Best March Wine Events

March is upon us, so keep your fingers crossed for a mild finish to winter, and an early start to spring. We are delighted to be returning to Washington, D.C., for our 2nd annual Around the World in 80 Sips event, and we can hardly contain our excitement for all the upcoming sip-worthy tastings this month.

BB&T Charleston Wine + Food Festival, Charleston, S.C., March 1-4

Support local charities and celebrate Charleston’s rich culture and Southern charm with a long weekend of wine and food events. The 21-and-older age requirement may not make for a family-friendly weekend, but the festival is an ideal destination for entertaining a date! Click here for tickets and information.

The 5th Annual New York Wine Expo, New York, March 2-4

Calling all wine lovers. The Expo’s Grand Tasting offers more than 600 wines made by over 150 winemakers from around the world. Don’t miss the educational seminars and guided tastings, ideal for both the novice wine drinker as well as the most seasoned connoisseur. Click here for tickets and information.

17th Annual Educational Taste of Excellence, Las Vegas, March 3

Hello, Las Vegas! This posh event requires elegant evening attire, and boasts more than 110 domestic and imported wines. Win big in Sin City during the silent and live auctions. Click here for tickets and information.

Walla Walla Wine, Seattle, March 12

Seattleites, prepare to transition from a rainbow of gray into a sunnier state of mind. More than 50 wineries will be pouring their most celebrated wines from Walla Walla Valley. Click here for tickets and information.

22nd Annual Savor Sonoma Valley, Kenwood, Calif., March 17-18

This premier event is in the heart of Sonoma featuring some of the most stunning views of wine country. Experience 21 wineries showcasing 2011 vintage wines, new releases, and culinary creations from local chefs and restaurants. Click here for tickets and information.

Spark Ventures 4th Annual Wine Tasting, Chicago, March 22

How do you say no to a spectacular cause, wine tasting, and silent auction? You can’t! Spark Ventures is hosting a stellar event in which guests taste great wines, listen to a live jazz trio, and participate in silent and live auctions. All the proceeds from this lovely event go to the expansion of Spark’s work in Zambia. Click here for tickets and information.

15th Annual Rhone Rangers Weekend, San Francisco, March 24-25

Fans of American Rhone wines, meet the largest American Rhone wine event in the country! Fans of bacon, sign up for the American Rhone wine and bacon seminar — everything is better with bacon! This two-day event features tastings, seminars, and dinner. Click here for tickets and information.

Around The World in 80 Sips™ Washington, D.C., March 30

Last year’s sold-out event returns to the DAR Constitution Hall, just two blocks from the White House! Why not expose your taste buds to wines from around the world in one of the most globally conscientious cities in America? Click here for tickets and information.

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El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


El Diablo

When most people think of classic tequila drinks, their mind probably goes to the Margarita first, maybe the Paloma second. They may never get to the El Diablo, but they should. This mid-century classic combines tequila with crème de cassis (a sweet blackcurrant liqueur), lime juice and ginger.

The recipe first appeared in print as the Mexican El Diablo in “Trader Vic’s Book of Food and Drink,” which was published in 1946 and lists Vic as the drink’s creator (later recipes shortened the name to El Diablo, as it’s been known since). That first recipe called for ginger ale, and you can opt for the gingery soda if you like. But ginger ale during this time period was spicier than most options available today, the former version having more in common with ginger beer. This recipe uses ginger beer to best recreate the cocktail’s traditional flavor.

The El Diablo offers another important choice beyond the bubbly topper. You can add all the ingredients into a shaker with ice and strain the contents into a glass, which supplies a gorgeous reddish-purple cocktail. Or you can build the drink in your glass, starting with the tequila and lime followed by the ginger beer, and then adding a float of cassis on top as the finishing touch. This construction creates a visually stunning cocktail with a richly colored halo on top before the liqueur slowly leaks toward the bottom of the glass. Both methods produce a delicious drink that finds balance between earthy tequila, fresh citrus, sweet and fruity liqueur and spicy ginger.

Today, it’s also common to find El Diablos made with fresh ginger syrup. In this case, the cocktail is usually topped with sparkling water rather than ginger beer to prevent a ginger overload. You’ve got options, and all of them yield positive results, so do what feels right to make this drink your own.


Watch the video: ΙnsideFood - Λευκή και ερυθρή οινοποίηση S08E03 (October 2021).