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Courgettes au gratin with Mornay sauce recipe

Courgettes au gratin with Mornay sauce recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes
  • Courgette side dishes

These delicious, rich courgettes are perfect as a dinner party starter or a side to accompany a meat dish. Be sure to use vegetarian Emmental cheese such as Président® (made with vegetarian rennet) for this to be a vegetarian dish!

15 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 2 courgettes, washed and thinly sliced
  • 40g butter
  • 50g plain flour
  • 500ml milk
  • 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 50g grated Emmental cheese

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:45min

  1. In a saucepan melt butter over low heat and add flour. Whisk well and cook for a few minutes, then add milk, stirring. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper and cook for about 5 minutes, until mixture thickens.
  2. Preheat oven to 200 C / Gas 6; meanwhile, divide the courgette slices between four 10cm round mini tart tins or gratin dishes.
  3. Remove sauce from heat and stir in the grated cheese. Mix well and pour the sauce over courgettes, distributing evenly.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes or until surface is slightly browned; serve hot.

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Greek Moussaka With Zucchini Recipe

Layers of zucchini, meat sauce, cheese, and a creamy béchamel create a fabulous oven-to-table casserole. Select mature zucchini or Italian squash (they look like large zucchini) for best results.


Moussaka
is traditionally served in very large pieces and it is a heavy dish. Serve with a green salad, crusty bread, and a dry red wine. If anyone has room for dessert, a fruit sorbet or cheese with fruit is a light way to end on a sweet note.


Gratin de Chou-Fleur / Sauce Béchamel-Mornay

Ingrédients pour la Sauce Béchamel / Mornay:

  • 75g de beurre
  • 75g de farine
  • 1 l de lait entier porté à ébullition ou à température ambiante
  • sel et poivre
  • 1 pincée de noix de muscade
  • 1 bonne poignée de fromage râpé tel que du Gruyère, du Cheddar ou du Parmesan

Ingrédients pour le Gratin de Chou-Fleur:

Méthode pour la Sauce Béchamel :

Dans une casserole à hauts bords et assez large, faites fondre le beurre puis une fois que celui-ci est bien chaud, ajoutez toute la farine d’un seul coup.

A l’aide d’un fouet, travaillez le « roux » et portez-le à ébullition 1 à 2 minutes pour ne pas garder un arrière-gout de farine. Le roux doit prendre une jolie couleur dorée-brune.

Commencez à incorporer le lait (chaud ou à température ambiante pour éviter le développement de grumeaux). Le roux va s’épaissir et prendre un aspect pâteux, continuez à incorporer doucement le lait et à le travailler au fouet pour que le lait s’intègre au roux.

Petit à petit, la préparation va se détendre et prendre un aspect uniforme. Plus vous ajouterez du lait, plus la Béchamel sera liquide. Ajoutez plus ou moins de lait selon la consistance désirée. Pour le gratin, il faut que la Béchamel soit suffisamment liquide pour bien couvrir le chou-fleur.

Assaisonnez de sel, poivre et noix de muscade. Si vous ajoutez du fromage après, réduisez la quantité de sel.

Portez la Béchamel a ébullition 3 à 4 minutes en remuant constamment.

Gardez de côté jusqu’à utilisation. Couvrez de film transparent à contact si elle ne doit pas être utilisée dans l’heure sinon, une croûte se formera à la surface.

Méthode pour le Gratin de Chou-Fleur:

Si vous le souhaitez, vous pouvez ajoutez du fromage à la Béchamel pour en faire une Sauce Mornay. Tant que la Béchamel est chaude, incorporez-le jusqu’à ce qu’il ait totalement fondu.

Faites cuire le chou-fleur dans une grande casserole d’eau bouillante et salée. Le chou-fleur est cuit lorsque vous pouvez le percer avec un couteau sans résistance.

Egouttez-les et garder les de côté jusqu’au moment de l’assemblage.

Préchauffez votre four à 200 °C.

Si votre Sauce est prête, versez une généreuse cuillère de service au fond d’un plat a gratin.

Versez le chou-fleur sur cette Sauce et recouvrez avec le reste de la sauce. Le chou-fleur doit être bien enrobé de sauce et uniformément réparti dans le plat.

Faites cuire le gratin au four 15-20 minutes, jusqu’à ce que le gratin prenne une jolie coloration brune en surface.

Servez tout de suite avec une bonne salade verte ou en accompagnement d’une viande, d’un poisson.


  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 yellow pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for greasing
  • 1 onion, peeled and chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • 390g carton Sainsbury's premium chopped tomatoes
  • ½ tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 150ml Sainsbury's white cooking wine
  • 3 medium courgettes, cut into ½ cm-thick rounds on the diagonal
  • 2 small aubergines, cut into ½ cm-thick rounds
  • 120g Soignon goats' cheese, cut into ½ cm-thick rounds
  • 50g stale bread, torn into chunks
  • 20g parmesan, finely grated
  • Few sprigs fresh flat leaf parsley, leaves picked and roughly torn

Preheat the oven to 180°C, fan 160°C, gas mark 4. Place the peppers on an oiled roasting tray.

While the oven is heating up, put the peppers in for about 20 minutes until soft. Remove from the oven and leave until cool enough to handle. Slice into thick slices, discarding the stalk, skin and seeds, and set aside.

Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a large, heavy-based pan. Add the onion, garlic and oregano and cook until soft. Add the tomatoes, vinegar and wine. Season. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Heat a non-stick griddle pan until hot. Grill the courgettes, aubergines and peppers in batches until grill lines appear.

Layer the vegetables in a 1.5-litre ovenproof dish with the tomato sauce and sliced goats' cheese.

Whiz the bread and parmesan with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and the parsley in a food processor until coarsely chopped and sprinkle over the layered vegetables.

Bake in the oven for 20-30 minutes until cooked through.

Cook's tip: Make this tasty bake in advance then pop in the freezer for an easy supper when you have no time. To freeze: Prepare up to and including step 6. Chill the unbaked dish and then freeze. Thaw completely and bake for 20-30 minutes until golden.

* Please note, this recipe is not suitable for vegetarians as it contains parmesan.


Mornay Sauce

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup diced onion
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 Tbs all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 black peppercorns
  • 4 whole cloves
  • Freshly grated nutmeg
  • Freshly ground black pepper or white pepper, if available
  • 1/3 cup grated Gruyere cheese or other strong cheese, such as Parmesan, Comte, or Emmental

Instructions

Ingredient discussion:

The flavorings are subtle: onion, nutmeg, clove, bay, and pepper.

We’d recommend that you use organic milk and half-and-half when you can (we don’t always). Why? If you compare the ingredients list for organic and non-organic, you’ll find that the non-organic has things other than milk and cream. Things like Sodium Citrate and Disodium Phosphate. We don’t think these are needed in Mornay sauce.

Oh, the onions, bay leaf, cloves, and peppercorns are there to add some flavoring to your Mornay sauce. You could add other flavorings, too. Perhaps garlic, or a pinch of curry powder, depending on how you plan to use the sauce.

Procedure in detail:

No need to buy a special heat diffuser if you already have a heavy-bottomed skillet (or griddle, as shown here).

Construct heat diffuser. So, what’s a heat diffuser? It’s simply a metal disk or rectangle that you put between the burner and the pan. It helps to spread the heat evenly across the bottom of the pan, eliminating hot spots where the sauce will stick and burn. Now, you could buy one, but, we bet that you already have a heat diffuser in your house: a heavy-bottomed skillet! Simply place a heavy-bottomed skillet on the burner and set your saucepan on top! Turn the burner to medium, add the butter, and wait until it melts.

Try not to let the onions brown just cook them until they begin to get soft.

Cook onions. Add the onions and cook, stirring or shaking the pan often so the onions don’t brown, until they’re turning translucent, about 3 minutes. You don’t want the onions to brown for this sauce it’s a white sauce, so no browning.

Stir the flour continuously so that it doesn’t have a chance to brown.

Cook flour. Once the onions are cooked a bit, add the flour and cook, stirring continuously, for about 2 minutes more. Again, don’t let the flour stick or brown. Not even a little brown.

Add dairy and simmer. Pour in the milk and half-and-half, and whisk into the flour mixture (basically, a roux). Continue heating, whisking often, until the sauce thickens slightly and comes to a simmer.

Add seasonings. Once simmering, add bay leaf, cloves, and peppercorns. If needed, lower the heat slightly and move the saucepan over to one side of the heat diffuser to keep it barely simmering.

Simmer the sauce with the seasonings for 30 minutes to thicken and infuse with flavor.

Simmer. Allow the sauce to simmer for 30 minutes, whisking fairly often to ensure that it isn’t sticking to the bottom of the pan. The heat diffuser really helps by preventing those hot spots where the sauce would start to stick. After 30 minutes, remove from heat.

Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper to match your taste.

Adjust seasonings. Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper to taste. Fresh nutmeg is quite assertive, so make sure to use just a pinch. Ideally, you want just a hint of nutmeg to compliment the other flavors.

Mornay sauce is smooth, so strain out all those onions and spices. After all, who wants lumpy cheese sauce?

Strain. Strain the sauce through a fine mesh strainer to remove and discard the onion bits, the peppercorns, any lumps of flour, and so on. Do this while the sauce is still hot, so it’ll melt the cheese in the next step.

We used a mix of Gruyere and Parmesan cheese. Press plastic wrap on the surface to prevent a skin from forming.

Whisk in cheese. Add the cheese and whisk until smooth. You can now use the sauce immediately, or you can save it for a few days by placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface (to prevent a skin from forming) and refrigerating. When needed, reheat gently, adding a bit of milk, if needed, to thin.

Tomorrow we’ll show you what we did with some of our sauce — it’s a traditional use for Mornay sauce, but one we didn’t think of until we had this dish when we were in San Francisco. We will say that this Mornay sauce was a bit more trouble than what we normally make it, but we’ll also say that it was better-tasting all around. We think that this might become our standard version of Mornay sauce, and we’ll definitely make it for those special dishes. Five stars.

Worth the trouble?

Courgettes Frites

Ingredients

  • 1 medium zucchini cut into French fry shaped pieces
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 1/2 cups bread crumbs
  • olive oil
  • Finely grated Parmesan for garnish, optional
  • Fresh parsley finely chopped (for garnish, optional)

Instructions

Ingredient discussion:

We make our own bread crumbs, of course. It’s not difficult: Just take some day-old bread, cut it into small cubes, and bake for 15 to 20 minutes while something else is baking. Turn into crumbs either by pulsing in a food processor or placing in a large plastic bag and crushing with a rolling pin. Egg, free range is the way to go. Olive oil, we use it here, but any light, neutral oil will work. Basil and oregano are really suggestions. We used them because the original recipe called for Italian seasoning (is it made from Italians?), but we think that other spices would work well, too. Curry fries, anyone?

Procedure in detail:

Preheat oven to 425°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment or silicone baking mats.

We used oregano and basil, but other spices would be good, too. Use your imagination to make these your special fries.

Season fries. Place the zucchini strips in a large bowl and toss with salt, basil, and oregano. Try to get the sticks coated as best you can.

Once seasoned, coat with flour. Yes, you’ll toss some of that flour, but it will allow the coating to crisp. It’s worth it!

Add flour. The flour is going to act as a barrier between the liquid of the zucchini and the outer coating, which will get crispy, so add the flour. It might seem like too much, but in this case you’re better off with more flour than too little. Toss until all the sticks are coated. Oh, just get in there with your hands and toss. Your hands will clean up nicely.

Beat egg and milk. Choose a wide, flat bowl, one that you’ll be able to get the fries into and out of easily. Whisk together the egg and milk we used a fork for this step. Put the bread crumbs in another similar dish.

Roll around in the crumbs to coat. Try using just one hand for the crumbs, the other for the egg wash. It’s less messy.

Dip and coat. Set up a little workstation with the fries, then the egg mix, then the crumbs, then the baking sheets, so you can work efficiently. Now for a trick. Try, try, as hard as you can to dip the zucchini stick into the egg wash with one hand, then transfer it to the bread crumbs with the same hand, then coat with crumbs and transfer to the baking sheet with the other hand. Why? It’s less messy. If you use both hands for each operation, you’ll get crumbs in the egg, and egg in the crumbs, and, before you know it, it’ll seem as if you just mixed everything together at the start.

Drizzle. Drizzle the fries with a bit of oil, which will help them crisp up and give them that deep fried crunch, without the hassle of deep frying. Yay!

Arrange the fries on the pan so they aren’t touching for maximum crisposity.

Bake. Slide into the oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, rotating the pans about halfway through to ensure even baking, until the outside coating is crispy and sizzling.

Serve immediately. Plate these and bring ’em out (garnishing if desired) before they get cold. We had a side of marinara sauce, so we didn’t bother with the garnish (besides, we didn’t have fresh parsley, either).

These were almost everything a zucchini fry should be: crisp on the outside, tender on the inside. Our only issue, and it’s a minor one, is that, as is, they lacked flavor. Next time, we’ll be adding seasoning to the bread crumbs: onion powder, a bit of garlic powder, maybe some celery seeds, possibly a bit of red pepper, because summer squash is bland and needs that extra kick in the pants. Otherwise, the coating is the real deal, light and crisp (we had also coated some with corn meal which worked nicely, too), reminding us of the coating that’s used on fried mozzarella sticks — and who doesn’t like fried cheese? We liked the coating so much that we might even consider using the same method when making fried okra. We could make a lot more at once in the oven. Four stars, until the coating is seasoned properly.

Worth the trouble?

Mornay Sauce

Ingredients

  • 3 Tbs unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup diced onion
  • Kosher salt
  • 3 Tbs all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup milk
  • 2 cups half-and-half
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 black peppercorns
  • 4 whole cloves
  • Freshly grated nutmeg
  • Freshly ground black pepper or white pepper, if available
  • 1/3 cup grated Gruyere cheese or other strong cheese, such as Parmesan, Comte, or Emmental

Instructions

Ingredient discussion:

The flavorings are subtle: onion, nutmeg, clove, bay, and pepper.

We’d recommend that you use organic milk and half-and-half when you can (we don’t always). Why? If you compare the ingredients list for organic and non-organic, you’ll find that the non-organic has things other than milk and cream. Things like Sodium Citrate and Disodium Phosphate. We don’t think these are needed in Mornay sauce.

Oh, the onions, bay leaf, cloves, and peppercorns are there to add some flavoring to your Mornay sauce. You could add other flavorings, too. Perhaps garlic, or a pinch of curry powder, depending on how you plan to use the sauce.

Procedure in detail:

No need to buy a special heat diffuser if you already have a heavy-bottomed skillet (or griddle, as shown here).

Construct heat diffuser. So, what’s a heat diffuser? It’s simply a metal disk or rectangle that you put between the burner and the pan. It helps to spread the heat evenly across the bottom of the pan, eliminating hot spots where the sauce will stick and burn. Now, you could buy one, but, we bet that you already have a heat diffuser in your house: a heavy-bottomed skillet! Simply place a heavy-bottomed skillet on the burner and set your saucepan on top! Turn the burner to medium, add the butter, and wait until it melts.

Try not to let the onions brown just cook them until they begin to get soft.

Cook onions. Add the onions and cook, stirring or shaking the pan often so the onions don’t brown, until they’re turning translucent, about 3 minutes. You don’t want the onions to brown for this sauce it’s a white sauce, so no browning.

Stir the flour continuously so that it doesn’t have a chance to brown.

Cook flour. Once the onions are cooked a bit, add the flour and cook, stirring continuously, for about 2 minutes more. Again, don’t let the flour stick or brown. Not even a little brown.

Add dairy and simmer. Pour in the milk and half-and-half, and whisk into the flour mixture (basically, a roux). Continue heating, whisking often, until the sauce thickens slightly and comes to a simmer.

Add seasonings. Once simmering, add bay leaf, cloves, and peppercorns. If needed, lower the heat slightly and move the saucepan over to one side of the heat diffuser to keep it barely simmering.

Simmer the sauce with the seasonings for 30 minutes to thicken and infuse with flavor.

Simmer. Allow the sauce to simmer for 30 minutes, whisking fairly often to ensure that it isn’t sticking to the bottom of the pan. The heat diffuser really helps by preventing those hot spots where the sauce would start to stick. After 30 minutes, remove from heat.

Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper to match your taste.

Adjust seasonings. Add nutmeg, salt, and pepper to taste. Fresh nutmeg is quite assertive, so make sure to use just a pinch. Ideally, you want just a hint of nutmeg to compliment the other flavors.

Mornay sauce is smooth, so strain out all those onions and spices. After all, who wants lumpy cheese sauce?

Strain. Strain the sauce through a fine mesh strainer to remove and discard the onion bits, the peppercorns, any lumps of flour, and so on. Do this while the sauce is still hot, so it’ll melt the cheese in the next step.

We used a mix of Gruyere and Parmesan cheese. Press plastic wrap on the surface to prevent a skin from forming.

Whisk in cheese. Add the cheese and whisk until smooth. You can now use the sauce immediately, or you can save it for a few days by placing a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface (to prevent a skin from forming) and refrigerating. When needed, reheat gently, adding a bit of milk, if needed, to thin.

Tomorrow we’ll show you what we did with some of our sauce — it’s a traditional use for Mornay sauce, but one we didn’t think of until we had this dish when we were in San Francisco. We will say that this Mornay sauce was a bit more trouble than what we normally make it, but we’ll also say that it was better-tasting all around. We think that this might become our standard version of Mornay sauce, and we’ll definitely make it for those special dishes. Five stars.

Worth the trouble?

Strained fish soup (Soupe de poisson)

From Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volumes I & II Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volumes I & II by Julia Child and Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck

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  • Categories: Soups Mediterranean
  • Ingredients: whole fish leeks spaghetti pasta tomatoes parsley bay leaves thyme saffron garlic fennel seeds dried orange peel
  • Accompaniments:Croûtes Garlic, pimiento, and chili pepper sauce (Rouille)

Garlic, pimiento, and chili pepper sauce (Rouille)

From Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volumes I & II Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volumes I & II by Julia Child and Louisette Bertholle and Simone Beck

Are you sure you want to delete this recipe from your Bookshelf. Doing so will remove all the Bookmarks you have created for this recipe.

  • Categories: Sauces for fish French
  • Ingredients: red peppers chiles potatoes garlic basil

Publishers Text

The perfect gift for any follower of Julia Child—and any lover of French food. This boxed set brings together Mastering the Art of French Cooking, first published in 1961, and its sequel, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume Two, published in 1970.

Volume One is the classic cookbook, in its entirety—524 recipes.
“Anyone can cook in the French manner anywhere,” wrote Mesdames Beck, Bertholle, and Child, “with the right instruction.” And here is the book that, for nearly fifty years, has been teaching Americans how.

Mastering the Art of French Cooking is for both seasoned cooks and beginners who love good food and long to reproduce at home the savory delights of the classic cuisine, from the historic Gallic masterpieces to the seemingly artless perfection of a dish of spring-green peas. The techniques learned in this beautiful book, with more than one hundred instructive illustrations, can be applied to recipes in all other French cookbooks, making them infinitely usable. In compiling the secrets of famous Cordon Bleu chefs, the authors produced a magnificent volume that continues to have a place of honor in American kitchens.

Volume Two is the sequel to the great cooking classic—with 257 additional recipes.
Following the publication of the celebrated Volume One, Julia Child and Simone Beck continued to search out and sample new recipes among the classic dishes and regional specialties of France—cooking, conferring, tasting, revising, perfecting. Out of their discoveries they made, for Volume Two, a brilliant selection of precisely those recipes that not only add to the repertory but, above all, bring the reader to a new level of mastery of the art of French cooking.

Each of these recipes is worked out step-by-step, with the clarity and precision that are the essence of the first volume. Five times as many drawings as in Volume One make the clear instructions even more so.

Perhaps the most remarkable achievement of this volume is that it will make Americans actually more expert than their French contemporaries in two supreme areas of cookery: baking and charcuterie. In France one can turn to the local bakery for fresh and expertly baked bread, or to neighborhood charcuterie for pâtés and terrines and sausages. Here, most of us have no choice but to create them for ourselves.
Bon appétit!


Watch the video: ZUCCHINI AND POTATO CASSEROLE. chessy baked potato and zucchini casserole recipe. zucchini gratin (October 2021).