Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Study Says Nearly 50 Percent of Chicken Tainted with Feces, E. Coli

Study Says Nearly 50 Percent of Chicken Tainted with Feces, E. Coli

The new study is questioned by Department of Agriculture, chicken council

Antibiotics in chicken are out, but feces and E. coli are in, says a new study. The Physicians Council for Responsible Medicine (PRCM) tested chicken samples from 15 grocery stores nationwide and found that nearly half of the samples tested for the dangerous bacteria and feces.

The PRCM reports that it tested 22 nationally branded chicken products, including Pilgrim’s, Perdue, and Sanderson Farms. In some cities, like Dallas, all 100 percent of the samples tested positive for E. coli and feces. "Meat packers can’t avoid contaminating poultry products during production, and consumers are cooking and eating chicken feces in about half the cases," said PRCM president Neal Barnard, M.D. in a press release.

However, public health advocates, such as Dirk Fillpot from the Department of Agriculture, cited problems with the study's conclusions, saying the study was small and that the E. coli strain found isn't harmful to humans. It was also not a peer-reviewed study, the National Chicken Council pointed out in a statement. Calling the NRCM a "pseudo-medical, vegan advocacy group," the council said the study's claims were misleading; it said that production actually reduces bacteria found on chicken as it moves through the processing plant, and that the E. coli strain is impossible to determine where it is from. Said Ashley Peterson, vice president of science and technology for the NCC, "Their conclusion is disingenuous at best when looking at 57 questionable samples out of approximately 42 million pounds of ready-to-cook chicken products in grocery stores on any given day."

The PRCM said that skinless chicken was the most contaminated, and that even organic labelled products were found to have feces and E.coli on them.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.


Will Pharmaceuticals, Chemical and Agribusinesses Control Our Lives Through Federal, State and Local Governments ?

In the USA one-hundred years ago, everybody who had food to eat expected rather good health, especially if they lived in small towns. The diseases we have today were rare. At that time, the greatest fears were freezing and starvation. Most other deaths occurred during cold seasons from gradual nightly carbon monoxide and tar poisons from burning wood or coal in fireplaces, wood stoves and ovens where houses, cottages or shacks were closed, poorly ventilated or non-ventilated. That created lung toxicity that caused frequent flu and other respiratory diseases.

In major cities, many diseases and deaths were caused by the same indoor pollution plus smog from silversmiths and blacksmiths every few blocks. Rarely was there a sky-high smoke stack that pumped the smog high into the sky, diluting the toxic particles. Also, many factories, homes and buildings used coal-burning furnaces that vaporized mercury into the air. Heavy metal poisons were constantly in the air as they are today but they were held in concentrations in households and narrow streets. When animals are exposed to such air-pollution as coal dust and vaporized mercury, many develop pulmonary diseases like the Black Plague. Vessels for eating and drinking usually were made of poisonous metals, adding to the toxicity that caused diseases of the times.