Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

This Sea-Inspired Beer Is Made With Lobsters and Seaweed

This Sea-Inspired Beer Is Made With Lobsters and Seaweed

The limited-edition beer contains 7 percent ABV

The brewery also sells beer inspired by sake, chocolate, and mushrooms.

Beer can be made with almost anything nowadays — there’s beer made from bonsai trees, sewer water, and even toast. Now there’s a new sea-inspired beer by the U.K.’s Wild Beer Co., and it’s made with 30 lobsters.

According to the brewery, the “Of The Sea” beer is made with lobsters, cockles, seaweed, sea salt, and sea herbs in addition to the standard grain mash.

Inspiration struck the team when co-founders Andrew Cooper and Brett Ellis held a brewery “bisque off” in honor of their favorite dish, lobster bisque, The Huffington Post reported. The team committed to minimal waste during the process by enjoying a lobster lunch after the now-cooked crustaceans were removed from the boil.

If you’re interested in trying the unofficial beer of the sea, you’d better hurry — only 120 kegs and 8,000 bottles were produced.

To read about 10 things you didn’t know about beer, click here.


Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl

Kelpie

Prior to the 1850's Scottish coastal alehouses brewed with malted barley, grown in fields fertilised by seaweed. This environment gave the barley a very specific flavour which we recreate by the inclusion of fresh seaweed in the mash tun. A rich dark chocolate ale, which has the aroma of a fresh Scottish sea breeze and a distinctive malty texture.

Tasting Notes

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Colour

Make yourself comfortable in a well-lit room. Pour your beer into a glass and take a good, long look.

Describe what you see. Is it clear or cloudy? Does the foam on the head stick around or quickly dissipate? Is that foam "rocky" or "fluffy" and how would you describe its colour? Does the foam leave "lace" on the glass as you sip the beer? And the bubbles? Tight and champagne-like or larger and more bulbous?

Finally, colour: Use as many words as you want to describe it.

Mahogany, Dark Brown, Deep Red

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Aroma

Did you know the sense of smell accounts for about 80% of flavor perception?

Okay, here we go: Let your freshly-poured glass of beer breathe for a few moments. Now, give it a few brief sniffs. Swirl the glass a bit—like you’ve seen wine-buffs do—and have another whiff. Look past the obvious "smells like beer" responses. What other aromas are you getting? Maybe toasted malts, piney hops, maybe ester-and-phenol-producing yeast? Fruit? Spices?

Roasted Malts, Sea Air, Chocolate, Coffee

Tasting Tips from the Brotherhood

Taste

Now that you have visually inspected your beer & described its aroma, you can engage in tasting. Remember that tasting is about the transition of flavors from the first sip contact through the finish.

Allow the beer to coat the inside of your mouth. Allow the liquid to run the full gamut of your tongue and hit all those taste bud areas, importantly, the bitterness receptors at the back of the tongue.

Now, describe the length, intensity and quality of the finish.

Sweet Maltyness, Toasted Malts, Chocolate, Slight Saltiness

Brew Sheet

Brewer's Lingo

ABV stands for Alcohol By Volume. It is a standard measure of how much alcohol is contained in a given volume of an alcoholic beverage.

Brewer's Lingo

IBUs stands for International Bittering Units. We use the IBU scale to measure of the bitterness of beer, which is provided by the hops used during brewing.

The bittering effect is less noticeable in beers with a high quantity of malt, so a higher IBU is needed in heavier beers to balance the flavor.

Brewer's Lingo

OG stands for Original Gravity.

Drink Kelpie with&hellip

From the drinkers of Kelpie

Kelpie Ale in a word is OUTSTANDING! You can really smell the hint of chocolate and the salty aroma of sea kelp. This ale goes with any type of food from nicely grilled steaks to any fresh sea food. It has become my favourite and always have some on hand.

&ndash Mike Feiner

Bought this ale out of sheer "seaweed" curiosity. Rewarded with a superbly balanced dark and surprisingly moorish brew. Delightful!

&ndash Mike Lofts

My favourite beer. Ever. Its rarely seen in my part of the States, but when I find it, I buy up all I can.

&ndash Cggyrl


Watch the video: ΑΚΑΤΑΛΛΗΛΕΣ ΕΡΩΤΗΣΕΙΣ #1 (November 2021).