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The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains

The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains

Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains

A Spanish restaurant chain called La Mafia is being forced by the European Union to rebrand following complaints from the Italian government, which objected to the use of the name of the criminal organization. According to The Local, the Italians have been trying to get the restaurant to change its name on the grounds that it was “contrary to accepted principles of morality.” Several members of the Italian parliament complained that the glamorization and commercialization of the Mafia's name was distasteful. The restaurant chain and Spanish authorities had rejected the complaints, but this week the EU’s Office for Intellectual Property officially sided with Italy, which means the chain will have to find a new name.

Tipsy Drinkers Leave Car at Bar, Come Back to Find a Present

Earlier this week, a couple drinking at a Canadian bar decided they’d had too much to safely drive home and instead took an Uber. According to Today, Paula Schultz was expecting to get in trouble for having left her car in the parking lot of Original Joe’s in Calgary. When she arrived the next day to pick it up, she found a note on the car, but instead of a scolding, the note thanked her for being responsible and offered her a free pound of chicken wings next time she came to the restaurant. Restaurant manager Jay McLean has been handing out rewards to responsible drinkers for a year and a half in the hopes that it will encourage more people to find other rides home when they’ve had too much to drink.

Woman Files $20M Suit Against KFC for False Advertising

Food photography is a complicated art, and everyone knows that the pictures in advertisements don’t bear a huge resemblance to what the food actually looks like. One New York woman apparently didn't realize this, and she was so angry when she saw the chicken in her KFC bucket that she’s now suing the chain for $20 million. According to the New York Post, Anna Wurtzburger thought her $20 bucket of chicken would be “overflowing,” the way it looks in KFC commercials. “They say it feeds the whole family … They’re showing a bucket that’s overflowing with chicken,” she told the Post. “You get half a bucket! That’s false advertising, and it doesn’t feed the whole family.” Wurtzburger reportedly hired a lawyer and is suing the company. She’s reportedly seeking $20 million in damages, but the company says the suit is without merit.

Japan Gets Magic Love Apples for Halloween

Halloween is not known for being the most romantic holiday, but love might be in the air for some magically inclined romantics in Japan, who can buy special apples that claim to have actual magic powers. According to Rocket News 24, Japan’s Black Cat Magic Shop is selling magic love apples called Poison Apples of Love’s Desire for $105 apiece. Purchasers are advised to recite an incantation over the apple while imagining the person whose love they desire. Either the spell-caster or the object of the spell-caster’s affection is then meant to eat the apple, at which point he or she will reportedly experience magic-induced affection. The site does not address the morality of using magic to force a person to fall in love, but it does say the apples work just as well baked into pie as eaten raw.

This Popular British Candy Is Coming to America

Maltesers are coming to America. For decades, the U.K. has had a chocolate chip on its shoulder about the quality of British sweets over American candies. There was even serious outcry over the decreased quality of now-American-owned British Cadbury crème eggs last year. The Mars-owned British Maltesers will be available in the United States starting January 2017, Brand Eating reported. These chocolate-covered malted ball candies may be similar to Hershey’s Whoppers, but confectionary fans will note the texture and taste differences. Maltesers are already available online and in select movie theaters, but they will arrive on grocery and convenience store shelves after New Year’s.


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

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Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


The Daily Dish: Spain Loses Mafia-Themed Restaurants After Italy Complains - Recipes

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

More one pot wonders

Birria Tacos Recipe

Step up your next taco night with our ultimate guide to the best homemade tacos ever.

Cloud Bread Recipe: How to make that viral TikTok bread

You’re three ingredients away from picture perfect fluffy TikTok cloud bread!

TikTok Hot Chocolate Bombs

When you pour hot milk over these hot chocolate bombs, they melt and magically release the marshmallows and cocoa hiding inside.

106 Comments

I have only somewhat been interested in Paella, but after reading this post, I’m definitely going to try it! Thanks!

I haven’t made this in a while, and have made it with only seafood in the past, will definitely try with chicken and chorizo! Love that photo of the saffron!

Do not lose the time, they will never know what is a real paella. A Valencian guy

I love your blog. So I hope don’t upset you with my comment.
But chorizo in a paella is prophanaty. Paella can be made with chicken and rabbit or with seafood, never together. And vegetables! All paellas should have vegetables.
Sorry in Valencia, paella is our big dish, and this is rice with things, I’m sure it was delicious, but it’s rice with things.
Anyway, thanks for your work

Please! Paella varies from region to region and Valencia does not have the monopoly on paella nor how it should be made – my Mom who was from Fernancaballero made it with pork,chicken, shrimp, mussels and calamares when times were good! Less if times were tight. And paella with chorizo is absoultely wonderful. I personally make it with tomate frito, chicken breast, pork, shrimp and chorizo and instead of chicken broth use seafood broth. For my vegetable I use peas but green beans are tasty too. So to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting.

Well said Julie, to call any dish that doesn’t fall into your narrow scope of experience as “rice with things” is a little insulting. My father would make it with chicken, shrimp, lobster, chorizo, and would at times throw in fish. My grandfather who was a spaniard loved it.

hehehe I agree with your comment. And yes, vegetables are really important in any rice!

That’s bull. I read a response on another paella review that used chorizo. The person said they had just come back from a 2-week trip to Spain, had paella at 6 different places spread all over the country including in the house of a local family, and that every single one used chorizo. I too get tired of people who insist that a dish is not “authentic” just because it is not done a certain way. Especially irritating are complaints that it is not authentic when the chef never even claimed it was authentic!

Every August we make one very like this at our friends’ cottage on Plymouth Long Beach, except we supplement the shellfish with a lobster! The lobster adds a great splash of color in the middle of that big pan. Maybe it’s not authentically Spanish, but if you want fresh and local fish for the dish, lobster’s what we’ve got!

My father was from Valencia and my mother from Alicante. Our family have cooked and eaten many paella’s. The beauty of this dish is that you make it with what’s regionally available and what you like. We always had it with chicken, pork, clams, mussels, shrimp, fresh string beans or peas and chick peas. It’s best made outdoors on an open fire to incorporate that “smokey” flavor. My children and their friends love to watch it being made (and eating it!) it is a very “social” meal. Makes for great memories.

Everything looks very yummy.I love it

A very festive meal, this is. Even the color is really enticing. I would love to try sometime but the complexity gives me the hesitations. You have presented the recipe however in so easy a manner that I am inspired to try this really soon…Thanks!
Anyways, your phenomenal photos have caught our attention, we have been in the lookout for unique and interesting bloggers since we have launched our food photo gallery http://www.yumgoggle.com/gallery/ This will allow you to showcase all your great work and share it with our visitors. We’d be proud to have your work as part of our growing collection to continue to have a larger reach and further inspire all fellow food lovers out there!

I’ve never made paella, but that clearly must change! I totally want to make a big batch and eat it all week for lunch.

Hello,
I love your blog and as usual it is a deliciously fun article.
There are as many kind of paellas as regions (just like you say “customizable”), as families and as each and every member of a same family (in mine nobody makes it the same way with very different results )… Like couscous or meatballs recipes, everybody has its own…
Other people (the ones with the “truth”) will ask “why didn’t you do the “sofrito”?” and so on and so on and so on… But in fact, there’s no “real” recipe…
I’m sure yours was wonderful…

NEVER add chorizo to a paella. That’s not even Spanish.

We are talking about Spanish chorizo not Mexican chorizo…Completely different chorizo…

The referenced saveur.com recipe calls for the correct style of chorizo but the blog’s author (mistakenly IMO) switched to Mexican chorizo.

I made the same mistake in my first paella, it was kind of a disaster. Sliced andouille or other cajun style sausage is a tasty and cheaper substitute for spanish chorizo.


The author actually said “ if your going to use chorizo, Spanish chorizo is the way to go but if you wanted Mexican chorizo is ok.“

I love paella, and the bomba rice really makes a difference. And yes, eating it in Valencia is amazing, partly because most paella restaurants are by the beach so you get that ambiance with it. There are lots of paella purists out there (as you will note in the comments) but like you said, it really is a pan where you can make your own creation. And yes, I love the socarrat too (when it turns out)! -)

Ouch that giant paella is killing me. Thank you for your ‘how to choose the proper pan’ to cook this type of food. It’s really helpful.


Wow, every dish looks amazing including this one. Keep up the good work and continue making us drool. ^^

I am sure you have heard by now but in the true Valencia fashion – newspaper is added as the top (after the whole dish has come to a good rolling boil) heat is reduced (fire burned down at the exact appropriate time even building the fire is an art!

Should I have the lid on while the rice is absorbing the broth?


People.
She is not claiming to have the “one and only, the greatest paella in the world”…off course
everyone will have their own versions!
If you blog to criticize…..you are missing the point.
Great pictures.

sorry replied to the wrong question.

can you make an aioli please to go with the paella!

I love to eat and I can see no reason to not love paella!

Love your blog! Keep it up!

I’m sorry, but I’m spanish, from Valencia, and this is NOT paella

Please share a resource for us non-Valencians to understand how to make an authentic paella.


Nice photos! Guys didn’t you read the whole post? “**Paella is totally customizable so feel free to make this dish vegetarian, all seafood, or all meats.”Keep in blogging! By the way, the shrimps are the best part :)

I used to work at a restaurant that made the best Paella ever! I haven’t had the courage to make it on my own but might just have to give this recipe a try. I’d love to ramp up the spiciness of this dish…any suggestions?

Oh the Valencian paella is the best!!


My goodness, this is amazing, you are amazing – can’t wait to try all the recipes on your blog! Keep up the great work :)

I love your pictures. You’re a very talented food stylist, cook, writer, and food photographer. I’m a fellow blogger who’s trying to learn how to take better food photographs as my photos are really bad. I was wondering if you also teach for a fee via email or in person.


I was looking for a recipe for Paella. I’ve found it. And i found a great food blog. thanks.

This is a good food blog. Albeit I can not eat each and every recipe but Paella. Thanks

Wow, great blog and photography. What’s going on with the hiatus though?

Ooooohhh, this looks delicious and the photos are fantastic, great job! I’ve stumbled on this page about trends in food and various market research related to the topic: http://www.researchspy.com/ Food sites are my favourite place to go on the web!


Oh, gosh.
could you let me be one of your dinner member?
Look soooo delicious!

hi..
This is a great blog. Recipes found here makes me wanna start cooking.

Btw, Filipinos make the best paellas in Asia!


I love Paella! Fantastic recipe! Thanks.


I had many Paellas in Spain (and even a very good one in Amsterdam!), but I’m telling you none of them looked so amazing. What a fantastic picture! Even the (btw Spanish) boyfriend turned his had to have a look at it…


Love these yummy recipes! I look forward to more!


Thank you for the wonderful recipe! I cooked paella for my girlfriend and son tonight for a special Valentines dinner. I added scallops, carrots and greenbeans to your recipe. I grew up with a Hawaiian grandfather who loved to make paella and he always added the carrots and greenbeans. I am just now coming out of the food coma, and the family loved it.

I’m looking forward of cooking this dish in my kitchen.

Thanks a lot for this recipe.


I made the Mixed Paella and my goodness was it delicious. I highly recommend this recipe. The recipe produced food as good looking as the photographs!

I like to eat paella food, paella food generally made in simple rice but i like mixed paella or rice ,sea food, meat and vegetable.


yummmm i love it
thank u for this great paella

I am Spanish (since I was born!) and I’ve only seen using chorizo in Paella here in London. Original Paella does NOT include chorizo. Come on, think about it. We’re using fresh ingredients, fresh fish, expensive saffron… Why to mask the gorgeousness of these ingredients with the flavour of chorizo?

I spent part of my childhood in Madrid and paella was a favorite. Our maid made paella with chicken, pork, chorizo and snails. It was what she made for the kids when the parents were entertaining and serving steak. Lucky us. When we moved back to the states we substituted clams and shrimp for the snails. Valencia does not have the market on the only paella. It truly depends on the region and what is available. I grow saffron in my garden now because I love paella and I use saffron in many other dishes as well.

This is yummy! Going to try this!

Looks delicious,Thanks a lot for this recipe.

I don’t care about what other’s opinion is. I love Paella period. Haha. You’re so great at photography and cooking, hope I’ll be like you someday *wink* =)))

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.

I like your advice. I’ve made Paella 3 times in this past week, as I am gearing up for Catering Paella for 60 in one month and I want to make it correctly. As it is for my friends 60th Birthday, and she is Puerto Rican. Can’t mess it up . So I’m experimenting with the stock. The last time I made it I used bottled clam juice and a little chicken stock and a little white wine, and sweet paprika with just a little smoked paprika. I used basmati rice, but it doesn’t quite do it, so I ordered some Calasperra rice. I used andouille sausage – No thanks, it doesn’t blend well with the other flavors. Used chicken thighs, and prawns & clams – that’s the winning combination. I like lots of sweet red bell pepper and peas. Do you ever marinate the chicken before cooking ? Use any kinds of culinary herbs ? What kind of stock do you like to use ? I am open to suggestions –

Am I supposed to cover the pan after I put the rice in and cook it without stirring for 12-15 minutes? What about when I reduce the heat to low and add the seafood?

Very brave of you to try the variations. We use chicken thighs, Portugese chorizo and shrimp. Try shelling the shrimp and adding them 5-7 minutes before the finish of the dish. Just tuck them down in the rice and they will take care of themselves.

Personally, I prefer the Portugese chorizo also. It is made slightly differently from the Spanish and I think it less greasy … maybe that was just the brand tho.

Anyway, you can put ANYTHING in a paella. My favorite is artichokes. Get the raw artichokes, cut them in fourths. at the V you’ll see the start of the little thistles. Cut diagonally thru the choke and what is left is pretty much edible. Treat the choke as a meat, that is, brown it after you’ve browned the pork and/or chicken. Add the chokes back in when you put in the rice.

Also, about the “minced tomatoes”? If you’re going to use American commercial tomatoes, you should probably use canned, CRUSHED tomatoes. They taste better, no seeds and are a pot load easier. 1.5 cups of crushed tomatoes is about 3 large tomatoes.


Amazing post and blog all together. I never get tired of looking at the photography and I find it inspiring, intense, and in cases dramatic, always edgy and super cool. I love paella too. I’ve made it plenty of times. I’ve had it in Spain too… actually, it is hard to find paella made from scratch in restaurants there, there’s this company that makes them and sells them frozen to tons of places.. it’s kinda sad. But making paella is time consuming so I can see why this is happening there. In the US, if I want paella, very likely it will be made from scratch because there’s a least a 45 minute wait. But nothing like making it at home the way we like it :)

AARRGGHH! I was about to begin this dish using a 16″ cast iron skillet. Pretty sure I may need to add one more important item before I begin, a proper Paella pan. Thanks the good advice, and for you beautifully styled, photographed & presented material. A++!

well said Bravo CURIOUSTUMMIES
let’s recap

I think this is a really good blog, but I agree, I am half Valencian-half Londoner and this rice dish traditionally started by adding what was available for the rice field workers at the time. So you can interpret this as freely as you like. But, if you wish to make a good quality Paella and true to the original one, then you must not add many of the ingredients above and specially not chorizo.

My reason for this isn’t only to keep the authenticity, but also because of the greasiness that chorizo will instantly add to the rice, avoiding it from cooking to perfection and never the less the strong flavour that indeed masquerades the dish.

I feel the same with the sort of chicken you might use, if you use breast it will become vey dry and therefore not appealing and the same for prawns, if you add them already peeled, they will become dry and tasteless. I understand many people do this for the comfort of not peeling them or because they find them repulsive but just ruins the prawns.

Anyway, enough with my opinion, I managed to bore myself here.

I feel other sorts of rice with other ingredients are either, arroces al horno, or may as well be called Spanish rices.


Wow the presentation is very attractive and most of the ingredients are not hard to find. But I was thinking what will I substitute for the saffron to make the dish as tasty as yours. I will definitely try your recipe if I’m ready. Thanks!


I am food lover person. Fantastic recipe!. I am going to make this today in my home.

Love paella and I’m chuckling a bit at the “things” comment as I like a fatty pork sausage (kielbasa) in my paella…the pork plays well with the seafood and the chicken.

What’s up, after reading this remarkable post i am too glad to share my experience here with colleagues.


We lived in Spain for 12 years and had plenty of paella meals with friends. Your’s looks beautiful and delicious! –like a Spanish mom whipped it up!


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