Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

7 Ways to Survive the #Limepocalypse

7 Ways to Survive the #Limepocalypse

The lime dearth has caused quite the shake-up.

Bars and drinkers have been coping with an unexpected problem for the last few weeks.

It has affected Gimlets and Margaritas alike. Its name: the limepocalypse, as we call the current lime shortage here at Liquor.com HQ.

The lime dearth has caused quite the shake-up. Many bars and supermarkets are no longer carrying limes, and the cost of the fruit at some outlets has skyrocketed to more than a dollar apiece, making many drinks plain uneconomical.

Thankfully, limes aren’t the only citrus that tastes great in a drink. Let’s not forget as the lime-famished screaming gets louder: Plenty of classic cocktails use either lemon or orange juice.

Even during the darkest of lime times, there is still a ray of citrus sunshine.

This story was originally published at Liquor.com. For more stories like this join Liquor.com and drink better. Plus, for a limited time get How to Cocktail in 2014, a cocktail recipe book—free!


Resident Evil Village: 8 Killer Tips To Help You Survive The Horror

Resident Evil Village bombards you with spooky monsters, sprawling environments, and lots of mechanics that aren’t fully explained. To ease you into the latest survival-horror masterpiece from Capcom, we’re sharing some insights we’ve gleamed from hours (and hours) of gameplay. It’s still early in our journey through the very strange village of RE8, but there’s plenty of little bits of info you’ll really want to know.

RE8 dumps the protagonist of the previous big game into a mysterious Eastern-European village. It isn’t long before you’re being swarmed by werewolves, flying bat monsters, and a whole gaggle of insane cackling monster bosses. Your previous savior Chris Redfield and his army buddies have turned on you, killing your wife and kidnapping your kid — and now Ethan will face any hardship to get them back. There’s a lot of hardship in the first few hours of RE8. Here’s a few tips to make life (slightly) easier.

More Resident Evil Village guides:

#1. Shoot Monsters In The Right Spots

Monsters are faster and deadlier in RE8, so if you want a better chance at surviving — and taking less damage — you’ll want to aim for the right spots. Shooting monsters in the legs will make them fall over, naturally. Shooting them in the head does the most damage, and increases your chances to stagger. And shooting their arms can cause them to drop whatever weapon they’re holding. Weapons are the deadliest weapons enemies use in melee range. Their bites aren’t nearly as scary, and don’t have as long reach. If you want to make a fight safer, start by shooting monsters right in the weapon arm.

Later you’ll encounter enemies shooting arrows at you or even throwing stuff. You can use your knife to deftly swat flying projectiles out of the sky — just like in RE4! But it’s probably best to just shoot that stuff out of their hands before they can even attack.

  • NOTE: And don’t forget you can perform a Quick-Turn. Press [Back + Circle / B] to quickly perform a 180 degree turn. Very useful in almost any situation. Run away from an enemy, then spin around to give yourself the most time possible to react. It’s one of the most useful moves in the game, and the tutorials don’t even explain it!

#2. The Castle Is Packed With Hidden Items

RE8 has a useful new feature that lets you smash crates by pressing [Cross / A]. It saves you time, but you’ll still want to keep the knife handy. Castle Dimitrescu and other areas of the map are packed with bonus items. Look behind glass display cases, or smash smaller vases that don’t have prompts. There are plenty of items you can find by smashing everything in the environment! Some areas can even be destroyed with explosives. Keep your hands on Pipe Bombs to blast through walls.

#3. Don’t Sell All Valuables Right Away!

Valuables are a special class of item that you can sell to the Merchant for big payouts. Collecting valuables — and completing treasure hunts — is the best way to get the money you need for useful upgrades. Not all valuables are created equal. Items like Crystallized Skulls can be instantly sold, but certain items increase in value if you combine them. Before selling items, check your inventory with [Triangle / Y] and tab over to the Treasures list. If a valuable says [Combinable], that means you can combine it with another treasure. This always makes the treasure worth more than both valuables combined, and often by a very significant amount. Always hang onto these treasures as long as possible to combine them and get a huge reward.

#4. Your Own Explosives Don’t Hurt You

Here’s a lesson anyone that’s played RE4 knows already. Explosives in RE8 don’t hurt you. You can play a mine directly at your feet. The most you’ll get is a little knockback, but you won’t take damage. Only enemies are damaged by any of your explosive weapons. Pipe Bombs will nudge you, but they’ll blast enemies into chunks. If you’re being chased by a gang of enemies in a tight corridor, don’t be afraid to just plant a mine or throw a Pipe Bomb. Even if you’re easily in the blast radius, you’ll be fine. It takes some getting used to — really, no other FPS works like this. Normally throwing a grenade at your feet is very bad in Call of Duty. In RE8, we follow different rules.

#5. The Map Is Almost Too Useful

Your map is an incredibly powerful tool for finding items. Areas marked in red are ‘incomplete’ — you haven’t found everything in a room. If a room is marked blue, then you know there’s nothing left to find there. The map also marks rooms that require specific types of keys, making backtracking to potential treasure-filled rooms you might skip otherwise a lot easier. Backtracking is a powerful tool, and once you get your hands on more key items, you’ll want to return to previous areas for a second once-over. Some of the best treasures in the game are locked away in areas you normally don’t return to!

#6. Remember Outdoor Locations & Open Windows

Lady Dimitrescu employs a trio of killer daughters that chase you throughout the castle. These bug-infested ladies can’t be harmed with bullets, so there’s absolutely no reason to fight them. Just run when they appear — and especially make note of rooms in the castle that are exposed to the outside. The Courtyard, and the back room of the Kitchen, are both open to the cold air outside. The cold is the Daughter’s weakness, and they won’t follow you into cold areas. When they’re giving chase, just run immediately to the closest cold zone. They’ll disappear and won’t come back for a good amount of time.

Now you just have to deal with Dimitrescu herself. If she’s lumbering around, just stay out of her way.

#7. Don’t Fight When You Can Run!

Lady Dimitrescu isn’t the only constant threat in Castle Dimitrescu. Her daughters appear too. And then there’s the vampiric ghouls that appear everywhere once you’ve made enough progress. These creatures appear endlessly, and they very rarely give you rewards that are worth the ammo you’ll waste on them. If you don’t want to spend money on ammunition, I suggest just running by these ladies and ignoring them. They most often spawn in the Courtyard, where there are plenty of side-paths you can use to avoid them. Go ahead and take them down if they’re threatening you, but don’t worry about clearing out the room.

There’s a reason why you’ll want to watch out for fight-or-flight encounters. The game always gives you ammunition when you need it, so if you really need to fight, you’ll be stocked. If you’re meant to run — just take a quick look around. Is there no ammo? No supplies? Yeah, that means it’s time to start running and / or hiding. If you’re smart about running away from optional encounters and only engaging enemies when it’s requiring, you’ll save a lot more ammo… and a lot more health drinks.

#8. What To Buy From The Merchant First

The Merchant doesn’t just sell healing items and bullets. He also sells incredibly useful permenant upgrades like recipes. Recipes allow you to craft enhanced items like shotgun bullets, rifle bullets, and explosive mines. I recommend buying recipes as early as you can. They’re not very expensive, and the extra utility you get from crafting items is absolutely worth it. You never need to buy ammo from the vendor, especially if you can just create the type of ammo you want through crafting.

I don’t recommend buying the Inventory Upgrade until later in Castle Dimitrescu. You’ll acquire the Pistol, Shotgun, and Sniper Rifle as you explore — with a little re-arranging, you’ll be able to carry all three. After getting those, you’ll need that Case Upgrade ASAP. Save up 10,000 coins by completing the Treasure Hunts you find and buy it when you’re practically bursting at the seems with items. By then, you should have enough cash for the Pistol and Shotgun Damage Upgrades anyway! Get the recipes, the damage upgrades, and the extra inventory space when you can. There’s no weapon box to store stuff, so it’s your only option.


How To Eat Keto The Right Way, According To A Nutritionist

The Ketogenic or Keto diet has quickly become one of the most buzzed-about diet plans out there. But when there are so many people enthusiastically touting its benefits – and an equal number of critics shaking their head in disapproval – separating facts from fiction can become a little overwhelming.

In order to better understand the basics of this low-carb diet, I spoke with Angela Mavridis, an LA-based holistic nutritionist and founder of TRIBALÍ Foods.

First things first, what is the Ketogenic diet?

"The Ketogenic diet is all about minimizing your carbs and upping your fats. The goal is to get the body to metabolize fat, rather than sugar," says Mavridis.

"While everyone's body and needs are slightly different, that typically translates to – 60-75% of your calories from fat, 15-30% of your calories from protein, and 5-10 % of your calories from carbs," she explains.

Most common Keto-friendly foods include low-carb vegetables (think bell pepper, cauliflower, spinach and zucchini), eggs, cheese, unprocessed and grass-fed meat and seafood.

Why should you try this diet?

The Ketogenic diet was introduced in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy. But the benefits of this low-carb diet go beyond treating seizures. It promotes weight loss, improves cardiovascular health and helps with anxiety and depression.

"The biggest benefit of a Keto diet is metabolic flexibility. When you’re able to pull energy from both glucose and Ketones that the body produces, you are metabolically flexible, which has benefits that extend throughout your entire body. Think mind, body and soul," says Mavridis.

Also, when you eliminate sugar and high-carb foods from your daily diet, "your body is able to heal itself and detox from the accumulated inflammation that it is constantly fighting," That means less brain fog, improved cognition and brain health. Consequently, the improved mental clarity makes it easier for you to make smart food choices, adds the nutritionist.

Moreover, following a Keto diet also reduces inflammation. "Reduced inflammation can have myriad benefits, from improving your skin to healing your gut and treating the symptoms of ailments like acid reflux disease," she explains.

However, you must lay the groundwork before jumping on the Keto bandwagon. This means "lowering your carbs to under 20 grams for at least two to six weeks in order become Keto-adapted. Once you've done that, you

can go in and out of Ketosis and reap the benefits of not being glucose-dependent," says Mavridis.

The three biggest mistakes people on Keto diet make (that you should totally avoid):

    Loading up on fat bombs and other highly fat concentrated foods to get their

macronutrient ratios in line: "Fat should be used as a satiating nutrient. People don't necessarily need to eat fat bombs and put extra fat on their food or in their coffee just to make it high-fat," says Mavridis. While this is a good strategy for when you're transitioning from a glucose-dependent diet to a fat-fueled one, it's not necessary once you’re fat-adapted, she adds. This is where intuitive eating comes into play. Learn to pay attention to your hunger cues. "If you’re feeling hungry shortly after a meal then you probably did not have enough protein or fat. But if you’re full and satiated, there is no reason to consume excess quantities of fat," explains the health expert.

Who can benefit from this diet plan?

Those with skin conditions like acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and dandruff could benefit from this diet. This is because "eliminating sugar and high-carbohydrate foods from your diet helps your body to heal itself and detox from the accumulated inflammation that it is constantly fighting," explains Mavridis.

You may also be a great candidate for the Keto diet if you experience migraines, joint pain, muscle weakness or mental fatigue. In addition, "Keto diet can be beneficial for mental health conditions like depression, autism and Alzheimer's". Other than that, "you can also follow this diet plan if you're trying to get pregnant since it improves fertility", she notes.

Who should avoid the Ketogenic diet?

As with other eating plans, keto diet isn't suitable for anyone. It "may not be appropriate for those with medical conditions, such as diabetes or ailments related to kidneys, pancreas or liver. It should only be done under close medical supervision in those situations," says the LA-based nutritionist.

Also, "anyone considering Ketogenic diet should undergo a health screening to rule out any conditions that could contradict with this diet," she suggests.

Keto 101: How to transition to a Keto diet, the right way

"Reprogramming your body from being a sugar burner to ultimately being a fat burner can take anywhere from two to six weeks, depending on your current metabolic state, your sugar-dragon, and your mindset," says Mavridis.

So, unless you’re already eating very clean or Paleo, it can be hard for you to jump all into this new way of eating. It’s all about your individual journey towards attaining optimal health and you need to start with where you’re at.

"My suggestion is to start with changing your mindset first and foremost around three very important facts: this is not just another diet, you don’t have to live in Ketosis forever, and you will not be depriving yourself. Having said that, if you are used to eating highly-processed sugary food and refined carbohydrates you’ll need to ease into it," she explains.

"The very first step, in my opinion, is to eliminate the C. R. A. P. = Carbohydrates, Refined Sugars, Artificial Foods, Processed Foods," Mavridis suggests. Start by removing refined sugars and processed carbohydrates (such as bread, pasta, sugary drinks, energy bars, cereals, alcohol, sweets, etc.).

This doesn’t mean that you can never have some of your favorite foods again. Once you get past the adaptation phase and you have tested that you are in Ketosis, you can start experimenting with Keto versions of the foods you don't want to give up. Here are a few simple Keto recipes to start with. If you're looking for ready-to-eat Keto-friendly options, check out Country Archer Meat Sticks, Cuvee Coffee and FBOMB nut butters.

The other crucial thing to consider when you're beginning a keto diet is to test your blood Ketones and monitor your carb intake. Without it, you'll never truly know if you’ve reached Keto adaptation.

Note that the adaptation phase can be the most difficult and "generally resembles how you were eating beforehand –could cause headaches, fatigue and withdrawals for some," Mavridis points out. So, don't forget to take it slow and easy.

Four quick Keto diet tips for best results:

If you are already following the Keto diet and are having success nutritionally, emotionally, and cognitively, then keep doing what you’re doing, Mavridis suggests. If, on the other hand, you are not feeling well, then it may be time to re-evaluate.

  • Get in and out of Ketosis. Avoid the common mistakes mentioned earlier and try and cycle in and out of Ketosis – to give your body a break and to train your body to be flexible as to what sources of fuel it burns.
  • Listen to your body. Some people incorporate dairy into their Keto journey and others do not. Your body will send you signals as to how it reacts to certain foods. It’s up to you to listen and customize the diet accordingly.
  • Upgrade the quality of nutrients the best that you can. "Consume organic produce, grass-fed and finished pasture-raised meats, and wild-caught seafood, as well as healthy anti-inflammatory fats. And eliminate vegetable and seed oils," says the nutrition expert.
  • Change your lifestyle habits. Remember that in order to reap maximum benefits, it's important to stick to your eating plan and follow a healthy lifestyle. This includes regular exercise, staying hydrated, getting enough sleep and eliminating additional toxins and stressors.

And lastly, remember that the "Keto diet is a somewhat limiting eating plan, and hard to sustain long-term", so you needn't follow to it once you've achieved your desired weight or fitness goals, unless medically subscribed," Mavridis suggests.


Seven Ways to Fight Back Against Cold & Flu Season

It’s quickly becoming that time of year again when the leaves change, the temperature drops and the days aren’t quite as long. For some of us, it might also be the time where we have a little tickle in our throat, a stuffy nose we can’t quite shake, or just that feeling of being a little rundown.

As the seasons change it can be hard for our bodies to adapt and much easier for us to get sick. This is why it’s important to know how to support your immune system (the body’s defense against illness and infection).

The fall and winter months are a beautiful time, but they can also be a busy time, and if you’re anything like me you simply don’t have time to get sick! The good news is there are many natural ways to support the body through cold and flu season so we can enjoy the upcoming holidays with ease!

1. Vitamin C

Perhaps the most well-known vitamin for cold and flu viruses, vitamin C is a superhero this time of year! By directly supporting the immune system with its powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, vitamin C helps prevent us from getting sick and can help minimize symptoms if we do. Although vitamin C can be taken as a supplement, many of our favorite whole foods are jam-packed with it! Treat yourself to some fresh fruit like oranges and grapefruit or some nourishing veg like broccoli and kale. Your body will thank you!

2. Manuka Honey

With its natural antiseptic and antimicrobial properties, honey is one of the oldest known antibiotics! Manuka honey has the added benefit of containing the most powerful bacteria-killing properties of all honey. Manuka honey is produced by bees pollinating Manuka flowers, which have been used in traditional herbal medicine throughout history to remedy congestion, respiratory issues, and colds. Manuka honey provides that double hit of honey and Manuka flower to keep us feeling our best this cold and flu season.

3. Zinc

A slightly lesser-known cold and flu-fighting mineral is zinc! Zinc proves time and time again that it’s effective at shortening the length of colds and the flu, as well as improving symptoms. Zinc supports our entire immune system and helps fight both bacterial and viral infections. Sources of zinc include grass-fed meats, shellfish, nuts and seeds, and legumes.

4. Fermented Foods

Did you know your gut health is directly related to your immune system!? Fermented foods are often easier to digest which takes the burden off our digestive tract and they supply us with beneficial bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics help us modulate inflammation, and lessen symptoms when we’re sick. Some probiotics have even been shown to help fight viruses! Some all-time fermented food favorites include sauerkraut, kimchi, tempeh, and sugar-free yogurt.

5. Bone Broth

One of my all-time favorite foods to eat when I’m sick is bone broth . Not only is it warming, and comforting, but it’s easy on the digestive tract and packed full of healing nutrients. When we’re sick the body is put in a nutrient deficiency because it’s allocating other resources to help fight the infection. Bone broth helps us restore these nutrients, allowing us to recover more quickly! Warm bone broth is also a nice way to soothe the throat, and ease some internal discomfort that comes along with cold and flu. In addition to vitamins and minerals, bone broth is a great way to get our protein in when we’re feeling unwell. Another major component of bone broth is collagen, a protein responsible for ensuring our cells repair from damage and our gut absorbs nutrients. Collagen also plays a role in controlling inflammation and helps ease body aches and pains!

6. Veggies & Leafy Greens

As you may have noticed there’s a trend here, get more nutrients! When we’re sick the body is working on overdrive to get us well again and one of the best ways to support it is through whole foods. Veggies are a great source of the vitamins and minerals we need during this time. Lightly cook veggies or add them into a soup for a gentle nutrient boost. Try this nourishing and restorative veggie soup , and for added protein and collagen use bone broth as your base!

7. Lemon Water

Although one of the most underrated healing tools we have, water is so important for kicking sickness to the curb! The body uses water for every metabolic process and when we’re sick a whole lot is going on that we need water for! Lemon water has the added benefit of antioxidants, natural electrolytes, powerful detoxing properties, and liver support. Whenever we’re sick the liver is impacted, so supporting it through hydration and antioxidants is so important! Another use for lemon water when we’re sick is a warm lemon-water-salt gargle. The warm lemon-water helps soothe sore throats by lowering inflammation while the salt helps flush out harmful bacteria.

Bonus tip!

Spend some time on stress management . The immune system doesn’t differentiate between physical and emotional stress and prolonged exposure to stress hormones weaken our immune system. When the immune system is weakened we are much more likely to get sick and have a much harder time recovering. Even during busy times, remind yourself of the importance of slowing down and relaxing. Try a yoga class or go for walk outside, spend time with loved ones or some much needed alone time! Whatever helps you unwind, dedicate some time to it, your immune system will thank you.

Good luck out there with cold and flu season! Nothing is worse than a poorly timed cold or flu, but with these tips, I’m confident you will fight them off quickly and easily. Just remember nutrients, nutrients, nutrients, and a little bit of relaxation, your immune system will take care of the rest!


6 Ways You Can Help Others During the Coronavirus Crisis

Including ideas that don't require leaving the house.

As COVID-19 continues to spread across the country and world, many of us are feeling some stress and a sense of helplessness about the situation. But one of my favorite coping mechanisms—you know, besides the stress baking—is to remember that there are still ways we can help one another during these uncertain times. As we know by now, the best way to help slow down the spread of the virus or "flatten the curve" is to stay home and practice social distancingਊs much as possible. While it may not feel like sitting on our sofas, washing our hands, and disinfecting everything in sight is a heroic act, it&aposs the best way to protect ourselves and those who are most vulnerable in our communities right now.

Looking for another way to help out? Check out the seven ideas below, most which don&apost require leaving the house at all.

As you're stocking up on pasta, frozen veggies, and endless rolls of toilet paper, consider those who either can't afford to buy lots of groceries all at once or who are physically unable to go to the store. Now's a great time to donate supplies or money to food pantries. Luckily, many large organizations, such as Feeding America, actually prefer money donations, which can be made online or over the phone, so you can contribute to the cause without leaving your house.

If you'd prefer to donate to your local food bank, give them a quick call first (or check their website) to see if it's better to donate money or supplies. When I called my neighborhood food pantry, I was surprised that they asked for items rather than money, but this may help smaller organizations skip the step of shopping for supplies. It's also a good idea to ask if there's anything specific, like toilet paper or cleaning supplies, that they may need more of right now.

Consider donating to Meals on Wheels, which delivers both hot and frozen meals to seniors across the country. Some areas may also be in need of more volunteers to help deliver meals, so if you're interested, talk to your local program.


7 Ways to Survive and Thrive at a Startup

As one of TheLadders' original 20 employees, I know first-hand how rewarding and challenging a job at a startup can be, especially when you're new to the workforce. Play your cards right and you will learn more in one year than your friends will pick up in five or more working at larger, more traditional organizations.

The media likes to sensationalize the perks and fun of working at a startup, but startup life is no day at the beach. You'll find that most operate with a "work hard, play hard" mentality. While you'll enjoy plenty of happy hours and ping pong tournaments, you'll also find the work intensely demanding -- likely, far more than anything you've previously experienced.

Here are seven tips I've learned over the years to help you not only survive, but thrive at a startup:

1. Embrace the mission.
The most successful entrepreneurs are incredibly passionate about their work. It's the fire in their bellies that drives them to succeed. Similarly, if you're going to commit to working at a startup, you have to believe in its mission. Look for organizations that are doing something you're interested in. You won't make it at a business if you're not genuinely excited about the work.

2. Acknowledge the long hours -- and accept them.
If you're going to make it in the startup world, you first need to acknowledge that the hours will be long. The second step is to accept this fact. In the beginning, it wasn't unusual for my team to work more than twelve hours a day or come in over the weekend to meet our goals. In a startup, there's always more work to be done and not enough people to take it on. You're not hanging around the office for the sake of face time -- there's work to be done. Accept this fact and you're already in better shape.

3. Set expectations with loved ones.
Not everyone in your circle of friends will understand or appreciate the commitment a startup demands. It's very important to set expectations with your loved ones. Nothing is worse than having your family call at 5:30 p.m. to ask how your day went when your work day is far from over. To avoid these frustrations, set expectations up front such as when people can reach you and through what forms of communication.

4. Take initiative.
On my first day, I was handed my computer in its box and a small packet containing basic instructions for using the company's systems and handling customer service inquiries. That day I learned two things: 1) How to set up a desktop computer on my own, and 2) that if I wanted to make it at this company, I would need to take initiative. Don't expect your company to have it all figured out already a startup is often still establishing its guidelines and formalizing its business. That's one of the reasons why the work is both exciting and scary. Instead of shying away, embrace the chaos and take an active role in shaping the business.

5. Fill in the blanks.
In startup land, priorities and projects can change overnight. Communicate openly and often to avoid confusion. Check in regularly with your team to ensure that everyone is on the same page and working toward the same goal. If you're unsure if a certain task is being taken care of, speak up! Don't assume someone else is working on it. It's better to over-communicate than let something important slip through the cracks.

6. Strive for balance.
I won't lie and say that it's easy to strike the right balance between work and play, but thanks to mobile technology, it's easier than ever before. Identify what matters most to you and look for creative ways to make time for those priorities. For instance, find out if you can work from home on certain evenings so you can eat dinner with your loved ones and still make the standing 8 p.m. conference call with your colleagues. Alternatively, take advantage of mobile apps like FaceTime that allow you to remain connected to your family while putting in long hours at the office.

7. Know when to take a breather.
The job will be stressful at times. That's why it's important to know when to walk away from the laptop so you can come back with a fresh set of eyes. Find an outlet for your stress, whether it's banging on a drum set, meditating for ten minutes in the back of the office or playing a game of darts with a colleague. Recharge your batteries and come back ready to tackle the latest challenge head-on with a fresh perspective.

Take these tips to heart, and you'll be prepared to tackle the hard work involved in a startup &ndash and reap the benefits of the enriching experience.


When Life Hands You Kidney Stones.

And as the saying goes, "make lemonade." It's important to consider dietary remedies alongside prescription medications.

Next time you drive past a lemonade stand, consider your kidneys. Chronic kidney stones are often treated with an alkali (less acidic) citrate, such as potassium citrate to help prevent certain stones, if urine citrate is low and urine pH levels are too low (or too acidic). Citrus juices do contain citrate (citric acid), but large amounts might be needed. Also, be careful of sugar. Lemon juice concentrate (4 oz per day) mixed with water can be considered. Alkali citrate can be prescribed and is available over-the-counter. Alkali citrate can be given with a mineral(s), such as sodium, potassium or magnesium to help prevent stone formation. The aim is to increase urine citrate (for prevention of calcium stones) and increase urine pH (or make urine less acidic or more alkaline, for prevention of uric acid and cystine stones). The goal is to keep pH in balance. Speak with a doctor or other healthcare professional about which treatment options are right for you, including over-the-counter products and home remedies. People with kidney disease may need to watch their intake of sodium, potassium or other minerals, depending on the stage of kidney disease or other factors.


1. Satchels for Survival

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The power grid has collapsed. Supermarkets are looted. With the city teetering on the brink of collapse, the first thing you want to reach for — after the Xanax — is a well-stocked “bug out” bag.

These suddenly chic survival satchels, also known as go bags, are typically lightweight military-grade backpacks stocked with provisions for at least 72 hours. Ready-made bug-out bags containing staples like water purification tablets, a 20-hour body warmer and a multifunction shovel are available on Amazon for under $200.

Hard-core preppers, however, would never leave their survival up to a mouse click, which is why some sites suggest endless creative tweaks to the standard equipment. Graywolf Survival recommends a chain-saw blade stashed in an Altoids tin to harvest firewood. Survival Life touts feminine hygiene products, even for men, to soak up blood from wounds.

“As long as the gear gets the job done, that’s what matters,” said Andrew Pontius, a marketing consultant and disaster preparedness instructor in Kansas City, Mo., who helps run a site called Bug Out Bag Academy.


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you might not be a great cook however you are a Great Home Economist, I love you . Daddy

MY NAME IS DEANNA AND I WAS JUST GUESSING DO YOU LIVE IN THE EAST COAST? THE REASON I ASKED IS I LIVED IN UPSTATE NY AND SHOPPED AT ALDI TOO. I WAS ABLE TO SAVE MONEY AT THAT STORE AND I LOVED IT THERE- I LOVED HOW YOU DID ALL THIS-THAT’S A LOT OF PEOPLE TO FEED AND THIS IS SO VERY HELPFUL-I JUST WISH I COULD HAVE AFFORDED THE INTERNET AT THE TIME. I WOULD HAVE LOVED THIS THEN. WE JUST RECENTLY MOVED TO THE VERY BEAUTIFUL SUNNY STATE OF ARIZONA- WE WERE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO GET A VERY GOOD DEAL ON A BEAUTIFUL HOME -WE LIVED IN AN APARTMENT THERE FOR 12 YEARS. WE MOVED FROM HERE 12 YEARS AGO THINKING NY WAS GOING TO BE OUR IN OUR FUTURE WHEN WE MET WE FELL IN LOVE AND I MOVED TO NY WHERE HE WAS FROM AND WE TALKED ABOUT STARTING A FAMILY AND WANTED A LITTLE GIRL AND THAT’S WHAT WE WERE BLESSED WITH- SO LONG STORY SHORT WE LOVED NY, BUT LIKE I SAID WE SAVED AND WAS ABLE TO COME BACK TO AZ SO THAT’S WHAT WE WERE ABLE TO GET A LITTLE BIT OF SOMETHING WE ALL WANTED A 2 STORY VAULTED CEILING ,POOL ,WITH YARD AND WE SO LOVE IT HERE. SO ANYWAYS HERE WE HAVE FOUND OUT HOW TO ALSO DO THIS, I DON’T KNOW IF YOU HAVE ANY FOOD CITY’S IN YOUR AREA BUT YOU WOULD BRING THAT AMOUNT OF YOUR DOWN EVEN MORE IF YOU DID. ALL YOUR PRODUCE IS VERY CHEAP 3 POUNDS OF BANANAS FOR 1.00, 3POUNDS OF CARROTS 1.00- 3POUNDS- 5 POUNDS-1.00 OR EVEN LESS AT TIMES THEY HAVE A 10 POUND BAG .26 CENTS- YOU CAN ALSO BUY RICE 3 POUNDS FOR 1.00 AND NO IT’S NOT A DOLLAR STORE BUT MOST OF THE PRODUCE IS VERY CHEAP- 4OR5 CUCUMBERS FOR 99 CENTS- YOU CAN ALSO GO ON CERTAIN DAYS AND GET 2 WHOLE CHICKEN FOR 60 CENTS A POUND. CHICKEN LEG MEAT FOR 34 CENTS A POUND. SO THIS IS WHERE WE GET THAT-THEN WE SAVED AND INVESTED $100.00 IN SAM’S CLUB MEMBERSHIP AND FOR EVERY 500.00 YOU SPEND YOU GET 10.00 IN CASH BACK TO SAVE OR TO SPEND WHEN YOU NEED IT- WE HAVE OUR DAUGHTER PICK HER SNACKS FOR THE MONTH AND WE BUY THEM IN BULK BECAUSE SHE EATS ABOUT 10 TIMES A DAY WITH MEALS AND SNACKS AND SHE IS VERY ATHLETIC AND BURNS IT FAST- SO WITH THE FISH THEY HAVE LIKE SALMON OMG THE SLAB OF SALMON THEY HAVE FOR 12.00-14.00 YOU CAN CUT AND MAKE 4 MEALS FOR US – YOU I AM NOT SURE-BUT WE ARE ABLE TO MAKE IT THREW THE MONTH THIS WAY. AS WELL AS WE BUY ALL THE HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS THERE SO THAT CUTS DOWN THE MONTHLY SPENDING IN THOSE ITEMS -SO WE CAN BUY THE MEAT THAT IS BIGGER AND COST MORE AND THE START INPLEMENTING THE HEALTHY FOODS- WE AS WELL ARE ABLE TO SOON BUY THE NINJA JUICER THERE WHICH WILL HELP US PUT ALL THE HEALTHY STUFF IN THAT FROM KALE-TO SEEDS AND SPIN AND SRIN AND DRINK AND HAVE ALL THE HEALTHY THINGS THE BODY NEEDS TO LIVE A LONG LIFE-FRY’S HAS THERE OWN PACKAGING OF MEATS AND THEY ARE A MUCH BETTER QUALITY THAN WALMART WITH THERE MEATS COMING PRE PACKAGED WHICH IS NOT A GOOD DEAL.THERE’S NO SALE THERE. FRY’S MEATS ARE DEEP COLOR OF MEAT THEY NEED TO BE. THIS HAS SAVED ME HUGE AMOUNT OF MONEY AND THE FOOD LASTS ALL MONTH NOW AND WE DON’T NEED TO GO TO ANY FOOD PANTRIES ANYMORE. THERE IS PLENTY OF FOOD LEFT OVER IN THE FREEZER AND FRIDGE AND PANTRY- WE BUILD ON ALL OUR SPICES,ALL THE HEALTHY STUFF LIKE THE BASICS -SPICE-BEANS,RICE WHOLE WHEAT,FISH, FRESH VEGGIES AND WHEN THE FRUIT IS NOT ON SALE WE BUY THE BIG FROZEN FRUIT MIXES. BUT FOOD CITY ALWAYS HAS APPLES,PINEAPPLE ON SALE.SO MAYBE THIS CAN HELP YOU IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THESE STORES AND IT WILL HELP YOU AS WELL CUT DOWN EVEN MORE ON YOU 300.00 A MONTH IT DID ME.SO I JUST WANTED TO SHARE WITH YOU- I HOPE YOU ARE WELL AND THE KIDS ARE DOING WONDERFUL-STAY WARM.. DD

Well, I am a Home Economist, with a degree from UT. ( Now they call it Human Ecology… I love that don’t you? ) I cannot tell you how impressed I am with your planning and execution skills. Your dealing with life as it comes at you amazes me. While in college, a hundred years ago, I had to live in a ‘home management house’ for one semester and had to take on the duties of a homemaker… making meal plans for 8 that had to come within 50 cents either way of my budgeted meal plan. I only had to do this for a few weeks out of one semester, and it was not at all easy. My hat is definitely off to you!

I just wanted to tell you how much I really enjoyed stumbling upon you during one of my Pinterest momments (You know, you stare at your phone for an hour ignoring the loud crashing sounds and screaming of the kids?)
Anyway, I just love how real your breakdown is and that you showed a menu based on WIC included. It’s very comforting to find a real life budget. I’ve spent quite a bit of time trying to find budgets that make sense for our family and they all seem unrealistic.
I have 4 children myself (6,2,1 and a month old) My husband works nights and I work days so we avoid the years worth of pay and sacrifice to the gods it takes to pay for childcare.
I have to go back to work FT shortly due to unfortunate unseen circumstances with part of my husbands income Finding real life ways to budget are very refreshing.

This is so brilliant and I’m going to try to emulate this with our slightly smaller family…


7 Survival Foods The Pioneers Ate That You Wouldn’t Recognize

Food has long been a focus of society. While our modern way of life includes regular trips to the grocery store, where there is more variety than we know what to do with, our ancestors didn’t have it quite that easy. We are literally only a few generations away from a time in which people hoarded their food, both on the westward trail and in their root cellars, just to make sure they would make it through winter.

Other than the last century or so, the need to stockpile food has been the main effort of people the world over. With harvest times coming only once a year, the size of the harvest and how well it was preserved determined whether the next year would be one of lack or plenty. When drought occurred, it would be a serious enough event to destroy villages, major cities and even entire cultures.

Going west, a Conestoga wagon or a converted farm wagon made into a prairie schooner was mostly filled with food, as well as other necessities. While some families started out with expensive furniture in their wagons, that was soon left by the wayside, lightening the load, so they could keep their all-important food. A typical load of food would consist of the following for each adult in the family. Similar provisions for children would be brought along, with the quantities adjusted for their size.

  • 200 pounds of flour (could be any type of flour, not just wheat flour)
  • 30 pounds of pilot bread (otherwise known as hardtack)
  • 2 pounds of saleratus (baking soda)
  • 10 pounds of salt
  • Half a bushel of corn meal
  • Half a bushel of parched and ground corn
  • 25 pounds of sugar
  • 10 pounds of rice
  • 75 pounds of bacon
  • 5 pounds of coffee
  • 2 pounds of tea
  • Half a bushel of dried beans
  • 1 bushel of dried fruit
  • A small keg of vinegar

Once leaving Independence, Missouri, there would be little chance of resupply. That food would have to last them, augmented by whatever they could hunt and any berries they could find. While there were a few military posts with Sutler’s stores (general stores that provided the military), they were few and far between.

So, what did our ancestors do with this and what did they really eat? Well, a lot of it would seem rather normal to us, but there was also a lot that was not normal. Some things that we wouldn’t even recognize. However, it all had one thing in common: Food that the pioneers ate had to be non-perishable, as they had no way of refrigerating it.

1. Buffalo, bear, cougar and squirrel

One of the easiest ways for pioneers to restock or stretch their food supplies was to hunt. Hunting provided them with fresh meat, something they had no chance of bringing with them. But that meant they ate whatever they could find. Crossing the Great Plains, buffalo were common, so they were eaten. When they got into the mountains of Colorado, Wyoming and points west, the buffalo were replaced by bear, cougar and deer. They would even eat squirrels, if they couldn’t find anything else.

Jim Bridger, the mountain man, claimed that cougar meat was the best there was. While cougars weren’t anywhere near as common as deer, when one came along, it was often eat or be eaten. You’d better be quick with your rifle, or you just might end up as dinner.

Shooting a squirrel was difficult, as the size of the bullet would destroy much of the usable meat. They didn’t have .22 caliber rifles back then. So instead of shooting the squirrel, they’d “bark it” by shooting the bark of the tree, just beneath it. This would knock the squirrel off the tree, unconscious, saving the meat.

2. The insides of the animals, too

They couldn’t afford to let anything go to waste. So, it wasn’t unusual for pioneers to eat parts of the animal which we would turn our noses up at. Brain, heart, tongue, liver and even intestines were eaten, often cut up and put in something.

This practice is still common in much of the world today. While we don’t eat much other than the muscles of the animals, in Mexico they eat the tongue, cheek meat, heart, liver, intestines and stomach. Some of these are used for special recipes, which are considered near delicacies by the Mexicans.

3. Frying pan bread

Baking bread on the trail was nearly impossible, so instead, they made frying pan bread. This was basically biscuits, cooked in a frying pan, rather than in an oven. Biscuits and bacon were one of the staples of the trail.

While you might think that breads are breads, breads were much different back then. You might not recognize them for what they were. First of all, most flour was whole grain, not our white pastry flour. While white flour did exist, it wasn’t common, except in the larger cities.

They also didn’t have the same types of leaven that we have today. Most women “made” their own yeast, by leaving a container of “sourdough starter” open for bacteria to invade it. This would then be saved, allowing them to make bread every day.

But these breads were much heavier and heartier than the breads we know today. A loaf of bread on the frontier probably weighed two to three pounds, even though it was smaller than our common one pound loaf. But that bread stuck with you longer, providing more nutrition and calories than our modern breads do.

4. Salt pork

While bacon was the most common preserved meat they’d eat, those in the military usually had to make do with salt pork. This is much like bacon, but without as much meat. Essentially, a piece of salt pork is a chunk of fat, with a little pork meat running through it. Soldiers would be issued salt pork as their version of combat rations, whenever they were on the move. They’d slice it and fry it, eating it with pan bread.

5. Yucca root

The root of the yucca plant is something like a potato. As the southwest was settled, this became a staple for many of the people, as the land was already littered with yucca plants. Tougher than our potato, and more fibrous, it was nevertheless a good source of carbohydrates. Cut up and boiled in water, it would soften up and make a great filler for soups and stews.

6. Pine nuts

The pine cone we know so well really isn’t the seed of the pine tree, but rather the husk for that seed. Hidden deep within its many scales are pine nuts, which are the seeds. These can be removed by simply banging the pine cone upside-down on a hard surface.

Pine nuts can be eaten raw, or toasted, much like many other nuts. They have a distinct, but pleasant flavor. Like many nuts, they are an excellent source of fats, which they needed. Little of what they ate had much in the way of fats in it. Wild animals don’t grow anywhere near the amount of fat that our domesticated animals do, and they couldn’t go to the store for a bottle of cooking oil.

7. Acorn bread

Acorns, the seeds of the oak tree, are plentiful in some parts of the country. A seed, they are much like many other nuts. Gathered, they can be roasted to dry them and then ground, making flour out of it. Like the flour of any other grain, this can then be turned into bread. For some pioneers who didn’t have access to resupplies of wheat flour, acorn bread and cornbread were the only breads they had available.

What would you add to our list? Share your knowledge in the section below:


Watch the video: Die 7 Wege zur Effektivität - DAP 70 (October 2021).