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If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This

If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This

So you’ve had one too many glasses of wine with dinner and you feel a headache coming on. You reach into your bag and track down some Advil, but is it a good idea to take it? Alcohol doesn’t just get you drunk, it affects your entire body, and when combined with medicines, it can cause some adverse reactions. Here’s how alcohol reacts with four of the main varieties of over-the-counter painkillers.

Acetaminophen (Tylenol)
Mixing Tylenol with alcohol is a really bad idea. According to WebMD, a 2013 report found that combining Tylenol with even a small amount of alcohol can raise your risk of kidney disease by a whopping 123 percent. While neither normal acetaminophen use nor light-to-moderate drinking posed a threat to kidneys, as soon as the two were combined the ill effects become evident. Be careful not to take acetaminophen in excess, with or without alcohol; it’s the number one cause of acute liver failure in the United States.

Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
Both ibuprofen and alcohol can irritate your stomach, so combining the two can result in stomach issues, including upper gastrointestinal bleeding, according to Healthline. However, taking a normal dose of ibuprofen after drinking a small amount of alcohol will not be harmful to most people. Everyday Health agrees, but suggests that you limit alcohol use while taking any medication.

Aspirin (Bayer, Bufferin, Excedrin)
The main risk of combining alcohol and aspirin is that of stomach bleeding, so notify your doctor if you experience any symptoms. Also, a 1990 study found that taking two aspirin tablets an hour before drinking increased blood alcohol levels by 30 percent more than alcohol alone, so mixing the two can potentially increase your level of impairment.

Naproxen (Aleve)
Like aspirin, naproxen carries the risk of causing stomach bleeding with combined with alcohol. It’s generally considered safe to mix the two in moderate amounts, but it’s advisable to avoid any painkiller when drinking heavily.

If you’re taking prescription painkillers as opposed to over-the-counter ones, you should definitely stay away from alcohol; Oxycodone, for example, depresses the central nervous system, and when mixed with alcohol it can slow your breathing until it stops. If you’re going to mix over-the-counter painkillers with alcohol, make sure you read the warning labels, don’t take more than the suggested dosage, and don’t drink in excess; just learning what happens to your body after you black out from drinking might be enought to make you cool it!


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


If You Ever Mix Pain Relievers with Alcohol, You'll Want to Read This - Recipes

Drink in moderation, if at all.

If you enjoy a glass of wine or pint of beer with dinner, you might wonder whether alcohol is a friend or foe to arthritis. The answer is, it&rsquos a bit of both. While moderate drinking may reduce some risks of developing arthritis, if you already suffer from arthritis or a condition like gout, it may do more harm than good.

Anti-inflammatory Benefits
Enjoying a drink with some regularity might reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a few studies. &ldquoModerate alcohol consumption reduces biomarkers of inflammation, including c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6, and TNF-alpha receptor 2,&rdquo says Karen Costenbader, MD, MPH, a rheumatologist at Brigham and Women&rsquos Hospital in Boston. Alcohol&rsquos anti-inflammatory effects are also thought to be one of the reasons it appears to lower cardiovascular disease risk in moderate drinkers. The key word is moderate, which most people overestimate when it comes to alcohol. &ldquoWe saw that for women who drank between 5 and 10 grams of alcohol a day, there was a reduced risk of RA,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. But that works out to less than a glass of wine or beer daily.

Medication Interactions
Once you already have arthritis, drinking may have more downsides than pluses. Many of the medicines your doctor prescribes to relieve sore joints don&rsquot mix well with alcohol &ndash including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve), which carry a greater risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers when you drink. Taken with acetaminophen, methotrexate or leflunomide (Arava), alcohol can make you more susceptible to liver damage.

Gout Attacks
Alcohol is particularly problematic if you have gout. &ldquoGout attacks can be brought on by purine-rich foods or drinks, and beer is high in purines,&rdquo Dr. Costenbader says. Distilled liquor, and possibly wine, can also cause problems for those with gout.

Additional Risks
If you have arthritis and want to drink, talk to your doctor. Even with a doctor&rsquos ok, limit yourself to one drink a day. That&rsquos about 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of wine and 1.5 ounces of spirits.

Excess drinking can damage your body in many other ways. &ldquoThe risk of other kinds of diseases goes up with higher alcohol consumption,&rdquo says Dr. Costenbader. Conditions linked to drinking more than moderate amounts of alcohol include cancers of the breast, colon, esophagus, mouth and throat, as well as diseases like diabetes and stroke.

If you choose to drink, alcohol should only be one small part of a healthy diet. Eating healthy, exercising, controlling your weight and not smoking are better ways to protect your joints and the rest of your body, says Dr. Costenbader.


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