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Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

Ingredients

  • 1 3-pound boneless pork loin, rolled and tied
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 large onion, cut into 8 wedges
  • 2 fresh rosemary sprigs, leaves stripped from stems, plus additional sprigs for garnish
  • 1/2 cup low-salt chicken broth
  • 1 large garlic clove, pressed

Recipe Preparation

  • Position rack in center of oven; preheat to 450°F. Using vegetable peeler, remove peel (orange part only) in strips from 3 blood oranges. Place pork in large roasting pan. Rub with 2 tablespoons olive oil; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss onion, orange peel, and rosemary leaves with remaining 1 tablespoon oil in medium bowl; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Arrange onion mixture around pork. Roast until pork and onion are beginning to brown, about 25 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, squeeze enough juice from oranges to measure 3/4 cup; pour juice into small saucepan. Add wine, broth, and garlic. Boil until reduced to 1 1/4 cups, about 7 minutes.

  • Add 1/2 cup orange juice mixture to roasting pan. Baste pork with pan juices. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F; continue roasting pork until thermometer inserted into thickest part of pork registers 150°F, basting often and adding more orange juice mixture as needed, about 30 minutes longer.

  • Place pork on platter and cover loosely with foil. Place roasting pan over medium-high heat; add remaining 3/4 cup orange juice mixture to pan. Boil until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. Remove strings from roast. Slice pork; place on platter. Pour sauce and onion mixture over and around pork. Garnish with rosemary sprigs and orange slices.

Recipe by Amelia SaltsmanReviews Section

Cumin-Crusted Pork

We’re celebrating the height of citrus season with one of our favorite fruits: the gorgeous blood orange. Known for its crimson-hued flesh and juice, we’re using it here along with dried Turkish figs to create a sweet and tart sauce for our roasted pork (rubbed with spices like cumin, coriander and sumac). A bed of nutty farro and aromatic fennel completes this hearty winter dish.

Title

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Cut off and discard any fennel stems. Quarter the bulb lengthwise cut out and discard the core, then cut crosswise into ¼-inch-thick pieces. Finely chop the figs. Halve the orange and squeeze the juice into a bowl, straining out the seeds. Roughly chop the almonds.

Line a sheet pan with foil. Pat the pork dry with paper towels season all sides with salt, pepper and the spice blend. In a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned pork. Cook, turning occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Leaving any browned bits (or fond) in the pan on the stove, transfer to the prepared sheet pan. Roast 20 to 22 minutes, or until cooked through. (An instant-read thermometer should register 145°F.) Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for at least 5 minutes.

While the farro cooks, add 2 teaspoons of olive oil to the pan of reserved fond heat on medium-high until hot. Add the fennel and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 11 to 13 minutes, or until lightly browned and softened. Transfer to a plate. Wipe out the pan.

In the same pan, heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the figs season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently, 2 to 3 minutes, or until slightly softened and fragrant. Add the vinegar and ¾ cup of water season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, 6 to 7 minutes, or until the figs have softened and the sauce has thickened. Turn off the heat and stir in the orange juice season with salt and pepper to taste.

To the pot of cooked farro, add the cooked fennel, almonds and a drizzle of olive oil stir to combine and season with salt and pepper to taste. Find the lines of muscle (or grain) on the rested pork thinly slice crosswise against the grain. Divide the finished farro and sliced pork between 2 dishes. Top the pork with the pan sauce. Enjoy!

Tips from Home Chefs

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Preheat the oven to 450°F. Wash and dry the fresh produce. Heat a large pot of salted water to boiling on high. Cut off and discard any fennel stems. Quarter the bulb lengthwise cut out and discard the core, then cut crosswise into ¼-inch-thick pieces. Finely chop the figs. Halve the orange and squeeze the juice into a bowl, straining out the seeds. Roughly chop the almonds.

Line a sheet pan with foil. Pat the pork dry with paper towels season all sides with salt, pepper and the spice blend. In a medium pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the seasoned pork. Cook, turning occasionally, 3 to 5 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Leaving any browned bits (or fond) in the pan on the stove, transfer to the prepared sheet pan. Roast 20 to 22 minutes, or until cooked through. (An instant-read thermometer should register 145°F.) Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for at least 5 minutes.


Pair Pork Loin Roast With Blood Oranges

In this month&rsquos lot of food magazines, I found several recipes that used blood oranges or blood orange juice.

In this month&rsquos lot of food magazines, I found several recipes that used blood oranges or blood orange juice.

If you&rsquore not familiar with blood oranges (sometimes labeled moro blood oranges), their appeal is the striking color of the flesh, and their unique flavor. Blood oranges also have few, if any seeds.

Their flesh is a brilliant red or deep orange or orange streaked with crimson. Blood orange flavor profiles are just as different, from sweet to super sweet to sweet-tart.

Since, citrus and pork go together just like pork chops and applesauce, this recipe for Roast Pork Loin with Blood Orange Mostarda caught my eye because it looked so inviting, as whole pork roasts often do. But it was also the mostarda and the roasted blood oranges that made it interesting.

Once the pork loin is tied (don&rsquot skip this, it help it stays together and keep its shape) it&rsquos brushed with a mix of blood orange juice and seasonings, including fresh rosemary. The juice helps keep the meat moist, and the rosemary provides earthy, woodsy notes.

With the blood orange and orange quarters, they are roasted separately, to bring out and caramelize their sugars. Once roasted you can eat the roasted blood orange flesh or squeeze the juices over the pork.

In this recipe, the mostarda threw me. I never heard of it. Mostarda (mohss-TAHR-dah) is Portuguese for mustard, according to Webster&rsquos New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts by Steven Labensky, Gaye G. Ingram and Sarah R. Labensky (Prentice Hall, $25.95). But many define mostarda as a Northern Italian dish of fruit cooked in a sweet syrup and mustard powder and seed.

Mostarda is traditionally served with boiled or roasted meats. You can think of it like a chutney.

There are lots of ways to make mostarda, but basically it&rsquos made by soaking dried and fresh fruit in water or a sweet wine for at least several hours or ideally, by some recipes, for 24 hours. This recipe takes a short cut, using only golden raisins as the fruit and cooking them in blood orange juice and white wine.

Roast Pork Loin with Blood Orange Mostarda

Serves: 8 / Preparation time: 40 minutes / Total time: 2 hours

1 center-cut boneless pork loin (3 ½ to 4 pounds)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon ground coriander

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Juice of 4 blood oranges (about 1 ½ cups)

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Make the pork: Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven preheat to 350 degrees F. Tie the pork with kitchen twine at 1-inch intervals so it keeps its shape. Combine 2 tablespoons olive oil, the zest and juice of 1 blood orange, the garlic, rosemary, coriander, 1 ¼ teaspoons salt and a few grinds of pepper in a small bowl. Rub all over the pork. Set a rack in a large roasting pan put the pork on the rack and let stand at room temperature, 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, quarter the remaining 3 blood oranges (do not peel). Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet along with the red onions. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Roast the pork on the lower oven rack until golden brown and a thermometer inserted into the center registers 145 degrees F, about 1 hour 10 minutes. About halfway through, roast the oranges and onions on the upper oven rack until softened and just starting to char, 25 to 30 minutes set aside until ready to serve. Remove the pork from the oven and let rest 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the mostarda: Combine the blood orange juice, wine, 1 cup water, the raisins, sugar, honey, mustard seeds, rosemary and 1 tablespoon mustard in a medium saucepan bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until thick and syrupy, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove the rosemary sprig and stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon mustard and the vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside until ready to serve. (The mostarda can be made up to 4 hours ahead reheat before serving.)

Untie the pork and slice transfer to a platter along with the roasted oranges and onions. Serve with the mostarda.


Preparation

For complete preparation instructions please go to: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Blood-Orange-Roast-Pork-Loin-240673

Nutrition facts label for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

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NUTRITIONAL TARGET MAP&trade The Nutritional Target Map&trade allows you to see at a glance how foods line up with your nutritional and weight-management goals. The closer a food is to the right edge of the map, the more essential nutrients per calorie it contains. For a more nutritious diet, select foods that fall on the right half of the map.

The closer a food is to the top edge of the map, the more likely it is to fill you up with fewer calories. If you want to restrict your caloric intake without feeling hungry, choose foods from the top half of the map.

Foods that are close to the bottom edge are more calorie-dense. If you want to increase your calorie intake without getting too full, choose foods from the bottom half of the map.
Read more about the Nutritional Target Map

Nutritional Target Map for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

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The good : This food is low in Sodium. It is also a good source of Vitamin C and Thiamin, and a very good source of Protein and Selenium.

CALORIC RATIO PYRAMID&trade This graphic shows you what percentage of the calories in a food come from carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and alcohol. If you are trying to achieve a specific distribution of calories, such as the 40/30/30 distribution of the Zone&trade diet, or the more traditional 60/30/10 distribution, the Caloric Ratio Pyramid&trade will show you how recipes, meal plans, or individual foods line up with those goals.

Foods low in fat, for example, will cluster along the bottom edge of the pyramid, ranging from foods that are high in carbohydrates (at the left edge) to foods that are high in protein (at the right edge). Foods low in carbohydrates will cluster along the right edge of the pyramid, with foods that are high in fat at the upper edge and foods that are high in protein at the lower edge. Foods that have roughly the same number of calories from fats, calories, and protein will be found closer to the center of the pyramid.
Read more about the Caloric Ratio Pyramid

Caloric Ratio Pyramid for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

This feature requires Flash player to be installed in your browser. Download the player here.

ESTIMATED GLYCEMIC LOAD&trade Glycemic load is a way of expressing a food or meal's effect on blood-sugar levels. Nutrition Data&rsquos patent-pending Estimated Glycemic Load&trade (eGL) is available for every food in the database as well as for custom foods, meals, and recipes in your Pantry.

How to interpret the values: Experts vary on their recommendations for what your total glycemic load should be each day. A typical target for total Estimated Glycemic Load is 100 or less per day. If you have diabetes or metabolic syndrome, you might want to aim a little lower. If you are not overweight and are physically active, a little higher is acceptable.
Read more about the eGL

Nutrient Balance Indicator for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

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NUTRIENT BALANCE INDICATOR&trade This symbol offers a visual representation of a food's nutritional strengths and weaknesses, with each spoke representing a different nutrient. The spoke for dietary fiber is colored green, protein is blue, vitamins are purple, minerals are white, and yellow represents a group of commonly overconsumed nutrients: saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.

A Completeness Score between 0 and 100 is a relative indication of how complete the food is with respect to these nutrients. Although few (if any) individual foods provide all the essential nutrients, the Nutrient Balance Indicator and Completeness Score can help you construct meals that are nutritionally balanced and complete.
Read more about the Nutrient Balance Indicator

Protein Quality for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

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PROTEIN QUALITY Protein quality is dependent on having all the essential amino acids in the proper proportions. If one or more amino acid is not present in sufficient amounts, the protein in your diet is considered incomplete.

Each spoke on the Protein Quality graph represents one of the nine essential amino acids, and the graph shows how close the protein in your diet is to the optimal distribution of amino acids recommended by the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board.

An Amino Acid Score of 100 or higher indicates a complete or high-quality protein. If the Amino Acid Score is less than 100, a link is provided to complementary sources of protein. By combining complementary proteins, you may be able to increase the overall quality of the protein you consume.
Read more about Protein Quality

Footnotes for Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

" indicates a missing or incomplete value.

Percent Daily Values (%DV) are for adults or children aged 4 or older, and are based on a 2,000 calorie reference diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower based on your individual needs.

Nutrition Data's Opinion, Completeness Score™, Fullness Factor™, Rating, Estimated Glycemic Load (eGL), and Better Choices Substitutions™ are editorial opinions of NutritionData.com, given without warranty, and are not intended to replace the advice of a nutritionist or health-care professional. Nutrition Data's opinions and ratings are based on weighted averages of the nutrient densities of those nutrients for which the FDA has established Daily Values, and do not consider other nutrients that may be important to your health or take into account your individual needs. Consequently, Nutrition Data's higher-rated foods may not necessarily be healthier for you than lower-rated ones. All foods, regardless of their rating, have the potential to play an important role in your diet.

The Amino Acid Score has not been corrected for digestibility, which could reduce its value.

NUTRITION DATA'S OPINION Nutrition Data awards foods 0 to 5 stars in each of three categories, based on their nutrient density (ND Rating) and their satiating effect (Fullness Factor&trade). Foods that are both nutritious and filling are considered better choices for weight loss. Foods that are nutritious without being filling are considered better choices for healthy weight gain. Foods that have more essential nutrients per calorie are considered better choices for optimum health.

Nutrition Data also indicates whether a food is particularly high or low in various nutrients, according to the dietary recommendations of the FDA.
Read more about Nutrition Data's opinion


Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin

Position rack in center of oven preheat to 450°F. Using vegetable peeler, remove peel (orange part only) in strips from 3 blood oranges. Place pork in large roasting pan. Rub with 2 tablespoons olive oil sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss onion, orange peel, and rosemary leaves with remaining 1 tablespoon oil in medium bowl sprinkle with salt and pepper. Arrange onion mixture around pork. Roast until pork and onion are beginning to brown, about 25 minutes.

Meanwhile, squeeze enough juice from oranges to measure 3/4 cup pour juice into small saucepan. Add wine, broth, and garlic. Boil until reduced to 1 1/4 cups, about 7 minutes.

Add 1/2 cup orange juice mixture to roasting pan. Baste pork with pan juices. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F continue roasting pork until thermometer inserted into thickest part of pork registers 150°F, basting often and adding more orange juice mixture as needed, about 30 minutes longer.

Place pork on platter and cover loosely with foil. Place roasting pan over medium-high heat add remaining 3/4 cup orange juice mixture to pan. Boil until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. Remove strings from roast. Slice pork place on platter. Pour sauce and onion mixture over and around pork. Garnish with rosemary sprigs and orange slices.


Blood Orange Roast Pork Loin - Recipes

Grilled Pork Tenderloin with Orange Marmalade Glaze

Natalie&aposs Estate Winery

In the video below, Boyd Teegarden shows you how to make this awesome start-of-summer dinner! Recipe follows.

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup orange marmalade
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 1/3 tbsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1 pinch crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 lb pork tenderloin
  • 2 scallions thinly sliced
Instructions

In a small saucepan, bring the soy sauce, marmalade, honey, rice vinegar, and red pepper flakes to a simmer over medium heat. Remove from the flame and let cool to room temperature. Distribute the glaze evenly in 2 bowls. Marinate the tenderloin roast for a minimum of 1 hour in the glaze.

Heat the grill to medium. Put on the tenderloin. Grill on one side about 6 minutes, depending on size of pork loin. Then flip it, baste it. Grill another 6 minutes. Start checking with a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat, at about 6 minutes on the second side. Cook until internal temperature reaches 140 degrees. Remove from heat.

If you have let the temperature get above 140 degrees, youmay need to slice the pork immediately or the meat will continue to cook as itrests and become overcooked. If you have taken it out in time, let the porkrest 10 minutes. Thinly slice, sprinkle with the remaining glaze and scallions.


  • 1 pork shoulder roast (3 to 4 lbs. trimmed pork butt)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small can (6 ounces) frozen orange juice concentrate (thawed)
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 3 tablespoons flour mixed with 3 tablespoons cold water

Place the pork shoulder roast in slow cooker sprinkle with salt and pepper.

In a bowl, combine orange juice concentrate, brown sugar, nutmeg, and allspice pour over the pork roast. Cover and cook on HIGH for 1 hour. Reduce heat to LOW and cook for 8 hours.

Before serving, skim fat from juices and pour the cooking juices into a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and cook, stirring, until slightly reduced and the flavors are concentrated.

Whisk in the flour and water mixture and continue cooking until thickened. Serve the thickened juices with the pork roast.


All Things Italian

1 c Aliseo blood orange juice*
1 3-lb boneless pork loin, rolled and tied
3 T good EVOO*
1 large onion, cut into 8 wedges
2 fresh rosemary sprigs, plus garnish
1/2 c dry white wine*
1/2 c chicken broth
1 garlic clove, minced
Sea salt & fresh ground pepper*

Place a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 450*. Take the onion and the rosemary leaves and toss in 2 teaspoons of the olive oil. Place the pork in a roasting pan and rub with the remaining olive oil. Season with sea salt and pepper. Scatter the onion mixture around the pork and roast for 25 minutes, until the onions are browning.

In the meantime, add the blood orange juice to a small saucepan, along with the wine, chicken broth and garlic. Bring to a boil and let boil until reduced by about a quarter, about 7 minutes. When the pork has roasted for 25 minutes, remove from the oven, lower the temperature to 350*, and add about 3/4 of the liquid mixture to the roasting pan. Reserve the remainder. Baste the pork with the pan drippings and liquid.

Return to the oven, basting frequently, until the internal temperature at the thickest point is 150 degrees. Begin to check after 30 minutes. Move the pork to a serving platter and cover loosely with foil. Add the reserved liquid to the roasting pan, scraping up any browned areas. Bring this sauce to a boil and let boil until slightly thickened, 5 minutes. Slice the pork into serving sizes and drizzle with the sauce. Garnish with orange slices and rosemary.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup orange juice
  • ⅓ cup soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 3 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 (3/4 pound) whole pork tenderloins
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Make the orange marinade by whisking together the orange juice, soy sauce, rosemary, and garlic. Pour over pork tenderloin and marinate for at least one hour, preferably overnight.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (205 degrees C). Drain pork, reserving the marinade, and place on a baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Roast for about 20 minutes until internal temperature has reached 145 degrees F (63 degrees C).

Meanwhile, strain the reserved marinade and bring it to a simmer in a small saucepan. Serve this as a sauce for the meat.


Test kitchen recipe: Pair pork loin roast with sweet and tart blood oranges

In this month’s lot of food magazines, I found several recipes that used blood oranges or blood orange juice.

If you’re not familiar with blood oranges (sometimes labeled moro blood oranges), their appeal is the striking color of the flesh, and their unique flavor. Blood oranges also have few, if any seeds.

Their flesh is a brilliant red or deep orange or orange streaked with crimson. Blood orange flavor profiles are just as different, from sweet to super sweet to sweet-tart.

Since, citrus and pork go together just like pork chops and applesauce, this recipe for Roast Pork Loin with Blood Orange Mostarda caught my eye because it looked so inviting, as whole pork roasts often do. But it was also the mostarda and the roasted blood oranges that made it interesting.

Once the pork loin is tied (don’t skip this, it help it stays together and keep its shape) it’s brushed with a mix of blood orange juice and seasonings, including fresh rosemary. The juice helps keep the meat moist, and the rosemary provides earthy, woodsy notes.

With the blood orange and orange quarters, they are roasted separately, to bring out and caramelize their sugars. Once roasted you can eat the roasted blood orange flesh or squeeze the juices over the pork.

In this recipe, the mostarda threw me. I never heard of it. Mostarda (mohss-TAHR-dah) is Portuguese for mustard, according to Webster’s New World Dictionary of Culinary Arts by Steven Labensky, Gaye G. Ingram and Sarah R. Labensky (Prentice Hall, $25.95). But many define mostarda as a Northern Italian dish of fruit cooked in a sweet syrup and mustard powder and seed.

Mostarda is traditionally served with boiled or roasted meats. You can think of it like a chutney.

There are lots of ways to make mostarda, but basically it’s made by soaking dried and fresh fruit in water or a sweet wine for at least several hours or ideally, by some recipes, for 24 hours. This recipe takes a short cut, using only golden raisins as the fruit and cooking them in blood orange juice and white wine.

ROAST PORK LOIN WITH BLOOD ORANGE MOSTARDA

Serves: 8 / Preparation time: 40 minutes / Total time: 2 hours

1 center-cut boneless pork loin (3 1/2 to 4 pounds)

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary

1 tablespoon ground coriander

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Juice of 4 blood oranges (about 1 1/2 cups)

2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1 tablespoon white wine vinegar

Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Make the pork: Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven preheat to 350 degrees F. Tie the pork with kitchen twine at 1-inch intervals so it keeps its shape. Combine 2 tablespoons olive oil, the zest and juice of 1 blood orange, the garlic, rosemary, coriander, 1 1/4 teaspoons salt and a few grinds of pepper in a small bowl. Rub all over the pork. Set a rack in a large roasting pan put the pork on the rack and let stand at room temperature, 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, quarter the remaining 3 blood oranges (do not peel). Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet along with the red onions. Drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Roast the pork on the lower oven rack until golden brown and a thermometer inserted into the center registers 145 degrees F, about 1 hour 10 minutes. About halfway through, roast the oranges and onions on the upper oven rack until softened and just starting to char, 25 to 30 minutes set aside until ready to serve. Remove the pork from the oven and let rest 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the mostarda: Combine the blood orange juice, wine, 1 cup water, the raisins, sugar, honey, mustard seeds, rosemary and 1 tablespoon mustard in a medium saucepan bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce the heat to medium low and simmer until thick and syrupy, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove the rosemary sprig and stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon mustard and the vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside until ready to serve. (The mostarda can be made up to 4 hours ahead reheat before serving.)

Untie the pork and slice transfer to a platter along with the roasted oranges and onions. Serve with the mostarda.