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Ponderosa parent names Thomas A. Sacco COO, EVP

Ponderosa parent names Thomas A. Sacco COO, EVP

Homestyle Dining LLC, parent to the Ponderosa and Bonanza Steakhouse brands, this week named Thomas A. Sacco as chief operating officer and executive vice president.

Plano, Texas-based Homestyle Dining would not comment on Sacco’s predecessor, but the online business-networking site LinkedIn indicates Pete Pascuzzi last held the post.

Sacco has worked in senior-level positions at such chains as BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse, Fox Sports Grill and Wyatt’s Cafeterias. He most recently was chief operating officer at Strong Electric LLC in Austin, Texas.

Sacco has also served as senior vice president of operations and franchise support for Bonanza Steakhouse and Western Sizzlin Steakhouse.

“We are very excited to add someone of Tom’s caliber and background on our team,” Tamara S. Jones, president and chief executive of Homestyle Dining, said in a statement. “His personal connection to our brand combined with his vision and passion for building our team will be a great contribution to our future success.”

Homestyle Dining, which was the company that emerged from the bankruptcy of Metromedia Steakhouses Co. and affiliates in 2009, has more than 200 Ponderosa and Bonanza Steakhouses in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, Asia and the Middle East.

Contact Ron Ruggless at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter: @RonRuggless


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service


Top Women in Metro New York Foodservice & Hospitality 2018

As we get set to reflect on 2017 and welcome in 2018, it dawned on us that many of the significant stories that we covered this year shared a common theme: women in foodservice! From the election of Victoria Vega to the leadership position at SHFM (Society for Hospitality and Foodservice Management) to the $2.4 billion dollar sale of Buffalo Wild Wings, women have been at the centerstage of the industry.

That’s a long way from 1989, when the then-upstart Women’s Foodservice Forum (WFF) conducted a survey of women in the foodservice industry, specifically asking them about professional aspirations. Not one respondent expressed desires to be CEO. From Sally Smith who departs as BW’s President and CEO, to the one and only Alice Elliot of the Elliot Group who is empowered to find the next CEO and president for New York and Americas’ top chains, to Manhattan chef/owner Angie Mar and Little M. Tucker’s Morgan Tucker, women are making their mark on the restaurant and foodservice industry.

As we noted last year, we continue to interview professionals from all aspects of the industry, we see what used to be location-location-location has clearly evolved into people-people-people. We are convinced that the stakes have become so high with restaurant space rents fluctuating from $500 to $2K a square foot in Manhattan, that the proverbial glass ceiling continues to crack. There simply isn’t any time or wiggle room to worry about gender, it is all about competence.

Women are finding increased opportunity as ownership and management focuses on the ability to consistently create a signature customer dining experience in a Manhattan restaurant, a New Jersey corporate dining facility or a Long Island healthcare facility to deliver a world-class customer experience. That’s why once again we have dedicated this issue to profiling the impact that women have had on the Tri-State foodservice scene. They have risen to amazing heights and turned the Greater NYC Marketplace into the epicenter of the world’s restaurant and food service industry.

Certainly, it’s easy to point to the growth of culinary programs and food programming on television, which has led to pockets of culinary excellence in Metro NYC and across the country but in the Tri-State area, these talents reach far beyond just the back of the house. We owe special thanks to a number of colleagues that represent many segments of the Tri-State foodservice community. They were gracious with their time to help us build this list of the “best and the brightest” women in our industry. We selected categories based on that input.

Our mission for the criteria of this list was to identify innovators within each of those major disciplines of the foodservice and hospitality industry. Women are having a major impact on the bricks and mortar design of restaurants, and the sales of equipment supplies and service. They also have major impact on what food and beverage is being served on local menus, and the management and marketing of foodservice facilities.

Our goal is to share some of their amazing stories and to make all of us realize that any goal is accomplishable with a measure of hard work and some good luck sprinkled in.

Leslie Klashman
Fred Klashman
Publishers, Total Food Service