Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Stock Your Pantry: Spices

Stock Your Pantry: Spices

Our compilation of spices that every cook needs in their kitchen to create the basics, and infuse your food with lots of flavor.

If you’ve had your spices for over two years, or they are no longer fragrant, it is time to replace them. Spices are best stored in a cold and dark place.

Essentials:

  • Dried Bay Leaves
  • Black peppercorns – choose whole and then grind it fresh when you need it
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Chili Powder
  • Cinnamon
  • Cloves
  • Cumin
  • Madras Curry Powder
  • Dry Mustard
  • Nutmeg – best to choose whole nutmegs and grate it fresh when needed for maximum flavor
  • Dried Oregano
  • Smoked and Sweet Paprika
  • Red Pepper Flakes
  • Thyme
  • Vanilla Extract

Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.


Shop for peace-of-mind — these ingredients will last for a while.

Fridge:

Eggs can be eaten at every meal (and as snacks). They are protein powerhouses and will last up to 5 weeks from purchase date — store them on the bottom shelf of your fridge for best food-safety practices. Try making: Bacon and Egg Spaghetti for dinner, bake a breakfast casserole inspired by eggs Benedict or use your air fryer to hard boil half a dozen at one time.

Organic milk isn’t just a fancy option. Organic milk often has a much longer shelf life than non-organic. That's thanks to the bacteria-killing process of ultrapasteurization (milk is heated at a much higher temperature for less time than the more common pasteurization process). Unopened ultrapasteurized organic milk has a shelf life of 40 to 60 days compared to 15 to 17 days for regular pasteurized. You can stock up, but be sure to drink within 10 days of opening a carton.

Store-bought pickled foods often have long refrigerator shelf lives: an opened jar of pickles can hang out for up to 1 year. The same goes for most of your pickled favorites like string beans, okra and beets — all because of the highly acidic brine they're stored in. Also consider kimchi, which can store (after opening) for up to 8 months. Use some to make kimchi fried rice for dinner.

Certain fruits and vegetables can really cozy up in the produce drawer — carrots and beets last a long time. Be sure the cook their tops relatively soon after buying (or else they'll go slimy). Try sauteed beet greens and carrot-top pesto. Apples are all-stars up to 2 months in the fridge. Citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges and clementines can keep for several weeks.

Pantry:

Stored in a cool and dry place rice will keep indefinitely. Pair with beans to make a complete-protein meal like red beans and rice.

Dried beans are packed with fiber and protein making them super filling, and they will last for quite a while in your pantry. Try them for breakfast on toast or make an Instant Pot black bean soup for lunch and dinner.

An unopened bag of dried pasta can last up to a couple years — after opening, keep stored in an airtight container in a cool and dark place. Enjoy the full spectrum of pasta shapes from wagon wheels to pappardelle.

Keep popcorn kernels on hand for a stove-top snack. Try popping them in extra-virgin coconut oil or sprinkle with nutritional yeast for extra flavor during movie time. Make your own special popcorn seasoning like pizza-flavored option.

Powdered milk will keep for a long time as long as it’s stored in a cool and dry place. Use it in a pinch for soups, desserts and baked goods.

Oats (steel cut, rolled and instant) will keep indefinitely if stored airtight in a cool and dry place. They're not just for breakfast (though these overnight oats are a time saver) you can also make "tortilla soup" oatmeal for dinner and a berry-studded oatmeal bake for dessert.

Dried lentils are packed with energizing B vitamins and satiating fiber. Consider making a French salad or curried lentil soup.

Honey has a low moisture content, meaning it lasts indefinitely and doesn’t really harbor bacteria. Keep jars on hand to sweeten everything from your coffee to yogurt. If it crystallizes, you can still eat it, or heat the jar slowly in simmering water until it’s liquified again.

There are so many vinegar flavors to choose from: a variety can make cooking more interesting, and they store indefinitely. Check out our vinegar 101 primer for a breakdown of types, along with the dishes they're best used in.