Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

How to Open 24 Bottles of Beer at Once

How to Open 24 Bottles of Beer at Once

Having a party? You might need this hefty bottle opener

We may have needed this for our Cinco de Mayo festivities last weekend, but we're sure this bottle opener would be useful for upcoming summer barbecues.

This 24-bottle beer bottle opener is just the gadget for any big parties, where you have multiple people asking for bottles of beer. No need to be host and bartender, popping away multiple beer bottle caps as you juggle talking to new people. Instead, make it a big scene, where you open 24 at once and have a group cheer or something like that.

This video showcases what seems to be ingenuous Danish engineering, with this bottle opener opening 24 bottles with one single push. Granted, some of the caps may have stayed on (or just didn't fall completely off), but 20 bottles in one push isn't bad at all. Just make sure there are enough people to drink the beers; we don't want any of that going flat.


Beer Bottles - 22 oz. (Case of 12)

Traditional 22 oz longneck beer bottles, often referred to as "beer bomber bottles", take standard crown caps (26 mm). 12 bottles per case, with dividers. These bomber bottles are thicker and darker than most other bottles, offering better protection against UV rays and preventing your beer from becoming lightstruck. These bottles are used by the likes of Stone, Speakeasy, Drakes, Knee Deep and even Anheuser Busch.

The displacement caused by a 3/8" bottle filler (B411) leaves the perfect amount of headspace in your bottle. Significantly reduce your bottling time by switching from 12 oz bottles to 22 oz bottles. Two cases of this classic beer bottle will house a standard 5 gallon batch of homebrew (you may need an extra bottle or two if you ended up with a full five gallons). Fits all standard (26 mm) pry-off and universal style crown caps.

Don't forget your bottle caps. We stock over 10 different colors and styles of crown caps! Skip labelling your bottles by identifying them with colored crown caps.


Bottle Cleaning/Sanitizing Rack

Most homebrewers would agree that the better part of brewing beer at home is spent cleaning and sanitizing equipment. A lot of dedication goes into every batch and after waiting weeks for fermentation to be done you are ready for some payback. There is only one step that separates you from drinking that beer, and that is bottling or kegging. Bottling beer takes a lot of work — mostly spent cleaning and sanitizing each bottle.

Some of the most common methods for cleaning/sanitizing bottles that I am aware of are using chemicals and soaking the bottles in cleaning/sanitizing solutions, putting the bottles through the steam cycle in the dishwasher, or using a dry heat cycle in the kitchen oven.

In my experience, the first of these methods takes the most work. Bottles are dipped in cleaning solutions and you have to physically brush the insides and then rinse each bottle in preparation for sanitizing. The dishwasher method has the advantage of using wet heat, which is much more effective than dry heat in the oven, but there is the problem that the bottles have to be placed in upside down. That makes it hard to have a uniform coverage of steam deep inside of the bottle. The dry heating method in the oven works well by itself for sanitizing provided the bottles are already clean.

The bottle rack described in this project uses the oven as a source of heat to generate steam inside of the bottle for cleaning and sanitizing purposes. This enhances the cleaning power of the dry method.

The bottle rack in this project is made of aluminum sheet metal and holds 24 bottles. It can be used in two positions: drying position (bottles upside down) and steaming position (bottles upright). I chose 24 bottles to make it easily portable, and because that is the number of bottles that come in a case. The reasons to use aluminum for its construction are several: It does not corrode easily in high moisture environments, it is lightweight, it withstands high temperatures, it does not need painting (so there is no risk of toxic fumes) and it is easy to work with (as opposed to stainless steel).

To use this bottle rack, I add approximately 50 milliliters of water into every bottle and then put it in the oven for one hour at 250 °F (121 °C) so the bottles are steam cleaned and sanitized. The rack makes it easy to transport the bottles into and out of the oven once they have cooled. The time and temperature I leave the bottles in the oven could probably be adjusted to a higher temperature and shorter heating time. In any case, one important detail to keep in mind is to add enough water to support the length of time in the oven so that there is continuous formation of steam. Adding too little may result in the water evaporating too quickly without really getting the benefits of wet heat (as mentioned above, dry heat is not as effective and takes a much longer heat cycle to obtain the same sanitizing effects). Also, note that if your bottles are extremely dirty they may require a second pass through the oven. Some bottles are not even worth the effort.

Parts & Tools
Aluminum sheet metal (16 – 14 gauge)
Hand drill
1/8-inch drill bit
1.5-inch hole saw
(4) #6 screws and nuts
Pair of vice grips
Black Sharpie marker

1. Lay out bottle pattern and drill bottle neck holes

Cut one piece of sheet metal 12-inch x 24-inch (30吹 cm) and another piece of sheet metal 12-inch by 32-inch (30呍 cm). Most metal supply stores will cut sheet metal pieces to your desired dimensions for a small fee. This is the easier way to go, but you may also use a regular hand saw. Using a black Sharpie, lay out the bottle pattern on the 12吔-inch (30吹 cm) piece of aluminum sheet metal. This bottle pattern is the same as they come in a 24-bottle case. Each bottle occupies a 2.5-inch (6.3 cm) square in an area of 10吋 inches (25吢 cm) centered on the 12吔 inch (30吹 cm) aluminum sheet. Using a hand drill with a 1.5-inch hole saw, drill the holes that are going to receive the bottlenecks on the 12吔 inch (30吹 cm) sheet.

2. Bend sheet metal pieces

Mark your bending lines and bend at 90 degrees. The 12吔 inch (30吹 cm) sheet is going to be bent 3.5 inches (8.9 cm) from each side. The 12吜 (30呍 cm) inch sheet is bent 7.5 inches (19 cm) from the sides. The easiest way of doing this is using a sheet metal bending brake. If you don’t own one, most shops have one and will charge next to nothing for this simple job (it takes less than 5 minutes to do these bends). As a last resource (as shown here), you could do the bends by clamping the sheet metal on a metal table with a clean edge and gently tapping the sheet metal with a rubber mallet.

3. Drill pin holes and assemble bottle rack

Use a hand drill with a 1/8-inch bit to drill pivoting/locking holes on corners of sheet metal parts. The location of these holes is going to determine the height of the bottles that will fit in the bottle rack. For the standard 12 ounce bottle, there should be a 7-inch gap between the bottom and top sheet metal layers. It would be useful to drill several of these holes approximately ¼ inch apart so that the rack can accommodate bottles of different heights. Lay sheet metal pieces on top of each other and secure by running #6 screws and nuts.

4. Insert bottles upside down

Insert bottles upside down in drying position and swing the cover over the bottom of the bottles and secure with pins. The bottles have to be compressed tightly between the layers of sheet metal so that no bottles come loose out of the rack in the next step. For this reason, it is very important that all bottles be the same height.

5. Fill each bottle with 1/2-inch of water

Flip the whole rack with bottles to upright position and add approximately ½ inch of water into each bottle with a hose, moving from one bottle to another in a continuous fashion to save time. The amount of water going into each bottle does not have to be precisely measured as long as you are in the ball park. Not too low that the boiling will stop too quickly or too high that it will take much longer for a given bottle to start boiling. While doing this, begin preheating the oven at 250 °F (121 °C).

6. “Cook” the bottles in the oven

Put the bottle rack in the kitchen oven that is now warmed up to 250 °F (121 °C) for 60 minutes. This will steam clean and sanitize the bottles. Let the bottles cool down after the heating cycle has finished, then take bottle rack out from the oven and flip to drying position. The bottles are now ready for use.


24 x Guinness Foreign Extra Beer Bottle 24 Case 330ml (IMPORTED)

This is a beer born of a thirst for adventure tracing its origins back to a recipe for West India Porter, first set out by Arthur Guinness II in 1801. In the early 1800s, while other breweries were content to stay close to home, Guninness brewery struck out into unchartered territories, braving the perils of sea travel to export their famous black beer across the globe. Brewed with more hops to preserve the beer in the ships’ holds during voyages of four-to-five weeks in tropical climes, the recipe yielded a powerful drink with a complex, fruity bittersweet flavour.

Fruit and caramel flavours begin, smoky notes and a vibrant bitterness follow. Where extra hops and a stronger alcohol percentage were once used to preserve the beer, allowing it to survive and thrive during long sea voyages, now they yield its bold taste and unique flavour profile.


Start Your Own Brewery

You have said it to yourself. Maybe your friends have said it to you, too. “Your beer is excellent. You should open your own brewery.”

Many have considered it. A few have even made it happen. But as the pros will tell you, there’s more to running a brewery than making good beer. Following is a glimpse of what it takes.

Bill Moore is founder, brewmaster, and a member of the board of directors of Independence Brewing in northeast Philadelphia. Moore was an avid homebrewer for 12 years before brewing professionally. He spent five years brewing at Stoudt Brewery in Adamstown, Pa., before opening his own place.

Moore understands the most important aspect of running a microbrewery: selling beer.

To Market, To Market

“Market pressure is what is driving the craft industry. The consumers, at least here on the East Coast, are getting more and more sophisticated and willing to try new things,” says Moore. “Our task is a balance of making products that are interesting enough to get attention but traditional enough to sell.

That’s the key difference between homebrewing and doing it professionally. It’s one thing to make a couple of cases in your basement and really like it. Some of your buddies might like it, too, so you are tempted to believe that the beer would sell in the open marketplace. In reality it might sell or it might not, depending on a million other factors.”

When choosing the beer to brew, Moore quickly learned that success in the beer business means giving the customer what he wants, not want you think he wants. “We made our debut in the Philly market with our Independence Ale, which was stronger, maltier, and hoppier than anything the beer-drinking public was used to. It was well balanced but very big. In fact, too big. We quickly learned that Philadelphia was one of the nation’s biggest Coors Lite markets. It did not take a lot of inspiration to realize that we overestimated the tastes of our customers and we had to tone it down a notch or two.

You have to weigh isolated requests from a few people with the kind of large-scale demand that ultimately affects your bottom line, Moore says.

One of the craftbrewer’s weekly challenges is sorting out the difference between real consumer demand and fads. “Sometimes it’s not so easy,” says Moore. “For example berry beers and fruit ales are popular now, as are honey beers. But if I am going to put a berry weizen on the market, I had better be pretty sure that it is going to sell before I start making it 40 barrels at a time.

“We have five beers on the street right now: our pale ale, a lager, our Gold, a porter, and the Franklinfest, which is an Oktoberfest style. Even with that much variety, the sales guys keep coming back, reporting that the distributors want something different. We are jumping through hoops just to keep our regular stuff going, and we really can’t afford to climb on every fad that comes down the pike.”

But then again, when you think you have tapped into real demand, you have to be flexible enough in your plant to be able to get the new style out there. Constant demand has caused Moore to make porter year-round instead of seasonally.

For this reason, you need a professional brewery, run by professionals, according to Moore.

Once you get the beer itself in good shape, you still have far to go. You will have your distribution market to deal with. That’s another reason you need people in the organization who not only know the business but know the business in your market. “For example the Pennsylvania market is drastically different than the market in, say, Maryland or Jersey. In Pennsylvania beer is sold by the case, through distributors. It takes a big commitment to buy beer here. The customer wants some beer, so he walks into a distributor and has to be willing to take a chance on 24 bottles of beer. He or she is unlikely to make that commitment for an unknown or unfamiliar beer,” says Moore.

“In Jersey or Maryland you can walk into a big liquor store and buy a six-pack. In many stores you can even buy a single bottle. It’s much easier to get someone to try your beer if it only involves a few dollars and a few bottles. We don’t have that luxury in Pennsylvania.”

Finding distributors who know your area is important, he adds.

The distributors, too, can make life challenging for the brewer. They have a lot of control over the small brewery’s success. They want a good price, and some will do anything to save 50 cents on a case. And they may not accommodate your every need.

Moore wanted to produce unpasteurized beer. When he realized that distributors were not going to refrigerate it, he changed his brewing procedure to increase the beer’s shelf life.

“It’s a very competitive market and it is getting more so. The micro pioneers had only the big boys to compete with. We still have them, but we are also competing with ourselves and with big brewers masquerading as craft brewers.

“Besides that, the big micros from out West are expanding their markets into the East. You have got to be the best you can be and flexible enough to respond to a rapidly changing marketplace. You won’t have what it takes if you try to do it on the cheap or build a brewery on a shoestring,” he says.

Moore puts a $2.5 million lowball price tag on building a 30- or 40-barrel brewery. That includes production, packaging, marketing, and transportation. Moore says the $1.5 million he started with was not enough, and he has been raising capital ever since by selling private shares. To stay financially healthy, Independence plans a public offering in the near future.

Moore’s firm learned the hard way that saving money up front often costs you much more later. The lesson came in the form of his bottling line. “The bottling line is a very important and, unfortunately, a very expensive part of the micro’s equipment list,” says Moore. “We made the mistake, like other micros, of buying a used line that did not live up to our expectations. We bought it through the back pages of one of the trade journals, and it did not come with any support or expertise. We got what we paid for — a bottling line, nothing more.”

Buying the bottling line was a bad move because the employees at Independence lack knowledge, and the dealer does not provide enough support, Moore says.

Independence is tearing out the used line and replacing it with new equipment that comes with customer service support. “I would advise anyone who is serious about this business to choose equipment and suppliers very carefully. You want some accountability to go with the equipment,” he says.

Also keep in mind the size and layout of your building. Independence served as a warehouse and steel fabrication plant before the brewers moved in. They have high ceilings and 35,000 square feet to grow into. “If you are successful, you are going to grow and you need to have space. If your building is just right or if it feels too small when you open, you are probably heading for trouble,” Moore says.

Moore’s approach is to build breweries bigger. “It’s not going to be worth it to you to build anything under a 10-barrel capacity, even in a brewpub. You won’t save much by building smaller, and the cost of production is significantly higher when you build small. Making 10 barrels instead of four or five will cost you literally pennies more. It always costs more to expand, rather than starting off with the capacity you need to go the distance.”

The bottom line is that if you are seriously considering the option, you have to be willing to admit that operating a brewery is a business. To keep a business successful, you have to be willing to raise enough money, buy the right gear, get the right building, hire the right people, and sell the right beer. “If you have unlimited cash on hand and you do not have to work for a living, make anything you want, any way you want. But if you want to make money at it, you have got to be willing to do whatever it takes to keep the beer selling,” Moore says.

A Model Brewpub

If you have never visited the Heartland Brewery on Union Square in New York City’s Flatiron district, put it on your schedule. It is one of New York’s friendliest and most comfortable places to eat, drink, have a cigar, or just hang out.

And that’s no accident. Jon Bloostein has gone to great lengths to make his place as comfortable as it can be. He is detail oriented, and it shows.

Heartland is decorated with handsome murals depicting scenes of agricultural tranquillity on America’s plains. It’s heavy in brick, dark wood, and comfortable lighting.

Bloostein is proud of his creation and feels he has successfully created the space he intended when construction began in late 1994.

“I was in the acquisitions and mergers business, a career that promises years of white-collar frustration for those unlucky enough to pursue it. I spent a lot of time on the West Coast and seemed to always end up hanging out in a brewpub, no matter what town I was visiting,” says Bloostein.

“I realized that New York City did not have anything quite like the West Coast brewpub, and I decided to build one. We had a few brewpubs, but they were going belly up as rent escalated. I had some experience in retail and was dumb enough to think that selling beer would be no different from selling anything else.”

As it turned out, it was his financial expertise and his investigative ability that he relied on more than his retail experience when starting the project. “I know how to find out about businesses,” he says. “So I knew which vendors and suppliers to encourage and which to avoid. My biggest challenge was in construction details. I do not know anything about construction, so I could never be sure if I was getting what I needed or if I was being taken for a ride.”

Bloostein’s instincts and a little luck got him through the details of construction and his vision kept the crews focused on the task at hand.

“I think a lot of people think a brewpub is a brewery with a restaurant. Some see it as a restaurant with a brewery. In fact it is neither. A true brewpub is a hybrid, a unique place with a unique feel.

“You have to be different, unique. Especially in a competitive market like New York, where the consumer has hundreds — if not thousands — of choices,” he says.

Bloostein is quick to point out that good beer in a brewpub goes without saying. But you have to be as dedicated to quality in the kitchen, if not more so, according to Bloostein. “The nice thing about beer is that the first glass out of the serving tank, under normal circumstances, will taste pretty much like the last glass, no matter how many were drawn in between. The kitchen runs under a different set of rules. If you make 1,000 hamburgers, they represent 1,000 opportunities to screw up. If you overcook it or undercook it or put bad lettuce on it, the customer will be unhappy. That’s why you have to be really careful about who you put in the kitchen. The lion’s share of your payroll costs will be in the kitchen, anyway. So be sure to spend that money wisely,” he says.

Bloostein admits there is no way to know if the person you hire is right until you have worked with him or her for some time. “I thought I opened with a terrific staff. Of 85 employees, only five have been here since we opened. The brewer is one of them — I was very fortunate there. Plus you have to make sure you have enough of the right people, too. I never dreamt it would take 85 people to staff this place,” he says.

Bloostein says opening a brewpub is like every other business in one important way: You can’t do it without enough capital. “It’s hard to say what a brewpub will cost without looking at the individual situation. Every town and location will be different. The important thing to realize is that it will cost significantly more than just the price of the brewhouse. I mean, some folks think that because you can buy a brewhouse for $200,000 you should budget for $300,000 and be covered. It doesn’t work like that. Not if you are going to do it right. We spent $25,000 on our sound system alone. Our computer system cost thousands. This business is replete with hidden and soft costs that will haunt you if you don’t plan to deal with them up front.

“Probably the biggest surprise I’ve had to deal with and continue to deal with is spending an incredible amount of time on non-business activities: dealing with lawyers, architects, designers, trademarking, advertising, repairmen. The list goes on. But they don’t bother you at night, when you will have plenty of time to drink,” Bloostein says with a laugh.

Teaching Brewing Enterprise

As the former president of the American Brewers Guild, Bruce Winner had regular opportunities to commune with professional brewers who serve the guild as regular and guest instructors at craft-brewing industry seminars and courses. Winner, too, doid his share of instructing would-be brewery operators.

“I think the first piece of advice I give everyone is to either hire experts in the field or become an expert yourself. Everyone has his or her own special skills, but not everyone can run a brewery. And there are many fine homebrewers who have what it takes to become professionals, but most will need training and professional assistance to go pro,” Winner says.

Winner says everyone brings a unique set of skills and experience to the brewery operation, but they may not be the skills needed to ensure success. “The micro is a combination of two basic operations: making good beer and selling it. If you do not understand sales and marketing in today’s intensely competitive beer market, the best-made beer in the world will not move. Conversely, if you know how to market beer but the beer’s no good, you will also find success elusive.”

As you might expect, Winner is a big advocate of education as a means of preparation. “Education means more than just attending seminars. Read as much as you can on the subject, and interview operators of successful breweries to find out what makes their operations profitable,” he says.

And echoing the words of Moore and Bloostein, he warns against going in with insufficient capital. “Always get more money than you think you need. It’s a tough situation, because sometimes it’s hard to estimate how much you will need. But if you do enough homework and write a good business plan, you will be able to come close,” he says.

Like his colleagues inside the brewery, Winner agrees that successful brewery entrepreneurs understand and admit that selling beer — in a micro or in a brewpub — is a business and should be viewed as such.

Most agree the salad days of the craft-brewing business are over. Still, Winner firmly believes the industry is growing with new opportunity. “I think the brewpub industry has a good five or 10 years of strong growth left. Demand is increasing as people all over America are being exposed to a huge variety of unique and full-flavored beers. And some of America’s largest cities have no brewpubs, or only one or two.

“If I had to choose one (venue — microbrewery or brewpub) over the other, in today’s market I would look more closely at the brewpub option. It’s less risky, in general, because your initial outlay is less. Plus it’s a cash business. You serve the beer and the customer pays for it, unlike the micro end where you have to bill for product and wait 60 or 90 days for payment,” he says.

Of course, the brewpub is a restaurant and the restaurant business is notoriously risky. “If you do not know anything about the restaurant business, either don’t build a brewpub or get a partner who knows the restaurant business very well,” Winner says.

No one can guarantee success. But if you are realistic about the project, find enough capital, understand your market, educate yourself, and surround yourself with experts, you will give yourself the best chance of success in a relatively hostile business environment.


Caffeinated HomeBrew

I searched around and couldn't find anything about using caffeine in beer other than various coffee drinks, which is not what i'm going for. I want a beer to start off a big night with, giving a good caffeine boost to get things going.

The FDA is moving towards banning the use of caffeine in commercially produced alcoholic beverages, and several of the big brands (Sparks, Tilt) have already changed their recipes to remove caffeine. What i'm not looking for is responses about warnings for my health or admonishments, rather i'm looking for thoughts, ideas, or any suggestions from the community on how to pull this off. I never liked those alcoholic energy drinks because the flavor was atrocious and I haven't had one in years, but still love the idea of the alcohol/energy combination.

From what I've read, Red bull has 80mg of caffeine per 8.3oz can, a shot of espresso has around 100mg, and 7oz of coffee has anywhere from 65-150mg or so depending on the bean type and process. I'm looking to make a beer with 100mg or so of caffeine per 12oz, without affecting the flavor much. My current plan is to purify the caffeine in no-doz pills (200 mg each, here's one method -http://www.instructables.com/id/Extracting-almost-pure-Caffeine-from-Caffeine-Pi), dissolve that powder into a thin ethanol solution and pour that into my bottling bucket when I add the priming sugar.

I'm thinking I'll use an IPA, since I've heard caffeine at those concentrations has a mildly acidic/bitter taste that I'll need to deal with, so maybe a nice american IPA with the 3C's and some Simcoe. 7-8% abv, 80-90 IBU should do the trick

Any thoughts/suggestions/experience anyone has had with this kinda thing?

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Jmo88

Well-Known Member

Very interesting. I can't help much but I'd be interested in the same thing. However, I'd be reluctant to caffeinate the entire 5 gallons. I only hit the town needing red bull every now and then.

Actually now that I'm thinking about it, why not just pop some no doze while drinking an ipa? Although that doesn't sound as fun, it's basically the same thing.

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Haha yeah, that's a very good point jmo. as with pretty much everything else I do with home brewing, its really just to see if I can! And though I don't personally care, caffeinated beverages have less stigma than taking a pill. and its more novel this way.

I may just make a small amount of caffeine/alcohol solution (say, an ounce of 20% ethanol/80% water with 2 no doze pills dissolved in it, then split it into 4 parts and add straight to the bottle. That way i'll be taking a little less risk with the experiment.

LexusChris

Supporting Member

A tincture makes a lot of sense. You can both guage the taste impact, as well as the strength.

You might also think about using some herbs like yerba mate or guarana, to give you the pep you are looking for. There is a yerba mate beer recipe here, although I've not tried it.

Mordantly

Banned

Klyph

Well-Known Member

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Yeah, I don't expect most people on here to understand the draw of the caffeine/alcohol combination, but I love it. If I want a big Friday night out after a long week of work, its just the thing I need to make it happen. Its just that Joose is so damn terrible. what i'm inventing here is the classy version of Joose only meant for that 0.5% of the population that would ever want it, but perfectly awesome for us 0.5%.

I'm going to try adding the 100mg level of caffeine to a standard pale ale to see how it affects the flavor first. maybe a SNPA or something. Then I can plan accordingly. I may rely on the caffeine to provide some of the up front bitterness, letting me reduce my bittering hops a bit and do a lot of late-hopping flavor/aroma hops instead for a good cover up flavor if necessary.

Razorbrew

Well-Known Member

This might be interesting

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

This might be interesting

Bonsai4tim

Well-Known Member

why don't you figure your average "dose" by taking the "recommended" amount of caffeine on the no-doz bottle, and seeing if its enough to keep you more awake.

Once you have the average amount you need, figure out how many bottles of beer you want it in (like 2 12 oz bottles) and do your math from there (say 2 tablets in 2 bottles, and you are bottling 24 bottles, so 24 tablets) and add that to your priming solution.

Klyph

Well-Known Member

Dr_Gordon_Freeman

Well-Known Member

Search for "Mountain Brew". Instead of water, use Mt. Dew in your wort. From the data I saw online, Mt. Dew has about 550mg caffeine per gallon.

I had the idea of kicking that up even more with a few cans of Monster energy drink.. They make a tasty citrus one.

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Bonsai and klyph - I've played with nodoz and redbull enough know I want about 100mg/12oz, so I'll just measure out the 200mg nodoz accordingly. Might use the caffeine powder if I want to make a big batch though, to save on the time refining the nodoz (see first post). As for bitterness, see my previous post, I'm gonna test with a mid hoppy pale ale like sierra nevada, and shift my hop schedule towards the end of the brew time as I see fit to hit the right bitterness level.

Gordon - if I made it with mountain dew or monster, I think it'll turn out a lot closer to sparks, or joose, which is exactly what I don't want haha.
I

Dr_Gordon_Freeman

Well-Known Member

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

CharlosCarlies

Senior Member

Mordantly

Banned

Austinhomebrew

Well-Known Member

Just drink a beer and eat the world's first all-natural performance enhancing meat snack at the same time.

(not affiliated with this product but found it funny)

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Bernie Brewer

Grouchy Old Fart

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Retroviridae

Well-Known Member

caffeine can be toxic to yeast at high doses. This paper (http://www.springerlink.com/content/fq7656v10j018209/) used 20 millimolar caffeine as a toxic dose for a different yeast (S. pombe). That converts to 115mg/oz. You are planning to use 1/12 of that concentration, so it should be fine.

But do make sure the caffeine is well dissolved. If there are un-dissolved chunks of no-doz at the bottom of the bottle, flocc'ed yeast at the bottom of the bottle may experience much higher local concentrations, maybe speeding autolysis. In addition, you would get very different doses of caffeine in different bottles if it isn't well mixed.

In my opinion, caffeine tastes more astringent than bitter. I imagine its flavor hiding better under the chalky dry tannic astringency of a dry irish stout.

TBrosBrewing

Well-Known Member

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

caffeine can be toxic to yeast at high doses. This paper (http://www.springerlink.com/content/fq7656v10j018209/) used 20 millimolar caffeine as a toxic dose for a different yeast (S. pombe). That converts to 115mg/oz. You are planning to use 1/12 of that concentration, so it should be fine.

But do make sure the caffeine is well dissolved. If there are un-dissolved chunks of no-doz at the bottom of the bottle, flocc'ed yeast at the bottom of the bottle may experience much higher local concentrations, maybe speeding autolysis. In addition, you would get very different doses of caffeine in different bottles if it isn't well mixed.

11 12oz bottles, so if i extract the caffeine from 8 200mg no-doz pills then i'll hit 145mg per bottle, or 12mg/oz.

I'll be extracting the caffeine into a couple ounces of 50/50 water/ethanol, so i'll be able to ensure that it is very thoroughly dissolved and sanitized before mixing in. That will also bump the ABV up on those bottles by about 0.8% according to my calculations, but i'll figure that part out at bottling time

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

So as an update, I was on my way back from Chicago a couple nights ago and whipped this label up on the plane on Photoshop. I think it captures the essence of the caffeinated IPA attitude pretty decently.
http://tweetphoto.com/9313723

I made a thread about it in the label section with a couple variations on it, so for the purpose of keeping this thread recipe oriented, i'd appreciate keeping label related comments there: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/f46/pale-ale-ipa-label-design-scheme-several-versions-158669/

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

update 2: I just racked the IPA that i'm going to use as the vehicle for this experiment to the secondary and added my dry hops. Tastes great at this point and its got a nice strong resiny character. should get the job done.

here's the recipe for the batch - which i'm splitting into 4 gallons of "Alpha Dog" normal IPA and 1 gallon of "Bold as Love" Caffeinated IPA during bottling
http://hopville.com/recipe/155177/american-ipa-recipes/alpha-dog---bold-as-love

Itsme6582

Well-Known Member

Rickfrothingham

Well-Known Member

Thanks for all the tips guys!

I cracked open the first bottles of this over the weekend - it worked like a charm! We all had a great night without having to slog through any cans of JOOSE or knock back jaagerbombs.

The recipe I used for the IPA was a real hop bomb (It really split the difference between a few clone recipes I found for Green Flash WC IPA and Pliney the Elder) to the point that it was pretty overwhelmingly hoppy (even for me, and that says alot). I think it'll taste better once some of the hop character mellows a bit over the next few months

1. Comparing the caffeinated vs non-caffeinated versions, i can just barely tell a difference, though if I didn't know ahead of time I wouldn't have noticed the caffeine taste. The big thing here was the purification of the caffeine with crushing the no-doz pills and using ethanol extraction. If you're going to use no-doz pills as you base then you absolutely need to extract the caffeine rather than just dumping the crushed up pills in, to get rid of all that bitter adjunct they make the pill out of! Some people have advocated using Caffeine Powder, but i think thats a little dangerous for me since i have no way to measure it accurately enough for my comfort. Using no-doz pills offers a very easy dosing standard, since each has 200mg.

2. Use something flavorful as your base beer (IPA, Stout, Barleywine) or use less caffeine per beer. I added the same amount of caffeine (150mg) to a lighter pale ale and the caffeine shown through more, though still not in a completely overwhelming way. A lighter beer would be good to use if you were going to only caffeinate it to say 40 or 50mg/12oz, in the soda range. The difference there is that at 7.5% and 150mg Caffeine this is a 1 per night beer, where a lighter alternative would be something you could drink several of for the same effect.


Bottling Tips for the Homebrewer

Over the last year I've posted bits and pieces of this in various threads when people asked for bottling advice. I end up getting a lot of questions about my process, so since we have so many new people joining this site in a post holiday fit of brewing enthusiasm, that means really soon there are going to be a bunch of new bottlers stepping up to the plate.

First off, you may hear a lot of people recommending kegging. In fact there is a strange phenomenon on here that inevitably when someone asks a question about bottling some overzealous (and probably new) kegger will jump in with HIS answer, which is something like "Bottling sux, you should keg." Like the thought of kegging beer is so foregin to new people or established brewers that despite the fact that this section of the forum is called "Bottling and Kegging" that perhaps we who bottle are total idiots who perhaps need to be told that such a thing exists.

It's up to you what ultimately you choose to do. But don't let zealots convince you that no one bottles. actually there is probably a vast majority of brewers who still bottle for various reason (cost of setup, space requirements, or simply personal choice.)

But you will find that many experienced brewers who are keggers actually still rack some of their beer to bottles and prime and condition with sugar, or they use a beer gun (either blickman or Biermuncher's) to fill some bottles. For whatever reason, they still bottle some of their beer.

If you enter contests then bottling is a must.

I don't have the space or money to keg right now, nor do I think in the future when I move out of my loft will I keg exclusively. There is still something about cracking open a bottle of your own beer. And not many people want to take a keg on a picnic or to a game, when a six pack will do (and it's hard to stick a keg in your pocket when you are trying to sneak a beer in somewhere, not that I know anything about sneaking homebrew in.)

Bottling doesn't have to be a chore.

The trick to bottling is to make the process work for you. to make yourself as comfortable as possible doing it. It took me a few batches but I got it dialed in enough to get it done in about an hour for a 5 gallon batch. not including clean up. One of my half batches can be done in 20 minutes

You just gotta dial in your process.

Try different things until they work for you, until you've pimped it down to the bare minimum of steps. and practice practice practice. and if it doesn't work for you, then scrap it and change it again.

Eventually you will find exactly what works for you.

For example I hated the bottling wand on the end of a hose, with the bottles in beer case method, that most people use..You know, then one shown in Papazian's book where the bucket is on the counter and you sit on the floor and fill the bottles sitting in the cases. well the first time I did that, I lost track of where I was in order, and actually capped about a half dozen empty bottles. as well as spilling a sh*tload of beer because I could really see when the wand was putting the beer to the lip of the bottle. a ton would spill out.

Plus sitting for so long on the floor was bad for my back. I'm 6'7" and sitting on the floor and getting up again, is not fun.

So I kept tweaking my process until I was happy. I came up with these "tweaks."

I have my bottling wand mounted right on my bucket's spigot.

So now I can sit at my dining room table and fill bottles comfortably. I prop my bucket on a pot, or fermenter bucket to bring it up to my eye level. (Actually that pot is too low, I have now moved it to the top of my boil kettle. a fermenter bucket is about the same height and works great as well.

I have a dip tube in my bucket so I get all but about 4 ounces of stuff from my bottling bucket. What that means in my case is about another 6 pack of beer- 54 bottles instead of 48.

And the biggest thing about a dip tube is that there is no need to tilt to get the last few dregs of beer. It is easy to make, all you need to do is find a drilled stopper (or drill your own) that fits in the back part of your bottling bucket spigot (I got mine from my lhbs) then you need to find a tube that fits on the hole. It could be a piece of bent copper tubing, it could be the body of a ballpoint pen, it could even be a bent piece of racking cane. I made my latest one out of broken racking cane that I heated and bent over an alcohol spirit lamp, heating and cooling until I got the right bend. (One tip, bend it until the back part of the bottom of the tube touches the bottom of the bucket, leaving a tiny gap in the front for the beer to flow through.)

Here's an overview of my process

The first thing I do is set the fermenter on my dining room table, and open it (briefly) to take a gravity reading, so I can calculate the amount of priming sugar I need. (I carb to style and use beersmith to tell me how much I need.) Most of you in your first few batches will be using the stock 4.5 - 5 ounce packets that came with you ingredient kit.

Putting the fermenter in position first gives some time to let the beer settle since I just moved it. Some folks put it in position hours ahead of time, but I've never seen the need.

After I've set the bucket down, and figured out how much sugar I need, I measure it out and set it to boil. I start my priming sugar water boiling.

Then I start sanitizing my gear. I fill my bottling bucket with about 2 gallons of diluted starsan, and add my auto siphon, my bottling wand, my dip tube setup and anything else I may need into it, after first swirling around the bucket a few times to spread the sanitizer along all the sides of it. I then set the bucket on the table, and autosiphon about half of the sanitizer into another bucket. This sanitizes the inside of the autosiphon and the hose. After abut a gallon to gallon and a half of sanitizer has run through it. I open the spigot to flush that with the remained of the sanitizer as well.

Then I install the dip tube that is pictured above.

By now I usually can hear the boiling of my solution in the kitchen. I check on it, and perhaps lower the heat a bit to a gentle boil.

Then I begin to sanitize my bottles with my vinator. after the first case is sanitzed then take the priming solution off the stove to let it cool a bit, you can set it in a bit of cold water in your sink. Then I go back and sanitize my second case and final sixpack of bottles.

I can't stress how valuable the vinator is for making sanitization of bottles a simple task.

After sanitizing I count out my bottlecaps and drop them in my vinator to sanitize. I set my bottling bucket below the fermenter and pour half of the priming solution into the bottom of the bucket then I start racking the beer on top of it. When I get to 2.5 gallons I I add the remainder of the solution to the bucket.

When ready I put a pot lid on top of the bottling bucket, and gently lift it on top of a pot, or the empty primary bucket and clip on the bottling wand to the spigot. The pot lid (or plastic bucket lid) is to keep any dust or particulate matter from fallin in.

Then I get ready to bottle.

Since I'm a lefty I work right to left on my table. I put my two cases of sanitized bottles on the right hand side of the table (on the chair next to me,) I put the vinator on the table to the right of the bucket filled with my bottles caps sanitizing away. Then when I fill the bottle I place a cap loosely on it, and move it to the left side of the table. with the bottling bucket in the middle of the table there's room for a case worth of filled bottles on the table on the left side.

When I hit 24 bottles, I stand up, move the empty case to a chair on the left side of the table, then I pick up my capper and cap the first case of bottles, putting them in the case on the chair nearby. Then I grab a beer from the fridge, and sit back down and do the next case of beer.

I can get them all done and the bottling bucket and stuff soaking in oxyclean between 45 minutes and an hour.

Then the boxes go into a dark warm closet and I forget them for the next 3 weeks, trusting that they will be approaching drinkability and an adequate carbonation level by then.

If you find this thread helpful, then please hit the good ole prost button!! Thanks!


Edit, Feb 6, 09 This thread has got a huge amount of traffic, and it also has had a large amount of great tips added to it, if I could change the original name I would call it' Revvy and Friend's Tips for the Bottles, yadda yadda yadda. So thanks everyone, and keep them coming.

Edit 08-25-10 I just discovered a cool article on here about bottling with krausen that is worth adding here. By our own Kai Troester

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc

I wanted to add a few more notes and a couple more pictures.

To illustrate how each brewer should tweak a process (any one, not just bottling) until it works for them, Grinder1200 took my idea of mounting the wand on his bucket, and added it to using his dishwater as a bottle filling rack. (I don't have a dishwater in my cubbyhole kitchen, but if I did, I would probably do the same thing..though I do enjoy sitting to bottle.) Note the OTHER addition to his bottling setup. the nice glass of beer.

A lot of people have asked where I got the clamps for the the wand.

I get these from my lhbs, to clamp the wand to my sigot, I use a 1 inch "bridge" piece of bottling hose. If the LHBS doesn't have them, I'm sure you can find them a a hardware store too. it's nice because there is no worry about rusting, of the fact that sometimes the screw is galvanized.

I don't label unless I'm giving bottles away as gifts, then I don't use traditional labels, I bottle hanging tags. I designed the template and it is freely available online. Thanks to Morotorium

After looking all day for hanging tags templates for bottles, I made up one of my own as a MS word Document.

Each tag is approx 2 inches wide, and the text area after the fold is about 5 inches.


I don't like to glue labels on, especially since I spend so much time removing them (Although some folks swear by milk as label glue). So I like the idea of a hanging tag that slips over the neck of the bottle and hangs there. I printed it out on thick photopaper. All you need to do is cut them out, cut out the hole for the neck (or just make 2 slits at the cross) and fold it downword.

You just basically need to stick a graphic in each space, and add your own text to the text blocks. Or move stuff around and add your own text boxes wherever you want it.

Here's the links from MoRoToRiUm
Sample

When I bottle I just write on the bottlecap with a sharpie a letter code for the name of the beer I brewed. For Example, Old Bog Road (my brown ale) is simply OBR. If I have multiple batches of the same beer going at the same time, I will add a letter code as well.

Again, there are plenty of ways to do just about every aspect of brewing, and the trick is to make it work for you. This is a hobby, not something to do battle with. Even something that some people consider a pain, such as bottling can become as effortless as you choose to make it. All it takes it experimentation trying something new until it works for you.

Sigmund

Well-Known Member

The Pol

Well-Known Member

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc

FYI Northern Brewer has an amazing resource on bottling/carbing including a section on "advanced" carbonation techniques.So this post is all about various odd ways to carb including using fruit juice, flavored syrups and whatever else you can think of.

This is a good primer on bottles and their pressure.

BOTTLE TYPES AND PRESSURE
Most of the bottles you will use will be the standard 12oz bottle. These are
suitable for the vast majority of styles but we don&#8217t suggest you use them
for beers with over 3 volumes of CO2. Below is a chart based on CO2 volume
and suggested bottle usage. These are approximate guidelines and demand
that the bottles be free of cracks or chips.
BOTTLE:VOLUME CHART
Bottle type
Volume/Max. CO2

12oz 3
33cl Belgian 3.5
500ml European 3.5
Swing top 4
Champagne 7
PET 10
Kegs can be used in the place of bottles and should be treated exactly like
a large bottle. A lot of commercial brewers prime in bulk and then counter
pressure fill at bottling.

Someone bumped a thread from 2005, and this was one of the posts, some great info on priming sugars.

Many people have been told that priming bottled conditioned beer should not be done with sucrose. Many books state that malt extract is best for priming. Be aware that malt extract will generate break material when boiled, and that the fermentation of malt extract for priming purposes will often generate a krausen/protein ring around the waterline in the bottle, just like it does in your fermenter. Simple sugars don't have this cosmetic problem and the small amount used for priming will not affect the flavor of the beer (Based upon my 15+ years of brewing).

Here are some simple basic rules for Priming :
Using Corn Sugar (Sucrose) - 2/3 cup for bottling and 1/3 cup for Kegging.
Using Cane Sugar (Sucrose)- 2/3 cup for bottling and 1/3 cup for Kegging.
Using Brown Sugar (Sucrose)- 2/3 cup for bott! ling and 1/3 cup for Kegging.
Using Maple Syrup - 1¼ cup for bottling and 5/8 cup for Kegging.
Using Molasses - 1 cup for bottling and ½ cup for Kegging.
Using Honey - 1 cup for bottling and ½ cup for Kegging.

You can prime your beer with any fermentable that you want. Any sugar: Corn Sugar, Cane Sugar, Brown Sugar, Honey, Molasses (if you can get them out of the ground), even Maple Syrup can be used for priming.

The darker sugars can contribute a subtle aftertaste (sometimes desired) and are more appropriate for heavier, darker beers.
Simple sugars, like Corn or Cane Sugar, are used most often though many brewers use dry malt extract too. Ounce for ounce, Cane Sugar generates a bit more carbon dioxide than Corn Sugar, and both pure sugars carbonate more than malt extract, so you will need to take that into account.

Honey is difficult to prime with because there is no standard for concentration.! The gravity of honey is different jar to jar. To use hone y, you will need to dilute it and measure its gravity with a hydrometer. For all sugars in general, you want to add 2-3 gravity points per gallon of beer to prime.

Remember, the above are measurements for a 5 Gallon batch. It is always best to heat up anything that you are using for priming with water. If you are doing less than 5 Gallons at a time, then here are some things to take into account.

5 Gallons will give you.
54 x 12 oz Bottles
40 x 16 oz Bottles
32 x 22 oz Bottles

So divide the number of bottles into whatever you wish to use for priming and that will give you the amount your looking for.

Bottom line: use the sugar that you feel most comfortable with. Each of us has their own favorites. -->

The October 2010 Basic Brewing radio was all about alternative priming methods, and the guest (who btw, although he is a minister, from michigan, and is an expert on bottling, is NOT ME, but the coincidence is freaky) offers info on calculating how to prime with strange things.

October 28, 2010 - Alternate Priming Sugars
Home brewer Drew Filkins shares his technique of using alternative ingredients to put the bubbles in his brew.

Hydrometer readings and sugar content charts from HomeWinemaking.com http://www.home-winemaking.com/winemaking-2b.html

Here's what I'm doing with my Sri Lankin Stout, bottling with Jaggery Mollasses.


I figured out the calculation for using Jaggery Mollasses from Bangladesh to prime my Sri-lankin stout.

Basically what you need to do is look for the sugar or carbhydrate amount in the syrup and the serving size, they are defining it by.

You also want to first calculate how much corn sugar you would normally use to carb to whatever style you are aiming for, then convert that to grams. Then based on the amount of sugar (OR CARBOHYDRATES if sugars is not listed, which on some products labels they don't) per whatever serving size they give, you then will know how much of the stuff to use..


Ie, my stout I want to carb to 2.45 volumes of co2, which measures out to 4.3 oz of corn sugar at 70 degrees.

That works out to 121.9 grams.

That works our to about 5/8 of a cup. I will add that to enough water to get to 2 cups and boil it.

If you CAN'T find any nutritional info (which by law I thought it has to be posted somethwere) you're going to have to fudge it. you can treat it as mollasses, or honey and use the recommended measurment. Refer to the chart above for more info.

Listen to the podcast for a better explantaion..

I've been playing around with flavoring my priming solution at bottling time for that last bit of mouth hit and aroma when you open the bottle. I've done chilies, citrus peels, and even some spices in the boil and strained out after. I decided to add 1.5 ounces of ginger to my priming sugar boil.

As you can see it has a nice straw color as opposed to the clear you are used to. It smelled amazingly like ginger.

I've also done it with dried chilli peppers for my chocolate mole porter. And done citrus peels with various beers such as using orange peels in my wits.

You could do it with any dry spice, such as cloves, coriander, star anise for a licorice beer, cinnamon and even a vanilla beer. You can do with this is to add some lactose to the boil as well, since it is unfermentable, it should sweeten the flavor somewhat.

Other things to consider are hard candies such as jolly ranchers or even peppermint candies, you need to melt them down with water in a double boiler. Jolly ranchers, and mints will really impart a strong flavor. My nephew makes flavored schnapps employing that method and they are full of flavor. Even tootsie rolls might work.

I'm planning to try crystallized/candied ginger next time. Evidently it has a sweeter less biting flavor to it.

Edit if anyone is intersted priming with Kahlua or other liquers, there is info in this thread on Northern Brewer's forum.

There's also a thread discussing using raisins in priming bottles, here. I've never attempted it, so I can't vouch for it. Try it at your own risk. But it is an interesting idea.

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc

Hey gang didn't I tell ya. Revvy's law of bottling thread dynamics rears it's head.

Now back to our regularly scheduled program.

I wanted to show my latest bottling "layout" most of my beerstuff has been at my girlfriend's since I spend more time there than at my own place. So once again, I've had to adapt my setup to the situation. It's really not much of a change of the system, as the venue. She has a nice table in the kitchen to work at.

It still accommodates my working right to left. I grab a bottle out of the milk crate on my right, then move it to the bottling bucket and fill with my left hand, then I grab a cap out of the vinator with my right and then cap it and place it on the left side of the bottling bucket towards the back of the table, so the oldest filled bottles are in the back, and newest in front. So then when I cap from the back to the front, they all have plenty of time to void out any o2 in the headspace. (Sometimes the caps will pop off, or you can even see a little starsan bubble out of it.)

It still has room to pre-fit the caps on the full case of bottles before i stand up and cap them. Again making for more economy of motion- which means less wasted movement and therefore less time involved.

Then I stand up and cap them, bring the capper to the bottle as opposed to the bottle to the capper (that's why for me a wing capper fits my system rather than a bench capper- I just stand up over the bottles, and go "bam, bam bam. I have an antique bench capper, and once I tried to use that in my system, and found that for every 1 bottle I did with that I could lean over and cap 4 with my wing capper.)

But like anything it's about you coming up with YOUR system, not just using mine, or the one in Papazian, or in Palmer. it's coming up with a system that makes the job fast and easy for you.

When I'm standing to cap, I bring a milk crate to that spot, and when I cap them, they go to the crate which holds a case of beer in half the space of a regular beer case, and they stack. Once I get them all in I dry the starsan off the caps and write my code with a sharpie.

The beer was my Ginger Snap Brown Ale (with 2 boxes of ginger snaps in the mash tun) hence the "B" for brown.

Eschatz

Well-Known Member

Revvy

Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc

Revvy's Blog, Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning.


Almost daily here on HBT we see a rash of"my beer is undercarbed," "is flat," or "my tastes funny" thread and 99% of the time reading the first paragraph of the thread you will see that the OP indicated that they opened the beer after a few days or 2 weeks expecting their beer to be ready.

If you don't understand the carb process, it is really simple. The yeast eat the sugar solution you feed them. They "fart" co2. The CO2 fills the headspace in the bottle (the one to one and a half inch dead space between the beer and the cap) CO2 keeps being generated,and it maxes out the headspace. So it has a couple choices. blow the top of the bottle (the cap) Blow up the bottle, or seek the path of least resistance and dive back into the beer, and get absorbed (carbonated) by the liquid. Since the cap is pretty tight (and ingenious in it's design) and most bottles don't have any flaws and can maintain the pressure, the gas more often than not, takes the third option and goes back into the liquid and is absorbed by it.

JLEM, explains it better in scientific speak for all you literallists out there.

This process is dependent on, a couple of factors. The amount of sugar (though it is possible to carb a beer with NO sugar, if you have patience), the original gravity/alcohol content of the beer) and more importantly, is the temp of the liquid. The warmer the yeast the more awake they are, and they more awake they are the more faster they will consume the sugar, and max out the headspace.

It's funny that so many of our new brewers, trying to be helpful will start trouble shooting all manner of "issues," when the the only issue is that the beer needs more time, both to carb up and to reach it's prime. Many beers can be fizzy, but still taste like crap. because the beer is still very young, we call this "being green."

Beermaking has a lot of similarities to food and cooking. Ever notice that some foods, like spaghetti sauces, soups or chili's taste better as leftovers then they do when you take them first off the stove? The ingredients have to "marry" and co-mingle and some things mellow out with time.

It's the same with beer. That is one of the things that bottle conditioning does. lets the flavors "Marry" because the new co2 that builds up, and lets some of the "green" flavors fade away.

Carbonation isn't instantaneous to begin with, it takes a couple weeks for the Co2 to build up, and once the co2 has saturated the beer, EvilToj says it best.

There's no real fixed time that this process occurs, it is dependant on several factor the style of the beer (bigger, high gravity beers take longer-For example Barleywines make take upwards of a year to condition, carb and mellow out.)

Temperature also plays a role. The recommendation is to store/age your bottles in a dark place @ around 70 degrees F.

For most simple ales, the rule of thumb is 3 weeks @ 70 deg. But I have had Stouts and Porters take 6 to 8 weeks before they are ready.


Before that beers may have all manner of off tastes, including a green apple flavor, strong yeastiness (yeast bite) and they may not show any carbonation, OR they may gush when they open them (or one from the batch may be carbed, while another is flat, while a third may gush, but most of the time, they all will even out with time.

After 3 weeks @ 70 is recommended (though most of us fail at this one-Me included) that you put your beer in the fridge for a full two weeks before drinking. this will help to make you beer crystal clear and tasty.

At least new brewer, let them chill in the fridge for 48 hours before you knock them back.

Although many books refer to gushers as a sign of infection, DON'T PANIC a gushing bottle anytime within the first 3-4 weeks of bottle conditioning is not uncommon, and not NECESSARILY an indication of infection. It is AFTER the period of bottle conditioning has occured, and especially when the rest of the bottled beer is carbed and conditioned fine, that a gusher is a cause of concern. and USULLY the infection is limited to only a single, or to very few bottles-(It could be, for example, that a bottle has somehow slipped through your sanitizing process- maybe it wasn't cleaned thoroughly if it was a recycled bottle.)

Believe it or not, it is really hard to ruin/infect your beer, especially if it is your first batch, and you took even the most rudimentary sanitary precautions. It is actually more likely for an experienced brewer to get an infection- Perhaps they let something slide in their cleaning/sanitization process and something from their previous batch got nasty between brewing sessions, and infected their latest batch- It sometimes happens that small matter gets lodged in a hose connection and doesn't get cleaned out or zapped with the sanitizer. Or perhaps over many uses a fermenter or bottling bucket develops a scratch in it, which becomes a breeding ground for contamination. but with brand new, cleaned and sanitized equipment. highly unlikely.

(That's why it is a good idea NEVER to use any abrasive cleanser or cleaning tools like scrubbies, on your plastic gear. Nor is it a good idead to clean/sanitize your bottles or equipment in your fermenter or bottling bucket. I use a dedicated 5 gallon soysauce bucket for that purpose.)


Just remember, in brewing, we're not making instant lemonade here, we're not mixing a bunch of flavoring with water and consuming it the same day.

Homebrew is alive (even more than the highly processed, patsurized, and filtered, tasteless swill that passes for commercial beer- i.e. Bud, Miller, Coors.) what we're making is the result of the life cycle of living yeasts, that eat, breed, and process (read- Pee ) proteins and sugars into wonderful tasty alchohol. and since it is living, like us, it has it's own timetable and agenda.

so Relax, Don't Worry, (and if this your first batch) Have a Micro Brew Later when you have a few batches in the pipeline we'll switch that to RDWHAHB!

A good experiment, for any brewer to do, is to pull a beer out on the 7th day in the bottle and chill it for 2. then taste it. make notes on the tastes and the level of carb. Do it again on the 14th day, the 21st and the 28th. you'll really see the difference. Then leave a bottle stashed away for 6 months. chill that and taste it. and go back and read your notes. You'll learn a heck of a lot about beer doing that.

Poindexter shows in this video exactly what happens to your beer over the 3 weeks. He shows carbonation from 5 days in the bottle on.

SO STEP AWAY FROM YOUR BOTTLES, the yeasties know what they're doing, so let them do their jobs.

Since your beer's already in the bottles, that means your primary is free. so quit sampling your beer before it's ready (or you wan't have any to drink when they ACTUALLY reach their peak.) AND GET BREWING ANOTHER BATCH!


Just remember, at the minimum 3 weeks @ 70, 3 weeks @ 70,3 weeks @ 70!

Lazy Llama says it best. better than me I think.

And if after 3 weeks, if it is not carbed, or still taste funny. then wait a few more weeks.

I know this seems difficult to do right now, the waiting thing. But as you brew and as you have a pipeline going, you will have different beers at different steps of the process fermenting, in secondary if you are opting to use one, bottle conditioning, aging, and drinking. So you will never be without beer to drink.


How to Open 24 Bottles of Beer at Once - Recipes

99 Bottles Of Beer

99 bottles of beer on the wall, 99 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 98 bottles of beer on the wall

98 bottles of beer on the wall, 98 bottles of beer
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78 bottles of beer on the wall, 78 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 77 bottles of beer on the wall

77 bottles of beer on the wall, 77 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 76 bottles of beer on the wall

76 bottles of beer on the wall, 76 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 75 bottles of beer on the wall

75 bottles of beer on the wall, 75 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 74 bottles of beer on the wall

74 bottles of beer on the wall, 74 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 73 bottles of beer on the wall

73 bottles of beer on the wall, 73 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 72 bottles of beer on the wall

72 bottles of beer on the wall, 72 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 71 bottles of beer on the wall

71 bottles of beer on the wall, 71 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 70 bottles of beer on the wall

70 bottles of beer on the wall, 70 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 69 bottles of beer on the wall

69 bottles of beer on the wall, 69 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 68 bottles of beer on the wall

68 bottles of beer on the wall, 68 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 67 bottles of beer on the wall

67 bottles of beer on the wall, 67 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 66 bottles of beer on the wall

66 bottles of beer on the wall, 66 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 65 bottles of beer on the wall

65 bottles of beer on the wall, 65 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 64 bottles of beer on the wall

64 bottles of beer on the wall, 64 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 63 bottles of beer on the wall

63 bottles of beer on the wall, 63 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 62 bottles of beer on the wall

62 bottles of beer on the wall, 62 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 61 bottles of beer on the wall

61 bottles of beer on the wall, 61 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 60 bottles of beer on the wall

60 bottles of beer on the wall, 60 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 59 bottles of beer on the wall

59 bottles of beer on the wall, 59 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 58 bottles of beer on the wall

58 bottles of beer on the wall, 58 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 57 bottles of beer on the wall

57 bottles of beer on the wall, 57 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 56 bottles of beer on the wall

56 bottles of beer on the wall, 56 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 55 bottles of beer on the wall

55 bottles of beer on the wall, 55 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 54 bottles of beer on the wall

54 bottles of beer on the wall, 54 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 53 bottles of beer on the wall

53 bottles of beer on the wall, 53 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 52 bottles of beer on the wall

52 bottles of beer on the wall, 52 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 51 bottles of beer on the wall

51 bottles of beer on the wall, 51 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 50 bottles of beer on the wall

50 bottles of beer on the wall, 50 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 49 bottles of beer on the wall

49 bottles of beer on the wall, 49 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 48 bottles of beer on the wall

48 bottles of beer on the wall, 48 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 47 bottles of beer on the wall

47 bottles of beer on the wall, 47 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 46 bottles of beer on the wall

46 bottles of beer on the wall, 46 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 45 bottles of beer on the wall

45 bottles of beer on the wall, 45 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 44 bottles of beer on the wall

44 bottles of beer on the wall, 44 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 43 bottles of beer on the wall

43 bottles of beer on the wall, 43 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 42 bottles of beer on the wall

42 bottles of beer on the wall, 42 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 41 bottles of beer on the wall

41 bottles of beer on the wall, 41 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 40 bottles of beer on the wall

40 bottles of beer on the wall, 40 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 39 bottles of beer on the wall

39 bottles of beer on the wall, 39 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 38 bottles of beer on the wall

38 bottles of beer on the wall, 38 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 37 bottles of beer on the wall

37 bottles of beer on the wall, 37 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 36 bottles of beer on the wall

36 bottles of beer on the wall, 36 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 35 bottles of beer on the wall

35 bottles of beer on the wall, 35 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 34 bottles of beer on the wall

34 bottles of beer on the wall, 34 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 33 bottles of beer on the wall

33 bottles of beer on the wall, 33 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 32 bottles of beer on the wall

32 bottles of beer on the wall, 32 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 31 bottles of beer on the wall

31 bottles of beer on the wall, 31 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 30 bottles of beer on the wall

30 bottles of beer on the wall, 30 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 29 bottles of beer on the wall

29 bottles of beer on the wall, 29 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 28 bottles of beer on the wall

28 bottles of beer on the wall, 28 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 27 bottles of beer on the wall

27 bottles of beer on the wall, 27 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 26 bottles of beer on the wall

26 bottles of beer on the wall, 26 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 25 bottles of beer on the wall

25 bottles of beer on the wall, 25 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 24 bottles of beer on the wall

24 bottles of beer on the wall, 24 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 23 bottles of beer on the wall

23 bottles of beer on the wall, 23 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 22 bottles of beer on the wall

22 bottles of beer on the wall, 22 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 21 bottles of beer on the wall

21 bottles of beer on the wall, 21 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 20 bottles of beer on the wall

20 bottles of beer on the wall, 20 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 19 bottles of beer on the wall

19 bottles of beer on the wall, 19 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 18 bottles of beer on the wall

18 bottles of beer on the wall, 18 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 17 bottles of beer on the wall

17 bottles of beer on the wall, 17 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 16 bottles of beer on the wall

16 bottles of beer on the wall, 16 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 15 bottles of beer on the wall

15 bottles of beer on the wall, 15 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 14 bottles of beer on the wall

14 bottles of beer on the wall, 14 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 13 bottles of beer on the wall

13 bottles of beer on the wall, 13 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 12 bottles of beer on the wall

12 bottles of beer on the wall, 12 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 11 bottles of beer on the wall

11 bottles of beer on the wall, 11 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 10 bottles of beer on the wall

10 bottles of beer on the wall, 10 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 9 bottles of beer on the wall

9 bottles of beer on the wall, 9 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 8 bottles of beer on the wall

8 bottles of beer on the wall, 8 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 7 bottles of beer on the wall

7 bottles of beer on the wall, 7 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 6 bottles of beer on the wall

6 bottles of beer on the wall, 6 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 5 bottles of beer on the wall

5 bottles of beer on the wall, 5 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 4 bottles of beer on the wall

4 bottles of beer on the wall, 4 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 3 bottles of beer on the wall

3 bottles of beer on the wall, 3 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 2 bottles of beer on the wall

2 bottles of beer on the wall, 2 bottles of beer
Take one down and pass it around, 1 bottle of beer on the wall

1 bottle of beer on the wall, 1 bottle of beer
Take one down and pass it around, no more bottles of beer on the wall

No more bottles of beer on the wall, no more bottles of beer
Go to the store and buy some more, 99 bottles of beer on the wall Lyrics from a song in Public Domain


Best for Cocktail Kits: Cocktail Courier

Why We Chose It: You can be your own bartender when everything you need for craft cocktails is sent straight to your home.

Pros
Cocktail recipes from pro bartenders
Everything you need is included
No subscription required

Cons
Cocktail options for some spirits may be limited

If you enjoy making your own drinks but don’t have access to all the specialty syrups, mixers, and garnishes that bartenders use, Cocktail Courier will solve that problem. Each cocktail kit has everything you need to recreate handcrafted cocktails developed by professional bartenders. This includes spirits, citrus fruits, mixers, specialty syrups and cordials, bitters, and garnishes. All you’ll need are standard bar tools like a shaker, your serving glass, and ice.

You can search by the base spirit to find drink recipes that meet your preferences and then choose the size box you want by the number of servings for most cocktails, it's between two and 12 drinks. These cocktail kits can be purchased a la carte or you can subscribe for regular deliveries.

Cocktail Courier cannot ship to states that don’t allow for spirits delivery, but as long as you live in one of the lower 48 states, you can order any box as Just the Mix. You’ll receive all the same ingredients minus the booze.


2021 SYNDICATE MEMBERSHIP DETAILS

We’re excited to announce that Cellador Ales Syndicate Memberships for 2021 go on sale in November!

We have always sought to create community at Cellador Ales, and Syndicate Members are the heart of that community. You’re brought together by your love of craft beer, and more specifically your want to explore the bounds of experimentation in beer production.

We are so grateful to all of our members. You are the ones who give us license to be creative, to experiment, and to be bold, and your membership is truly what gives us the ability to pursue those passion projects and much, much more.

Thank you for being a part of our community and for helping us to make Cellador Ales everything it is and will be!

6 member-only releases –

(3) 375ml bottles, (3) 750ml bottles

10% discount on all purchases w/exception to event tickets

Merchandise Choice (pick 1): Nalgene Water Bottle/Growler, Syndicate Branded Spiegelau Glass, or Syndicate Branded Baggu Tote Bag

Option to purchase member exclusive 4 Collab 4 pack of cans (more details coming soon)

Member Party Invitation and other exclusive events (hopefully)

$125 + tax

6 member-only releases –

2 bottles per release

(6) 375ml bottles, (6) 750ml bottles

10% discount on all purchases w/exception to event tickets

Merchandise Choice (pick 1): Nalgene Water Bottle/Growler, Syndicate Branded Spiegelau Glass, or Syndicate Branded Baggu Tote Bag

Option to purchase member exclusive 4 Collab 4 pack of cans (more details coming soon)

Member Party Invitation and other exclusive events (hopefully)

$225 + tax

6 member-only releases –

3 bottles per release

(9) 375ml bottles, (9) 750ml bottles

15% discount on all purchases w/exception to event tickets

Merchandise Choice (pick 1): Nalgene Water Bottle/Growler, Syndicate Branded Spiegelau Glass, or Syndicate Branded Baggu Tote Bag

Option to purchase member exclusive 4 Collab 4 pack of cans (more details coming soon)

Member Party Invitation and other exclusive events (hopefully)

Syndicate Branded Handmade Ceramic Mug (tiers 3-5 exclusive)

$300 + tax

6 member-only releases –

4 bottles per release

(12) 375ml bottles, (12) 750ml

15% discount on all purchases w/exception to event tickets

Merchandise Choice (pick 1): Nalgene Water Bottle/Growler, Syndicate Branded Spiegelau Glass, or Syndicate Branded Baggu Tote Bag

Option to purchase member exclusive 4 Collab 4 pack of cans (more details coming soon)

Member Party Invitation and other exclusive events (hopefully)

Syndicate Branded Handmade Ceramic Mug (tiers 3-5 exclusive)

$375 + tax

THE V

Limited to a maximum of 55 members
Made available first to 2020 V Members, and if spots remain, to 2020 Tier 4 members & and those who receive a personal invite (you will know you are invited if you receive an email from us at time of re-enrollment)

6 member-only releases / 4 bottles per release (24 bottles total)
1 Exclusive “V” Magnum release (1 1500ml Magnum and 2 750ml bottles)
7 total releases: (12) 375ml, (14) 750ml, (1) 1.5L V Magnum

20% discount on all purchases w/exception to event tickets

Merchandise Choice (pick 1): Nalgene Water Bottle/Growler, Syndicate Branded Spiegelau Glass, or Syndicate Branded Baggu Tote Bag

Syndicate Tier V Exclusive T-Shirt

Option to purchase member exclusive 4 Collab 4 pack of cans (more details coming soon)

Member Party Invitation and other exclusive events (hopefully)

Syndicate Tier V Branded Handmade Ceramic Mug with Gold Luster Emberllishment (exclusive to tiers 5)

Tier V first right of refusal Invite to limited space event(s) throughout the year including Masumoto Family Farms Harvest Weekend, luncheon bottle share, and blending session with Kevin (also hopefully)

Early access to every bottle release before other members

$475 + tax

Membership Enrollment Schedule

Tier 5 Re-Enrollment – Opens November 1st

Remaining Tier 5 Memberships (Invite Only) – Opens November 3rd (If Available)

Member Tiers 1-4 Re-Enrollmen t – Opens November 5th

Membership Waitlist – Opens November 12th

Public Release of Remaining Memberships – Opens November 19th (If Available)

*Enrollment is available to each segment from their release until all memberships are sold out, regardless of when memberships are made available to other groups.

General Info

  • EXCLUSIVE BEERS – included bottles of 6 different beers, brewed exclusively for our members & the opportunity to purchase other beers that aren’t available to the public
  • EARLY ACCESS to beer releases online, before the public
  • DISCOUNTS on just about everything*
  • MERCH made just for our club members
  • INVITES to a variety of member events (*assuming that sort of thing is ever allowed again)

Details

  • CRV and sales tax will be added at checkout.
  • Possible additional limited syndicate releases will be available at an additional cost.
  • If you are a current member, your discount will not apply to the purchase of a new membership for 2021.
  • All merchandise will be available in early 2021, please select your t-shirt at the time of purchase.
  • Extra merchandise will be available to purchase.
  • Members will get the first opportunity to purchase memberships for 2022 (we do not guarantee a membership spot, or availability to extra bottles, but members will be given the first opportunity).
  • Members will get the first opportunity to purchase all non-Syndicate bottle releases with bottle limits depending on the release size. These general public releases will first be available to members via the website.
  • Some Syndicate releases may allow for extra bottles to be purchased, depending on the size of the batch. Limits for these bottles will be equal for all membership tiers.
  • If extra syndicate bottles are still available after 30 days, they may be made available to the public in our tasting room, and occasionally may be distributed for special events.
  • The styles and timing of the 6 releases will be at the sole discretion of our team.
  • You must be 21 years or older to join the Cellador Ales Syndicate.
  • All member bottles and any other open orders MUST BE PICKED UP BY MARCH 31, 2022 regardless of whether you are a 2022 member.

Membership Access

Memberships are managed online through our website. Upon enrollment, you will create a username and password. Please remember your login information in order to process your allocations and to get your discount on other purchases throughout the year.

Each membership release will require you to process your allocations online through our website (at no extra cost). You will receive an email when each allocation is released, and will be asked to process that allocation before the specified date. By logging into the profile you created for your membership, allocations will be available in the store – follow the same checkout process as you would purchase any other item online, and note that you will not be charged for these allocations.

Mailing/Holdings

  • Proof that purchaser, designated trustee or delivery recipient is over 21 is required, regardless of delivery method.
  • We can ship within CA at an additional cost. Find out more information on our shipping policies here.
  • Though we encourage you to pick up your allocations and purchases periodically throughout the year, 2021 members will have the option to hold your bottles at the brewery through March 31, 2022. All orders are automatically held at the brewery unless you indicate that you want them shipped by purchasing a shipping box. Any bottles or merchandise that are not picked up by March 31, 2022 will be forfeited without refund regardless of whether you re-enroll as a 2022 member.
  • 2020 members have the option to hold their orders at the brewery through March 31, 2021, regardless of membership renewal.
  • Orders purchased before your membership is in active on 1/1/2021 will be subject to our normal 90-day pick-up policy, and will be forfeited without refund if not picked up in that window.
  • To pick up your order at the brewery, we ask that you email [email protected] 24 hours in advance to let us know to have your order ready. This is particularly important for large orders. Orders can only be picked up during regular tasting room hours.
  • Members may designate a Trustee to pick up their beers. An ID proving that the person is accepting the package is 21+ years of age will be required. The name of your trustee must be emailed to [email protected] Trustees must be indicated for each pickup unless you have designated a permanent trustee. Trustees can be changed at any time by emailing [email protected]

Shipping within California

*Our shipping policy may change slightly pending the re-opening of our tasting room.

Shipping is available to both members and non-members. Shipping can be made to any residential or business address in California at an additional cost. A flat rate shipping cost of $20, which is charged when you purchase a shipping box, will be applied to all merchandise and bottle orders. Each piece of glassware and/or shirt shipped will take the place of 1 bottle in a box. If you would like to save on shipping costs, you have the option to combine orders and ship multiple orders at once. If you would like to do this, just purchase a shipping box when you are ready to ship all orders being held at the brewery. Please keep in mind our non-member and member hold times, as each individual order may have a different hold expiration date. Cellador Ales is only legally allowed to ship to addresses within California, even if your state allows beer shipping. GSO will not ship to PO boxes. Shipment cost will increase for each case of 12 items (Example: If you combine 24 bottles into a shipment order, you will need to purchase 2 shipping boxes, which will total $40 for shipping).

Shipments are currently processed and picked up by GSO every weekday. All packages are shipped overnight, and will be delivered on the following day. We will ship orders Monday through Thursday each week, for delivery Tuesday through Friday. The cutoff time for shipments each day if 4 PM. Any shipments placed after that time will be shipped on the next available day.

A signature and government issued ID proving that the person accepting the packing is 21+ years of age will be required upon delivery. We cannot ship beer to P.O. boxes. If purchaser is not present for adult signature, and a package is returned, purchaser will be charged a return fee (determined by cost of return shipping, restocking, and any other fees that may occur). If packages are returned to Cellador Ales, you may re-choose your form of delivery/pick-up at that time by contacting [email protected]

Re-Selling Beer

We expect that no Syndicate release will be resold for any reason. All beer purchased and obtained through The Syndicate is for the purpose of consumption. Please do not resell Cellador brands outside of the Syndicate releases without obtaining a wholesale account with us. To set up a wholesale account, please reach out to Alex at [email protected] Reselling bottles without a wholesale account with Cellador Ales is illegal and can jeopardize our ABC license. Licensed retailers are prohibited from purchasing beer as a Syndicate member unless it is solely for personal consumption and not for resale or distribution. If a club member is found illegally reselling our beer, their membership will be canceled, and whatever allocations are left at that point will be refunded. Beer trading is not prohibited.

Cancellations/Terminations of Syndicate Membership

Cellador Ales reserves the right to cancel/terminate Syndicate Memberships for any reason. If your Syndicate membership is terminated by Cellador Ales, you will be notified through the email attached to your account and a refund based on the remaining allocations will be refunded to you. It is up to Cellador Ales’ discretion to allow or terminate any memberships at any time, and reasons may or may not be given.

Cellador Ales’ Syndicate Membership sales are final, and once purchased, members may not cancel their membership for that year.

Any benefits purchased with the Syndicate membership that are not picked up/set up to be delivered by March 1st, 2022 will be considered the property of Cellador Ales.

Disclaimer

All shipping and pick up policies are subject to change at any time, and may be altered once our tasting room is open.

Questions?

Please email us at [email protected] for any additional info.

We’re excited and looking forward to a great year with you all. Cheers!


Watch the video: 3 τρόποι για να κόψεις ένα γυάλινο μπουκάλι (November 2021).