most of thrifty canned sardines and fresh fish alike.

BBQ sardines with chermoula sauce

Serve sardines with a delicious lemon, chilli and herb chermoula sauce for the ultimate taste of summer. Perfect for a lazy afternoon barbecue

Sardine pasta with crunchy parsley crumbs

An affordable way to include oily fish in your diet. Canned sardines are a great source of omega 3 and add oomph to this simple, family pasta dish

Sardines & tomatoes on toast

Tinned sardines are a cost-effective way to get plenty of heart-healthy oily fish. Keep a can in the cupboard for a quick dinner or lunch for one

Lemon & marjoram sardines with walnut & pepper dressing

We've created the ultimate recipe for glowing skin, packed with nutrients like calcium, vitamin C and heart-healthy omega-3 fats

Sardines & peperonata on wholemeal toast

Punchy flavours combine in this 12-minute meal, rich in fibre, iron and omega-3 - make quick peperonata with pre-roasted peppers, capers, shallot and garlic

Spicy fennel linguine with sardines & capers

Fennel adds an aniseed punch to this quick pasta dish with chilli-infused sardines, zesty lemon and parsley


The Great Sardine Taste-off – wild, organic, Kosher, Polish, etc

The short story: Angelo Parodi sardines are the only truly exceptional sardines sampled so far.

In the interest of eating healthy occasionally, for a few months I’ve been having sardines for lunch every now and then.

The standard supermarket brands were sampled: King Oscar, Bumble Bee, Brunswick and Beach Cliff.

There were a few lesser known supermarket brands: Yankee Clipper, Gourmet Award.

Then there were some types that are found usually in ethnic and/or gourmet stores: Albo, Madrigal, Palacio Real, Mega and Angelo Pardoni

I’ll probably branch out in the next few months with more imported brands from ethnic stores. Any recommendations would be appreciated.

(Best canned sardines to “wouldn’t buy again:” The “won’t buy” list starts at Mega sardines not a bad sardine, but not fond of sardines in tomato sauce)

Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo – Portugal/Italy - $1.99
Albo Sardines in Olive oil – Spain - $4.99
King Oscar Sardines Mediterranean style – Norway, packed in Poland - $2.99
Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in soybean oil – Morocco - $2.49
King Oscar Extra Small Sardines in fish oil 2 layers – Norway - $2.99
Beach Cliff Sardines in soybean oil – USA / Canada - $.69
Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water No Salt Added – Canada - $1.19
Madrigal spiced sardines in vegetable oil – Morocco - $1.59
Brunswick Sardines in Olive Oil – Canada - $1.19
King Oscar Extra Small Brisling Sardines in purest virgin olive oil – Norway - $2.99
King Oscar tiny tots Sardines in olive oil two layers – Norway - $2.99
Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked) – Spain - $2.99
King Oscar Sardines in pure spring water – Norway - $2.99
Mega Sardines in tomato sauce with chili – The Philippines - $.79
Brunswick Sardines in Mustard Sauce – Canada - $1.19
Bumble Bee Sardines in Mustard – Poland - $.89
Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $2.49
Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in mustard sauce – Morocco - $2.49
King Oscar Sardines in tomato – Norway - $2.99
Brunswick Sardines in Mustard and Dill Sauce – Canada - $1.19
King Oscar Skinless & boneless Sardines in olive oil – Morocco - $2.99
Gourmet Award lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $1.89
Brunswick Sardines in tomato & basil Sauce – Canada - $1.19

At the start, I didn’t know what to look for besides taste. Toward the end it was this:

- SHAPE- Sardines should keep their shape – some fall apart or are mushy in texture

- INGREDIANTS - Whatever they are packed in (oil, water, tomato paste, mustard, hot sauce, salsa, pesto, etc.) should balance and enhance rather than compete with or overpower the fish.

Avoid sardines with stuff like Maltodextrin, Acetic Acid, Modified Cornstarch, Xanthan Gum, Polysorbate 80, Artificial Color, and Artificial Flavor. These are usually in sardines in mustard, tomato or other sauces. READ THAT INGREDIANT LIST .

Even worse, they should not taste artificial. The King Oscar sardines in pesto sauce were so memorably bad, that I couldn’t bring myself to buy them again to include in this recent tasting.

Prices ranged from 69 cents to $4.99 per can.

Bottom line, in terms of taste, with one exception, price doesn’t reeeally matter.

The one major exception to this - Angelo Parodi was so entirely heads above every other brand in terms of taste.

Ironically I couldn’t find canned sardines from the country that gave these small fish the name. Some of the first fish packed in oil rather than preserved in salt, were caught off the coast of Sardinia. However, all of the Italian markets near me only sold Portuguese sardines imported by the Italian company Angelo Parodi.

These are as good as it gets sardine-wise. They had almost a tuna taste and texture and were packed in a rich, golden olive oil.

Beach Cliff – the cheapest about 69 cents often on sale at Walgreen’s three cans for a buck were impressive. They are a mild, meaty, non-fishy sardine.

They are certified Kosher. They are “made in the USA’ with processing plants in Maine using Atlantic sardines that cruise the coast of Maine. They are gluten-free to those that that matters.

Actually most sardines are gluten-free, except for some brands packed in tomato and mustard sauce which use thickeners. My theory is that the quality of the sauce-packed sardines isn’t as good as the ones that are water or oil packed. The quality is obvious the less ‘dressed’ the fish so they are better tasting.

A lot of brands have Bumble Bee as the parent company. They include Beach Cliff, King Oscar, and Brunswick. For some reason sardines with the actual Bumble Bee brand name on the can are processed in Poland. When I think Poland, I know I think sardines. Then again, I’m of Polish ancestry. I eat sardines. It makes sense kind of.

King Oscar: Although they claim they are oak-smoked, that flavor never comes across even in the plain water version. BTW, that’s a picture on the can of the real King Oscar II who ruled Sweden and Norway from 1872 to 1905. Above his picture you will see the words, “By Special Royal Permission.”, the only Norwegian product granted that by the Royal Norwegian Court

While usually healthy, sardines are a food you should not eat if you have gout. At the bottom is a link to the Beach Cliff page that has an excellent write-up on the health benefits of sardines.

Sardines are one of the fish that is lowest in mercury. These small fish feed on plankton rather than other fish that have mercury in them. However, depending on where they are caught some sardines are high in pcbs.

Ever wonder about how they get the guts out of sardines” Bumble be on their site says the vacuum them out. Nobody says how they skin and de-bone sardines. If that is done by hand, has that got to be one of the all-time awful jobs.

King Oscar sardines kept in the nets long enough to empty their intestinal tracts, so they have been naturally cleaned of all ‘sediments’ before processing.

The FDA says that fish must be adequately processed so that they are not "feedy fish" “their stomachs are filled with feed at the time the fish are taken from the water. Such fish deteriorate rapidly until the viscera and thin belly wall disintegrate producing a characteristic ragged appearance called "belly-blown." Yuck.

Some brands say they are ‘wild’. However, all sardines are wild. There are no sardine farms at this time. As far as organic sardines, that just means the olive oil or tomato sauce is organic. Only one company makes that claim – Vital Choice. Haven’t tried them yet because they are only sold in packs of six cans. Too much commitment for me.

Sardines from the Philippines and Thailand are, for the most part, packed in small cans similar to tomato paste cans. They usually are packed in tomato sauces or hot tomato sauce. I tried one brand which actually was the best of the tomato sauce based sardines sampled. For some reason, it was an obstacle to overcome. The different packaging just seemed weird.

It made me wonder about that oblong shaped can. Sardines were the first canned fish. Joseph Colin of Nantes, France was the first to successfully can them. In 1866, the oblong sardine can was
invented by J. Osterhoudt, which had the special key to open it that was used until the pull top can came along recently

There is some tin can / canning history in this link.

Canning food started when Napoleon offered a prize to anyone who could preserve food for the army to carry with them. The first metal can was invented around 1810. The first can opener was invented in 1858. Think about that. Hammers and chisels were used to get at the canned food until then.

By the Way, there is no such fish as a sardine. Sardines can any one of about 20 types of small soft-boned saltwater fish. They are usually herring (Americas), pilcards (Medditerean), brisling (Norway), and sprat.

Size – my casual grading:
Large = length of can
Small = ½ length of can or smaller
Medium = anything in between

Brand: Albo Sardines in Olive oil
Calories per can: 240
Ingredients: sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: While I’m not sure if the can is worth five bucks, this was one of the best can of sardines, mainly for the balance. These medium sized sardines were not too fishy or boney. They held their shape and didn’t fall apart. The olive oil was excellent without calling attention to itself. The sardines weren’t anything too much except perhaps expensive. The only nit was they were noticeably, but not objectionably salty.

Brand: Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo
Calories per can: 120
Ingredients: sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: These Portuguese sardines imported and sold by an Italian company established in the 1800’s. These large sardines (three to a can) almost had the taste of Italian tuna and were complemented by a very nice olive oil. If I were going to spend more than $1 a can, these would be it. Here is more about the company in English
http://www.whoswho-sutter.com/cgi-bin.

Brand: Beach Cliff Sardines in soybean oil
Calories per can: 200
Ingredients: sardines, soybean oil, salt
Taste: These were the biggest sardines with only three snuggled in the can. They didn’t look pretty either with some of the skin scraped off. Yet the flavor was good. The soybean oil was nicely neutral giving a nice mouth feel. They held their shape well also. They lose a few points in prettiness which is made up for in taste.

Brand: Brunswick Sardines in Mustard Sauce
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: Sardines, Water, Mustard, Acetic Acid, Modified Corn Starch, Salt, Turmeric, Spices, Xanthan Gum, Natural Flavor and Color
Taste: These were large size sardines in a mild mustard sauce. They held their shape. The mustard complemented the sardines the best of any I’ve tried.

Brand: Brunswick Sardines in Mustard and Dill Sauce
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: sardines, water, mustard, soybean oil, acedic acid, modified cornstarch, salt, sugar, tumeric, dill, xanthan, gum, spices, annato
Taste: These were not great. Large sardines that fell apart, the contents were almost mushy. If there was dill, I imagined it. Unpleasant and didn’t want to keep in my mouth to try to taste the dill.

Brand: Brunswick Sardines in Olive Oil
Calories per can: 190
Ingredients: sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: Large sardines in a mild oil. Good value for the price.

Brand: Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water No Salt Added
Calories per can: 140
Ingredients: sardines, spring water
Taste: Large sardines and mild sardines. Very good

Brand: Brunswick Sardines in tomato & basil Sauce (Safeway)
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: sardines, water, tomato paste, modified cornstarch, salt, sugar, basil, soybean oil, citric acid, extract of paprika and other spices, XANTHAN GUM, polysorbate 90
Taste: Ugly. The tomato sauce was like a thin version of the type you get in spaghetti-o’s, but not as tasty. Perhaps the faint metallic taste was the basil. Sardines were very ‘spiney’. I suspect the flavored versions of sardines use an inferior brand.

Brand: Bumble Bee Sardines in Mustard
Calories per can: 140
Ingredients: SARDINES, WATER, VINEGAR, SOYBEAN OIL, MUSTARD POWDER, SUGAR, TURMERIC, SALT, MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, XANTHAN GUM, BLACK PEPPER
Taste: Large sardine. Nice neutral mild mustard sauce that complements the sardines. Fine sardines. Fall apart but no excessively so. So far best mustard brand. Polish people know mustard.

Brand: King Oscar Extra Small Sardines in fish oil 2 layers
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: Norwegian brisling SARDINES, salmon oil, SALT
Taste: The fish oil was salmon oil. Actually these were great taste-wise with very little fishy taste. However, they also fell apart into little pieces. Don’t know if soaking in salmon oil did that. I will (and have) bought these again.

Brand: King Oscar Extra Small Brisling Sardines in purest virgin olive oil
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: SARDINES, olive oil, SALT
Taste: packed along the small size of the can. Assertive olive oil flavor, not the best, but ok

Brand: King Oscar Skinless & boneless Sardines in olive oil
Calories per can: 230
Ingredients: SARDINES, olive oil, SALT
Taste: Boneless sardines always taste too dry with very little sardine flavor

Brand: King Oscar Sardines in pure spring water
Calories per can: 140
Ingredients: Norwegian brisling SARDINES, water
Taste: Medium sardines. Pronounced sardine taste. Sardines kept their shape. Bones not apparent. Despite fishy sardine taste, there was a clean flavor to these.

Brand: King Oscar Sardines in tomato
Calories per can: 170
Ingredients: Norwegian brisling SARDINES, water, tomato paste, s0ybean oil, onion, sugar, potato paste, salt, spices, garlic powder. Vinegar, paprika
Taste: Probably the best of the tomato sauce versions, but really the sauce did not have that much tomato flavor and the medium sardines were not the best of King Oscar’s.

Brand: King Oscar Sardines Mediterranean style
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: Norwegian brisling SARDINES, olive oil, black olive, sunflower oil, spices, garlic powder, red bell pepper, pepper, salt, artificial smoke flavor
Taste: These were excellent sardines. The fillets were delicate, non fishy and the blend of spices worked well with the sardines. There were nice pieces of olive in there too.

Brand: King Oscar tiny tots Sardines in olive oil two layers
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: Norwegian brisling SARDINES, olive oil, salt
Taste: Not as tiny as one would be led to believe. Slightly larger than 1/2 can size and packed in a medium quality olive oil. Both the sardine and olive taste were pronounced. Fell apart a bit, but basically good shape. Ok, but for me, other varieties of King Oscar were better.

Brand: Gourmet Award lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce
Calories per can: 180
Ingredients: sardines, tomato concentrate, water, soybean oil, salt
Taste: These were not tasty. The tomato sauce was bland and the sardines fishy

Brand: Madrigal spiced sardines in vegetable oil
Calories per can: 250
Ingredients: sardines, vegetable oil, spices, salt
Taste: Large size sardines in spicy hot vegetable oil, a piece of bay leaf and three tiny peppers. Best of the hot sardines where the spices worked with the sardines rather than overpowering them.

Brand: Mega Sardines in tomato sauce with chili
Calories per can: 150
Ingredients: Sardines, tomato paste, iodized salt, spices chili
Taste: These were lovely delicate large sardines in a nice tomato sauce that was pleasantly and not too assertively spiced. Talk about packaging influencing a product. These are the sardines in round tomato paste type cans sold in Filipino markets. Didn’t think I’d want to try anything not in a traditional can, especially from an unknown manufacturer and the second lowest price. What a surprise. They actually were the best tasting sardines in tomato sauce without the junk US manufacturers put in. It seems as though most of the Filipino sardines come in tomato sauce. A slight tinny taste like lots of canned tomato sauce.

Brand: Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked)
Calories per can: 130
Ingredients: sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: Well, the can says ‘wild caught’ so that might give it the edge if I didn’t think all sardines are wild.Very fishy and the spines were apparent. Olive oil wasn’t so great that it gave it an edge. It will come in below all the other olive oil sardines because the price is double and even triple with no advantage. NO smoke was apparent

Brand: Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in mustard sauce
Calories per can: 180
Ingredients: sardines, water, soybean oil, acedic acid, mustard, vinegar, salt, sugar, modified starch, tumeric, spices, xanthan, gum, natural flavor
Taste” Large sardines in a mild mustard sauce. Usually I like Yankee Clipper, but while holding their shape these sardines were a little too large (4 to the can) and mushy. The mustard sauce overpowered the smoke taste.

Brand: Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in soybean oil
Calories per can: 240
Ingredients: lightly smoked sardines, soybean oil, salt
This is sardine classic. Four or five large sardines in all their fishy sardine glory, they tend to break up easily. The light, but assertive smoke, adds an extra dimension of flavor. One of the few in oil sardines I like on their own. Little sardine spines are more apparent than most brands..

Brand: Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce
Calories per can: 180
Ingredients: lightly smoked sardines, tomato concentrate, water, salt, soya oil
Taste: Like other Yankee Clipper sardines, they had a lovely smoked flavor. Tomato sauce on sardines don’t do it for me. While the sauce was the best, it just doesn’t enhance the taste.

Brand: Albo Sardines
Manufacturer: Albo

Brand: Beach Cliff
Manufacturer: Bumble Bee Crop
http://www.beachcliff.info

Brand: Brunswick
Manufacturer: Bumble Bee Seafoods
http://www.bumblebee.com

Brand: Bumble Bee
Manufacturer: Bumble Bee Seafoods
http://www.bumblebee.com

Brand: Gourmet Award
Manufacturer: Gourmet Award Foods

Brand: Madrigal
Manufacturer: Unimer

Brand: Mega Sardines
Manufacturer: Mega Fishing corp.
http://www.megasardines.com

Brand: Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked)
Manufacturer: Palacio Real

Brand: Yankee clipper
Manufacturer: American Natural & Specialty Brands
http://www.treeoflife.com/Products.as.

OTHER INTERESTING SARDINE LINKS

THE TALE OF THE TINY TIN: A CASE STUDY ON EATING SARDINES FOR DECADES, AND NOT KNOWING MUCH ABOUT THEM – UNTIL READERS ASKED

Lots of Sardine facts and links

More about processing and catching sardines and herring scales are used for woman’s cosmetics . For that extra shine?


The Great Sardine Taste-off – best canned sardines – Next 7

After trying 30 types of canned sardines here are my thoughts:

- Sardines caught near Portugal or Spain are the best with a meaty tuna flavor
- Italian grocery stores carry the best brands of Portuguese sardines (in my area anyway)
- Olive oil is the best medium for sardines
- Really skip those flavored with tomato sauce or mustard
- Read that ingredient list there is no reason for anything but fish, oil/water or salt

Here are the next 7 canned sardines, in order of preference:

1. Matiz Gallego sardines in olive oil - Spain - $2. 99
2. Idamar Portuguese Sardines in olive oil - Portugal - $2. 25
3. Gonsalves Sardines in olive oil – Portugal - $1.99
4. Da Morgada Sardines in Pure Olive Oil - Portugal - $3. 99
5. BELA-Olhão lightly smoked sardines in cayenne pepper-flavored extra virgin olive oil. - Portugal - $1. 75
6. Crown Prince One Layer Sardines in soy bean oil no Salt - Scotland - $1. 85
7. Brand: BUMBLE BEE Sardines in Water – Poland - $.89

The top four sardines were almost equally delicious. Appearance or price was the deciding factor. If a $4 and a $2 can tastes similar, the less expensive option was ranked higher.

After thirty cans of sardines, Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo, still is the clear winner. My can of French sardine is in the mail.

Full ranking and link to previous post at end.

Size – my casual grading:
Large = length of can
Small = ½ length of can or smaller
Medium = anything in between

Brand: BELA-Olhão lightly smoked sardines in cayenne pepper-flavored extra virgin olive oil.
Calories per can: 260
Ingredients: Sardines, extra virgin olive oil, cayenne pepper-flavor, salt, natural smoke flavor
Taste: Nice meaty texture and held their shape nicely. Did not have the more assertive tuna flavor of other Portuguese sardines but were less fishy. Caynenne was barely noticeable, a little after tingle. Flavor is in the oil. Not like some spicy sardines where the spice takes over. You taste the sardine first, then the oil. Neutral olive oil. While these were good, they didn’t have the flavor punch of some of the other sardines or an olive oil that had any special deliciousness. I wouldn’t go out of my way to seek these out.

Brand: BUMBLE BEE Sardines in Water – Poland - $.89
Calories per can: 120
Ingredients: SARDINES, WATER, SALT
Country of origin: Poland
Taste: 5 large uniform size sardines that held their shape with not too much spine. They were a mild sardine with a touch of bitterness. Would not buy again.

Brand: Crown Prince One Layer Sardines in soy bean oil no Salt
Calories per can: 230
Ingredients: Brisling sardines, soy bean oil
Taste: Eight medium sardines that looked really nice in the can – very silvery skin with few nicks. Fell apart easily. Very nice delicate texture. Classic sardine taste (not the tuna taste of Portuguese sardines). Lovely smoke flavor that was prominent but not overwhelming. A little bit of bitterness. Naturally wood-smoked. Probably wouldn’t seek them out, but might try other Crown Prince varieties.

Brand: Da Morgada Sardines in Pure Olive Oil
Calories per can: some sort of European measurement I couldn’t figure out.
Ingredients: Sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: four large sardines, skin intact. Saltier than most. Excellent tuna flavor without being too fishy. Nice mild olive oil. Fresh taste.

The website says these are “ Pilchardus Walbaum are collected from the waters just off the shore of Portugal. They are caught between May and November, when sardines are at their best. Only fresh fish is allowed. The process involves manual cleaning and very careful handling, followed by the traditional cooking in a grill oven before being canned”

Might buy again. For the price they were not significantly better and I would have to make special trip to buy them. Do like the attention to quality.

Brand: Gonsalves Sardines in olive oil
Calories per can: 260
Ingredients: sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: Three large sardines which held their shape nicely and had a ‘tuna’ taste to them. Mild olive oil, A few points off for shabbiness of skin. Not overly spiny. Would buy again.

Brand: Idamar Portuguese Sardines in olive oil
Calories per can: 235
Ingredients: Sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: Three fat sardines. Presented in can with the black backs, so it was alarming to see the dark fish in the can instead of the silvery skin that sardines have on the side and belly.
Tuna flavor, not as assertive as most. Good balance of oil and sardines. Nice rich olive oil. Would buy again.

Brand: Matiz Gallego sardines in olive oil
Calories per can: 228
Ingredients: Sardines, olive oil, salt
Taste: Three VERY plump sardines. Medium fish smell. Italian tuna taste.& mild olive oil. Nice balance. Would buy again

1. Angelo Parodi Sardine Portoghesi all’olio di olivo – Portugal/Italy - $1.99
2. Gallego sardines in olive oil - Spain - $2. 99
3. Idamar Portuguese Sardines in olive oil - Portugal - $2. 25
4. Gonsalves Sardines in olive oil – Portugal - $1.99
5. Da Morgada Sardines in Pure Olive Oil - Portugal - $3. 99
6. Albo Sardines in Olive oil – Spain - $4.99
7. King Oscar Sardines Mediterranean style – Norway, packed in Poland - $2.99
8. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in soybean oil – Morocco - $2.49
9. King Oscar Extra Small Sardines in fish oil 2 layers – Norway - $2.99
10. Brand: BELA-Olhão lightly smoked sardines in cayenne pepper-flavored extra virgin olive oil. - Portugal - $1. 75
11. Beach Cliff Sardines in soybean oil – USA / Canada - $.69
12. Brunswick Sardines in Spring Water No Salt Added – Canada - $1.19
13. Madrigal spiced sardines in vegetable oil – Morocco - $1.59
14. Brunswick Sardines in Olive Oil – Canada - $1.19
15. King Oscar Extra Small Brisling Sardines in purest virgin olive oil – Norway - $2.99
16. King Oscar tiny tots Sardines in olive oil two layers – Norway - $2.99
17. Crown Prince One Layer Sardines in soy bean oil no Salt - Scotland - $1. 85
18. Palacio Real Small Sardines in Olive oil (slightly smoked) – Spain - $2.99
19. King Oscar Sardines in pure spring water – Norway - $2.99
20. BUMBLE BEE Sardines in Water – Poland - $.89
21. Mega Sardines in tomato sauce with chili – The Philippines - $.79
22. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard Sauce – Canada - $1.19
23. Bumble Bee Sardines in Mustard – Poland - $.89
24. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $2.49
25. Yankee Clipper lightly smoked sardines in mustard sauce – Morocco - $2.49
26. King Oscar Sardines in tomato – Norway - $2.99
27. Brunswick Sardines in Mustard and Dill Sauce – Canada - $1.19
28. King Oscar Skinless & boneless Sardines in olive oil – Morocco - $2.99
29. Gourmet Award lightly smoked sardines in tomato sauce – Morocco - $1.89
30. Brunswick Sardines in tomato & basil Sauce – Canada - $1.19


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • ½ pound chicken thighs, cut into pieces
  • ½ pound chicken drumsticks, boned and cut into pieces
  • 7 ounces cubed cooked ham
  • 2 smoked pork sausages, sliced
  • 2 links pork sausage, casings removed and sliced
  • 3 cups rice, rinsed and drained
  • 4 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 2 spring onions, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 6 cups water
  • 2 cubes chicken bouillon
  • 3 leaves cabbage, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil, or to taste

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, chicken thighs, and drumsticks cook and stir until starting to brown, about 10 minutes. Add ham, smoked sausages, and fresh sausages. Cook and stir until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

Stir rice, tomatoes, red bell pepper, spring onions, salt, and parsley into the saucepan. Pour in water and add chicken bouillon cubes. Reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until flavors are combined, about 15 minutes. Stir in sliced cabbage. Continue to cook until rice is tender and water has been absorbed, about 15 minutes more.


Watch the video: Σαρδέλες Παστες Σε Λάδι.. (October 2021).